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GNOME

Gnome desktop & HD scaling tricks

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GNOME

Linux desktop usage problems and challenges come in many guises and forms. Then, you find yourself with monitor that offers HD resolution (or higher), only shown on a relatively small canvas of pixels, e.g.: a laptop, and you gain a whole new set of problems and challenges.

For a few years now, I've contended with the topic of HD displays, HD scaling and such. My first encounter was back in 2014, with my IdeaPad Y50-70 laptop, which has a 4K 15.6-inch display. Then and there, Unity handled scaling all right, better than Windows 8.1. Fast forward to my Slimbook Pro2. This is where things got rather serious, as I started using this laptop for day-to-day productivity work. In fact, the Plasma desktop is truly the only environment that offers really good scaling results. So the question is, if you prefer Gnome, what options do you have vis-a-vis HD scaling?

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Also: Sam Thursfield: Automated point and click

7 Great-Looking Gnome Shell Themes

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GNOME

Do you love Gnome Shell but hate the way it looks? Don’t worry, the Internet is chock-full of better-looking themes to choose from. There are so many, in fact, that we’ve had to filter it down to seven themes. Here are some of the best Gnome Shell themes you can use to customize your Gnome DE.

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GNOME Desktop/GTK: GNOME Shell. Human Interface Guidelines (HIG), and More

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GNOME
  • Ivan Molodetskikh: GSoC 2021: Screenshots with Pointer

    Over the summer I’m working on a new screenshot UI for GNOME Shell. Here’s my progress since the last post.

    First of all, I made the window selection mode work across multiple screens and ensured that it works correctly with HiDPI and mixed DPI setups. Each screen gets its own Overview-like view of all the windows, letting you pick the one you need at your leisure.

    In this and the following showcases, you can see GNOME Shell running with two virtual monitors: one regular DPI on the left, and one high DPI (200% scaling) on the right. Both virtual monitors use the same resolution, which is why the right one appears two times smaller.

  • GNOME's New Human Interface Guidelines Now Official - Phoronix

    In recent months there has been an effort to update GNOME's Human Interface Guidelines (HIG) to reflect the GTK4 toolkit and recommendations around new widgets, utility panes, and more for enhancing the accessibility of GNOME applications, arguably looking better, and just otherwise modernizing aspects of the HIG that haven't been touched in months. That updated GNOME HIG is now official.

  • Tobias Bernard: Community Power Part 5: First Steps

    In the previous parts of this series (part 1, part 2, part 3, part 4) we looked at how power works within GNOME, and what this means for people wanting to have an impact in the project. An important takeaway was that the most effective way to do that is to get acquainted with the project’s ethos and values, and then working towards things that align with these.

  • Tobias Bernard: Berlin Mini GUADEC

    Like everyone else, I’m sad that we can’t have in-person conferences at the moment, especially GUADEC. However, thanks to the lucky/privileged combination of low COVID case numbers in central Europe over the summer, vaccines being available to younger people now, and a relatively large local community in and around Berlin we were able to put together a tiny in-person GUADEC satellite event.

Download Google Fonts Quickly with this Neat GTK App

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Google
GNOME

Looking for an easy way to search and download fonts from Google Fonts on your Ubuntu desktop?

Try Font Downloader, a perfectly formed GTK front-end for the Google Fonts repository. The app makes it easy to browse, search, and filter (e.g., monospace, handwritten, etc) from the 1,075 free and open source fonts available on Google Fonts.

When you touch upon some typography you like the look of, Font Downloader makes it easy to test the font within the app (perfect to check it has the character coverage you need) as well download the font (to a folder of your choice) or install it on your system in ‘one-click’.

“One day I was bored of my terminal font and wanted to switch, unfortunately going through the entire process of searching Google Fonts for a font, then downloading, then copying and pasting it into my .fonts folder to only then test a font was a pain. So I decided to create this app,” the developer, Gustavo Peredo, explains on the GitHub page.

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An “Apps for GNOME” website

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GNOME

Something like an “Apps for GNOME” website might exist pretty soon. This changes nothing about existing pages. You can have a look at the current state of the website. Feedback and contributions are more than welcome.

Currently, most apps in the GNOME ecosystem are represented by a wiki page or README at our GitLab instance. All the information in these wiki pages has to be updated manually in parallel to the other sources like the AppStream MetaInfo file, the screenshots or the DOAP file. I was no longer motivated to do this work manually for my app and started looking for alternative solutions. I quickly wrote a small script that generates an app page. After showing the generated page around, several people proposed to provide such app pages in a centralized fashion for GNOME.

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Chris Lord: OffscreenCanvas update

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GNOME
Web

So, a year ago, OffscreenCanvas was starting to become usable but was missing some key features, such as asynchronous updates and text-related functions. I’m pleased to say that, at least for Linux, it’s been complete for quite a while now! It’s still going to be a while, I think, before this is a truly usable feature in every browser. Gecko support is still forthcoming, support for non-Linux WebKit is still off by default and I find it can be a little unstable in Chrome… But the potential is huge, and there are now double the number of independent, mostly-complete implementations that prove it’s a workable concept.

Something I find I’m guilty of, and I think that a lot of systems programmers tend to be guilty of, is working on a feature but not using that feature. With that in mind, I’ve been spending some time in the last couple of weeks to try and bring together demos and information on the various features that the WebKit team at Igalia has been working on. With that in mind, I’ve written a little OffscreenCanvas demo. It should work in any browser, but is a bit pointless if you don’t have OffscreenCanvas, so maybe spin up Chrome or a canary build of Epiphany.

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Hurrah, Chrome for Linux Now Supports CSD Properly

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Google
GNOME
Web

The latest development builds of Google Chrome fix several of the browser’s extant CSD issues on Linux desktops.

Those of you mouthing “What CSD related issues?!” at your screens (and thus me) probably run Google Chrome maximised on the desktop.

However, those of us who run the browser windowed have to endure (hyperbole) Chrome’s cranky client-side decoration support which draws a thick border around the entire window. This is highly noticeable in GTK themes with dark header bars, like Ubuntu’s Yaru.

Compare the current stable version of Google Chrome for Linux (v92 at the time of writing) against the current unstable build (v94) by dragging the divider in the image below (if you read from an RSS reader or a scraper site you won’t be able to do this because hey: the internet doesn’t work like that, honey).

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Ubuntu 21.10 Finally Removed “Standard” Theme-box, Only Light & Dark Mode Now

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GNOME
Ubuntu

Ubuntu 21.10 daily build got an update for its gnome-control-center package(System Settings) recently. The ‘Standard’ mode is finally removed from the Appearance settings.

The Yaru theme developer team submitted the request to remove the ‘Standard’ theme when in June, since both GTK3 and GTK4 do NOT support having different background / text colors for headerbar than in the rest of the window.

The development build of Ubuntu 21.10 finally apply the change in the recent update. The ‘Window colors’ options under Appearance settings are now only fully dark and fully light. There’s no longer dark header bar with light window color called ‘Standard’.

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A quick update on libadwaita’s animation API

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Development
GNOME

Last time we left on the general API design. Since then I’ve been refactoring the existing animation-related code so we can reuse it for our public API. Part of that refactoring has been converting the current boxed-type adwaita animation code into a gobject class. I’ve learned a lot of how GObject works under the hood by doing so, so I expect to be a lot quicker implementing the next milestones.

[...]

I quickly prototyped a demo page for said timed animations (which is highly WIP, from design to phrasing):

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Emmanuele Bassi: Documenting GNOME for developers

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GNOME

You may have just now noticed that the GNOME developers documentation website has changed after 15 years. You may also have noticed that it contains drastically less content than it used to. Before you pick up torches and pitchforks, let me give you a short tl;dr of the changes:

Yes, this is entirely intentional
Yes, I know that stuff has been moved
Yes, I know that old URLs don’t work
Yes, some redirections will be put in place
No, we can’t go back

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