Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

GNOME

Programming: GNOME/GTK, GNU C Library, Perl and Python

Filed under
Development
GNOME
  • Implementing Gtk based Container-Widget: Part — 2

    This write-up is in continuation of its previous part — setting up basic container functionality.

    In the past couple of weeks, we moved on from just adding children to actually repositioning them (child widgets of the container, NewWidget) when enough space is not available for all widget to fit in the given width. Though the grid structure is yet to put in place, the widget could be seen taking shape already (look at below gif).

  • This week in GNOME Builder #2

    This week we fixed some specific topics which were planned for the previous cycle. If anyone wants to contribute so see some of our “Builder wishlist” go there: Builder/ThreePointThirtyfive

    Last time i had forgotten to mention the great work of our translation team which contributed various translations to Builder. Thank you!

  • Synopsys DesignWare ARC HS CPUs Now Supported By GNU C Library

    The Synopsys DesignWare ARC HS is designed for high performance embedded environments with the 32-bit HS5x and 64-bit HS6x series. Synopsys has long offered their own GNU toolchain builds to support the DesignWare ARC hardware on Linux while now the mainline support is in good shape with glibc for the ARCv2 ISA having been mainlined. Though do note it's ARCv2 and not the latest ARCv3 ISA.

  • A FIXIT-dive into an old CPAN module

    Let’s have a thought experiment. Assume there is an Open Source-licensed Perl module published on CPAN that you care about, and that hasn’t had any updates in a very long time - what are your options?

    In this blog post, I’ll take a dive into this problem, and use the Geo::Postcodes::NO module as an example. As of this writing, the module version is 0.31, and it’s most recent release was in September 2006.

    [...]

    Contribution information for the module is missing (or at least, less than expected). The author ARNE has offered his email address, and after a quick search one can find his Github page. He hasn’t published this module there, though. If we are going to contribute with this, then just adding a CONTRIBUTING.md file is a probably a good place to start. If the module you are looking for has the same problem, then check out it’s “How to contribute” page on MetaCPAN (you can find a link to it in the menu there).

    There’s another issue though – we can’t offer a pull-request! At best we can send a patch(1) file attached to an email. While this is a bit old-school and should still work (assuming the author accepts those), there might be better options available.

  • Chapter 3 - Google Correlate example update

    In Chapter 3 on Page 87, the book refers to the Google Correlate service. However, as of December 2019, the service has been shutdown. Since the chapter requires you to download a CSV formatted data, it is no longer possible. However, you can instead download a version of the data that I had used 5 years back when writing the book from here.

  • A Hundred Days of Code, Day 004 - Class Attributes and Inheritance

    Learnt about Class Attributes and Inheritance, today.

  • Weekly Python StackOverflow Report: (ccxxxv) stackoverflow python report

This week in GNOME Builder #1

Filed under
GNOME

Hello! My name is Günther Wagner and i try to give some insights in the current development of GNOME Builder. All these changes can already been tested with GNOME Builder Nightly so go ahead and give us feedback! This newsletter is called “This week in …” but probably we won’t post every week. So the interval will be a little bit arbitrary. Let’s start!

Read more

Also: GNOME Builder ❤️ Rust Analyzer Part 2

GNOME 3.36.4 released

Filed under
GNOME

Hello,

GNOME 3.36.4 is now available. This is a stable bugfix release for
3.36. All distributions shipping GNOME 3.36 are advised to upgrade.The
GNOME 3.36 flatpak runtimes have been updated as well.

If you want to compile GNOME 3.36.3, you can use the official
BuildStream project snapshot:

https://download.gnome.org/teams/releng/3.36.4/gnome-3.36.4.tar.xz

The list of updated modules and changes is available here

https://download.gnome.org/core/3.36/3.36.4/NEWS

The source packages are available here

https://download.gnome.org/core/3.36/3.36.4/sources/

Regards,

Abderrahim Kitouni
GNOME Release Team

Read more

Also: GNOME 3.36.4 Released With Faster Mutter Fix Back-Ported

4 Useful Extensions to Make GNOME Desktop Easier to Use

Filed under
GNOME

If you’ve ever used the GNOME Shell on your Linux system, you’ve probably noticed that there are some ways it works that don’t make sense right away. The workspaces are arranged vertically, and there’s no dock, panel, or desktop icons to get to your applications easily. That’s where GNOME Shell Extensions come into play. Let’s check out some Gnome extensions that make the desktop easier to use.

[...]

This, along with the default four-finger gesture in Wayland, makes me feel like I’m using a system that is designed for the modern user on a laptop or a user with a trackpad attached to their desktop. It would be a great way to make use of an Apple Magic Trackpad on Linux, as it would allow you to work with one of the best trackpads in the world and use it for more than just clicking and scrolling.

Now that you’ve taken your Linux laptop to the next level with GNOME Shell Extensions, make sure you learn how to get notified of updates for your extensions, check out some of the best laptops for Linux, and fix your touchpad that is not working in Linux.

Read more

GNOME, Linux, Qt and Git Programming

Filed under
Development
Linux
GNOME
  • Philip Withnall: URI parsing and building in GLib

    Marc-André Lureau has landed GUri support in GLib, and it’ll be available in GLib 2.65.1 (due out in the next few days).

    GUri is a new API for parsing and building URIs, roughly equivalent to SoupURI already provided by libsoup — but since URIs are so pervasive, and used even if you’re not actually doing HTTP conversations, it makes sense to have a structured representation for them in GLib.

  • Sandboxing in Linux with zero lines of code

    Modern Linux operating systems provide many tools to run code more securely. There are namespaces (the basic building blocks for containers), Linux Security Modules, Integrity Measurement Architecture etc.

    In this post we will review Linux seccomp and learn how to sandbox any (even a proprietary) application without writing a single line of code.

  • Mario Sanchez Prada: ​Chromium now migrated to the new C++ Mojo types

    At the end of the last year I wrote a long blog post summarizing the main work I was involved with as part of Igalia’s Chromium team. In it I mentioned that a big chunk of my time was spent working on the migration to the new C++ Mojo types across the entire codebase of Chromium, in the context of the Onion Soup 2.0 project.

    For those of you who don’t know what Mojo is about, there is extensive information about it in Chromium’s documentation, but for the sake of this post, let’s simplify things and say that Mojo is a modern replacement to Chromium’s legacy IPC APIs which enables a better, simpler and more direct way of communication among all of Chromium’s different processes.

  • 6 best practices for teams using Git

    Everyone should follow standard conventions for branch naming, tagging, and coding. Every organization has standards or best practices, and many recommendations are freely available on the internet. What's important is to pick a suitable convention early on and follow it as a team.

    Also, different team members will have different levels of expertise with Git. You should create and maintain a basic set of instructions for performing common Git operations that follow the project's conventions.

  • Qt for MCUs 1.3 released

    Qt for MCUs 1.3 is now available in the Qt installer. Download it to get the latest improvements and create stunning GUIs with the newly available timeline animation system.

    Since the initial release of Qt for MCUs 1.0 back in December last year, we've been hard at work to bring new features to MCUs with the 1.1 and 1.2 releases. Efforts haven't slowed down and it's already time to bring you another batch of improvements. Besides the new features, One of the goals has been to make Qt Quick Ultralite a true subset of Qt Quick and align their QML APIs to ensure both code and skills can be reused from traditional Qt platforms to microcontrollers. With Qt for MCUs 1.3, QML code written for Qt Quick Ultralite is now source-compatible with Qt 5.15 LTS.

GNOME: Session, JavaScript Shell and Mutter

Filed under
GNOME
  • Setting environment variables for gnome-session

    In the old days, you configured your desktop session on a Linux system by editing the .xsession file in your home directory. The display manager (login screen) would invoke the system-wide xsession script, which would either defer to your personal .xsession script or set up a standard desktop environment. You could put whatever you want in the .xsession script, and it would be executed. If you wanted a specific window manager, you’d run it from .xsession. Start emacs or a browser or an xterm or two? .xsession. It was pretty easy, and super flexible.

    For the past 25 years or so, I’ve used X with an environment started via .xsession. Early on it was fvwm with some programs, then I replaced fvwm with Window Maker (before that was even its name!), then switched to KDE. More recently (OK, like 10 years ago) I gradually replaced KDE with awesome and various custom widgets. Pretty much everything was based on a .xsession script, and that was fine. One particularly nice thing about it was that I could keep .xsession and any related helper programs in a git repository and manage changes over time.

    More recently I decided to give Wayland and GNOME an honest look. This has mostly been fine, but everything I’ve been doing in .xsession is suddenly useless. OK, fine, progress is good. I’ll just use whatever new mechanisms exist. How hard can it be?

  • The Surrealist Clock of JavaScript

    I’m aware that this blog is mostly read by the GNOME community. That’s why in this blog post I want to talk especially about how a large piece of desktop software like GNOME is affected by JavaScript Date being so terrible.

    Of course most improvements to the JavaScript language are driven by the needs of the web.1 But a few months ago this merge request caught my eye, fixing a bug that made the date displayed in GNOME wrong by a full 1,900 years! The difference between Date.getYear() not doing what you expect (and Date.getFullYear() doing it instead) is one of the really awful parts of JavaScript Date. In this case if there had been a better API without evil traps, the mistake might not have been made in the first place, and it wouldn’t have come down to a last-minute code freeze break.

    In the group working on the Temporal proposal we are seeking feedback from people who are willing to try out the Temporal API, so that we can find out if there are any parts that don’t meet people’s needs and change them before we try to move the proposal to Stage 3 of the TC39 process. Since I think GNOME Shell and GNOME Weather, and possibly other apps, might benefit from using this API when it becomes part of JavaScript in the future, I’d be interested in finding out what we in the GNOME community need from the Temporal API.

    It seems to me the best way to do this would be to make a port of GNOME Shell and/or GNOME Weather to the experimental Temporal API, and see what issues come up. Unfortunately, it would defeat the purpose for me to do this myself, since I am already overly familiar with Temporal and by now its shortcomings are squarely in my blind spot! So instead I’ll offer my help and guidance to anyone who wants to try this out. Please get in touch with me if you are interested.

  • GNOME Shell + Mutter 3.37.3 Are Out Roaring With Better Performance

    Released on Tuesday was GNOME 3.37.3 but missing the mark in time for that proper milestone were the all important GNOME Shell and Mutter components. But a few hours past the mark, they were released and come with some big changes.

    GNOME Shell and particularly Mutter bring some big performance improvements for their v3.37.3 releases plus other improvements. This work makes the forthcoming GNOME 3.38 all the more exciting. GNOME Shell 3.37.3 brings many improvements for GNOME 3.38 including:

    - Support for caching labels on the GPU that in some cases can almost double the performance.

Why I stick with xterm

Filed under
Software
GNOME

I use xterm. That's right, xterm. It may seem like an old school choice, and I do use GNOME 3 now as well, but after many years of trying some and ignoring others, then going back to old standbys, I find I don't need (or like) newer stuff like GNOME Terminal.

My philosophy: Start simple, improve over time, and aim for productivity.

Read more

GNOME 3.37.3 Released With More Features, Code Improvements

Filed under
GNOME

GNOME 3.37.3 is out today as the newest development snapshot working towards the September release of GNOME 3.38.

GNOME 3.37.3 is another routine development snapshot inching closer to GNOME 3.38. Among the changes with the 3.37.3 milestone include:

- The GNOME Web Browser (Epiphany) now supports muting individual tabs, a run-in-background option for web apps, a --search command line option, a dark mode for the view source mode, and a wide range of other fixes/improvements.

- The latest GTK4 toolkit development code has added more APIs, a Tracker3-based search engine implementation under the GtkFileChooser, dropping App Menu support from GtkApplication, improving X11 sync when the NVIDIA binary driver is used, various OpenGL renderer improvements, and other changes.

Read more

Getting Things GNOME To-Do App Is Back with a New Major Release, Here’s What’s New

Filed under
GNOME

Probably not many of you reading this remember Getting Things GNOME, especially because it’s been more than six years since it received an update.

Getting Things GNOME is a personal taks and to-do list items organizer for the GNOME desktop environment, inspired by the “Getting Things Done” methodology.

The new release, Getting Things GNOME 0.4, is here to prove that the app isn’t dead and that it is here to stay for a long time to come, helping you getting your everyday stuff done and be more productive.

Read more

Trim Video Clips on Linux Fast with This New GTK App

Filed under
Software
GNOME

I won’t pretend that it’s difficult to trim video on Linux because, honestly, it isn’t; a plethora of ace apps designed to make basic cuts and simple edits exist (with Qt-based VidCutter and the best known).

But if you’re a GNOME user you might be on the hunt for something that feels and functions a bit more like the rest of your apps. If so, then there’s a new option worth looking in to.

The succinctly titled ‘Video Trimmer’ is a new(ish) addition to the roster of video trimming apps for Linux and it’s incredibly simple to use.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Best Kali Linux Alternatives

A system based on security is a great approach for hackers, as it can immediately detect any defects and weaknesses in a computer or network. Linux is the most commonly used operating system among hackers. Various Linux hacking distributions consist of several tools used to improve the security of the network. Kali Linux is one of the best distributions, and alternative Linux distributions come with different advanced features. This article will discuss some of the best Kali Linux alternatives used by hackers. Read more

Cantor 20.08

Our developers are adding some usability improvements to Cantor and some initial results from GSoC projects are now available with the 20.08 release. For example, now you can collapse, uncollapse, and remove all results from the worksheet; exclude entries from the worksheet commands processing; add actions for selected texts; zoom widgets; get tooltips for almost all settings options; use the new horizontal rule entry; and more. Read more

Server: OpenStack Charms 20.08, Kubernetes Hierarchical Namespaces and Mirantis Takes Lens Kubernetes IDE

  • OpenStack Charms 20.08 – TrilioVault, Arista and more

    One of the biggest enhancements brought by the OpenStack Charms 20.08 release is an addition of TrilioVault for OpenStack. TrilioVault is a backup and recovery solution that natively integrates with OpenStack, providing data protection capabilities for workloads running in the cloud. It integrates with the OpenStack dashboard to provide tenant-level control and visibility for backup administrators in a single view. TrilioVault for OpenStack is available in the form of four charms: trilio-data-mover, trilio-dm-api, trilio-horizon-plugin and trilio-wlm that can be seamlessly plugged into the Charmed OpenStack deployment. Refer to the OpenStack Charms documentation for exact integration steps. All charms are released as stable and will be supported under the Ubuntu Advantage for Infrastructure (UA-I) subscription. Canonical and Trilio have partnered to ensure that the joint solution is fully tested and validated.

  •        
  • Introducing Hierarchical Namespaces

    Safely hosting large numbers of users on a single Kubernetes cluster has always been a troublesome task. One key reason for this is that different organizations use Kubernetes in different ways, and so no one tenancy model is likely to suit everyone. Instead, Kubernetes offers you building blocks to create your own tenancy solution, such as Role Based Access Control (RBAC) and NetworkPolicies; the better these building blocks, the easier it is to safely build a multitenant cluster.

  • Mirantis acquires popular Kubernetes IDE Lens

    Kubernetes, the container orchestration program of choice for most companies is many things, but one thing it's not is "easy." It's famous for being complex and a real pain-in-the-rump to work with, which is one reason why Mirantis, a Kubernetes, has acquired the popular open-source Lens Kubernetes integrated development environment (IDE) project. This comes after Mirantis acquired the Kotena team behind it in February. [...] Why? Mirantis states it's because: "Lens eliminates the Kubernetes complexity that has hindered mainstream developer adoption since its inception. The tool unlocks situational awareness and enables users to easily manage, develop, debug, monitor, and troubleshoot their workloads across multiple clusters in real-time."

Intel mOS: Linux variant intended for for high-performance computing

Intel mOS aims to provide a high-performance environment for software, the operating system is based on the Linux kernel, modified by Intel to make it suitable for the HPC ecosystem. The media said that mOS is still in the early stages of research, but could already be used for supercomputers like ASCI Red, IBM Blue Gene, and so on. Intel’s goal is to develop a stable version of the Aurora supercomputer when it is ready. The Intel mOS system will continue to be based on Linux extensions, the latest version 0.8 uses the Linux 5.4 LTS kernel, but it has its own LWK lightweight kernel, the Linux kernel manages a small number of CPU cores to ensure compatibility, and the LWK kernel manages the rest of the system, similar to the Mutil-OS multi-OS. Read more