Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

GNOME

Dash to Dock is Finally Available for GNOME 40

Filed under
GNOME

Dash to Dock is one of the most useful GNOME extensions for years now. With the introduction of GNOME 40, many failed to make the extension work with it.

Of course, being a popular option, the support for GNOME 40 was expected to be added soon enough. And, finally, it is here!

If you did not know, GNOME 40 includes a horizontal workspace view, which affected the workflow for some, but Ubuntu did not move the dock even with GNOME 40.

So, you can still use Dash to Dock to get a horizontal dock from the overview area.

Read more

Dash to Dock (Finally) Adds GNOME 40 Support

Filed under
GNOME

Dash to Dock now supports GNOME 40 — officially.

Work to get the popular desktop dock extension jiving with GNOME 40 desktop got underway back in April. Progress was, as we reported, swift and functional, but to try it out users needed to manually install a development version from Github.

Well, no more.

You can now install Dash to Dock on GNOME 40 from the GNOME extensions site using a compatible web browser.

Version 70 of the add-on gains official support for GNOME 40 and its horizontal workspace and application launcher. The dock can be placed on different sides of the screen, and remain accessible once exiting the overview (unlock GNOME Shell’s native dock).

Read more

GNOME Gingerblue 2.0.0 Recording Software supports XSPF 1.0

Filed under
GNOME

GNOME Gingerblue 2.0.0 is Free Recording Software for GNOME.

In the 2.0.0 release I have added support for XSPF 1.0 from Xiph.org.

Read more

Also: Free Software Review: Balena Etcher couldn’t be easier for writing ISO images, but do they really need telemetry? – BaronHK's Rants

Emmanuele Bassi: GWeather next

Filed under
Development
GNOME

Libgweather, the small GNOME library that queries weather services, is getting a major version bump to allow applications using it to be ported to GTK4.

In the beginning, there was a weather applet in the GNOME panel. It had a bunch of code that poked at a couple of websites to get the weather information for a given airport or weather observation stations, and shipped with a list of locations and their nearest METAR code.

In 2007, the relevant code was moved to its own separate repository, so that other applications and system settings could reuse the same code as the panel applet: the libgweather library was born. Aside from the basic weather information and location objects, libgweather also had a couple of widgets: one for selecting a location (with autocompletion), and one for selecting a timezone using a location.

Since libgweather was still very much an ad hoc library for a handful of applications, there was no explicit API and ABI stability guarantee made by its maintainers; in fact, in order to use it, you had to “opt in” with a specific C pre-processor symbol.

Time passed, and a few more applications appeared during the initial GNOME 3 cycles—like Weather, followed by Clocks a month later. Most of the consumers of libgweather were actually going through a language binding, which meant they were not really “opting into” the API through the explicit pre-processor symbol; it also meant that changes in the API and ABI could end up being found only after a libgweather release, instead of during a development cycle. Of course, back then, we only had a single CI/CD pipeline for the whole project, with far too little granularity and far too wide scope. Still, the GWeather consumers were few and far between, and the API was not stabilised.

Read more

Also GNOME: Alexander Larsson: Quadlet, an easier way to run system containers

GNOME 41 Desktop Lands in openSUSE Tumbleweed, KDE Plasma 5.23 Is Coming Soon

Filed under
Linux
News
GNOME
SUSE

The GNOME 41 desktop environment series was released at the end of September 2021, and is slowly making its way into the stable software repositories of various rolling-release distributions. It still didn’t arrive for Arch Linux users, but it landed in openSUSE Tumbleweed.

If you can’t wait any longer for GNOME 41 to arrive in the software repositories of your favorite distro and you want to use it right now, you can download and install the latest openSUSE Tumbleweed Live GNOME ISO snapshot from here.

Read more

Check File Integrity on Linux the Easy Way With GtkHash

Filed under
Software
GNOME

GtkHash is a simple and lightweight tool for generating checksums on Linux. You can also check for the validity of a given checksum using this tool. Comparing checksums is an excellent way of ensuring data integrity as it can help you be sure whether you're downloading files from a safe site.

Let's see how you can check the integrity of your files on Linux using GtkHash.

Read more

Also: GtkSourceStyleSchemePreview

Clapper – A New Gnome Media Player for Linux

Filed under
Linux
GNOME

Clapper is a free and open-source media player. It was built for GNOME using GJS with the GTK4 toolkit. For its media backend, Clapper uses GStreamer, and it renders everything via OpenGL. The app is built with memory friendliness in mind.

It ships with all the features you expect in a basic media player and more. This includes windowed, floating, and full-screen viewing modes. Other features include using playlists from a file, floating mode, and hardware acceleration.

Note that working with playlists is feature-limited in Flatpak version to contents of user “Videos” directory by default. Clapper can only open playlist files with the .claps file extension. There should be a single file path per line which can be either relative or absolute. Playlists can also contain HTTP links instead of file paths.

Read more

GNOME: Platform Design Goings On

Filed under
GNU
Linux
GNOME

The GNOME design team has recently been working on GNOME’s application development platform, and I thought that it might be interesting for people to hear about what we’ve been up to.

The following is an overview of our recent platform design activities, particularly libadwaita. It will give an idea of what is currently going into the GNOME platform from a UXD perspective, as well as some of things that people might expect from the platform in the future.

Read more

Also: GNOME's Platform Design Continues Evolving From Dark Mode To Toast

Gnome 40: A Look Into the Upgraded Desktop Environment

Filed under
GNOME

Gnome 40 has just been released, and it comes with a spectrum of improvements for the desktop environment. Gnome is the open-source desktop environment for various operating systems, including Linux’s Ubuntu and Fedora. This latest iteration promises to deliver a more aesthetically pleasing design and optimal performance.

Let’s take a look at the design changes and improvements made to the desktop environment.

Read more

openSUSE Tumbleweed Now Offering GNOME 41

Filed under
GNOME
SUSE

The rolling release edition of openSUSE, Tumbleweed, now offers the latest GNOME 41 desktop environment in the Tumbleweed repositories.

While openSUSE is known for their friendliness towards the KDE desktop, this week’s openSUSE Tumbleweed updates have made GNOME 41 available on this rolling-release distribution.

GNOME 41 is the latest iteration of the popular desktop but has yet to reach the majority of Linux distributions. Fortunately, those anxious to give the desktop a try need to look no further than openSUSE Tumbleweed, that includes the latest and greatest software updates.

The GNOME 41 provides significant improvements for developers, a new developer documentation website, new features in the Builder IDE and GTK4 enhancements. The software center also has a new look and makes it easier to browse and discover apps.

Read more

More and original: GNOME, Salt Update in Tumbleweed

Syndicate content