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GNOME

Programming: GUADEC/GNOME, PHP and P++, Python

Filed under
Development
GNOME
  • Sam Thursfield: Blog about what you do!

    Am I the first to blog from GUADEC 2019? It has been a great conference: huge respect to the organization team for volunteering significant time and energy to make it all run smoothly.

    The most interesting thing at GUADEC is talking to community members old and new. I discovered is that I don’t know much about what people are doing in GNOME. I discovered Antonio is doing user support / bug triage and more in Nautilus. I discovered that Bastian is posting GNOME-related questions and answers on StackOverflow. I discovered Britt is promoting us on Twitter and moderating discussions on Reddit. I discovered Felipe is starting to do direct user support for Boxes. I wouldn’t know any of this if I hadn’t been to GUADEC.

    So here’s my plea — if you contribute to GNOME, please blog about it! If everyone reading this wrote just one blog post a year… I’d have a much better idea of what you’re all doing!

    Don’t forget: Planet GNOME is not only for announcing cool new projects and features – it’s “a window into the world, work and lives of GNOME hackers and contributors.” Blog about anything GNOME related, and be yourself — we’re not a corporation, we’re an underground network with a global, diverse, free thinking membership and that’s our strength.

  • PHP and P++

    PHP is the Fortran of the world-wide web: it demonstrated the power of code embedded in web pages, but has since been superseded in many developers' minds by more contemporary technologies. Even so, as with Fortran, there is far more PHP code out there than one might think, and PHP is still chosen for new projects. There is a certain amount of tension in the PHP development community between the need to maintain compatibility for large amounts of ancient code and the need to evolve the language to keep it relevant for current developers. That tension has now come into the open with a proposal to split PHP into two languages.
    PHP has been around for a long time; a previous version of the LWN site was implemented in PHP/FI in 1998. For most of its 25 years of existence, PHP has been criticized from multiple directions. Its development community has done a lot of work to address many of those criticisms while resisting others that, it was felt, went against the values of the language. Often these changes have forced code written in PHP to change as well; such changes tend to be the most controversial.

  • Find the maximum value within a string with Python

    In this chapter we are going to solve the above problem with a Python method. Given a string which consists of words and numbers, we are going to extract out the numbers that are within those words from that string, then compare and return the largest number within the given string.

  • Episode #227: Maintainable data science: Tips for non-developers

    Did you come to software development outside of traditional computer science? This is common, and even how I got into programming myself. I think it's especially true for data science and scientific computing. That's why I'm thrilled to bring you an episode with Daniel Chen about maintainable data science tips and techniques.

GNOME Foundation launches Coding Education Challenge

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GNOME

The GNOME Foundation, with support from Endless, has announced the Coding Education Challenge, a competition aimed to attract projects that offer educators and students new and innovative ideas to teach coding with free and open source software. The $500,000 in funding will support the prizes, which will be awarded to the teams who advance through the three stages of the competition.

Both the GNOME Foundation and Endless share a deep commitment to a vibrant free and open source software ecosystem.

“We’re very grateful that Endless has come forward to provide more opportunities for individuals to learn about free and open source software,” said Neil McGovern, Executive Director, GNOME Foundation. “We’re excited to see what can be achieved when we empower the creativity and imagination of our global community. We hope to make powerful partnerships between students and educators to explore the possibilities of our rich and diverse software ecosystem. Reaching the next generation of developers is crucial to ensuring that free software continues for many years in the future.”

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Also: GNOME Launches Coding Education Challenge With $500k In Funding

GNOME Firmware Updater

Filed under
Hardware
GNOME

GNOME Firmware Updater was designed in the style of a GNOME Control Center panel, and all the code is written in a way to make a port very simple indeed if that’s what we actually want. At the moment it’s a seporate project and binary, as we’re still prototyping the UI and working out what kind of UX we want from a power user tool. It’s mostly complete and a few weeks away from it’s first release. When it does get an official release, I’ll be sure to upload it to Flathub to make it easy for the world to install. If this sounds interesting to you the code is here. I don’t have a huge amount of time to dedicate to this power user tool, but please open pull requests or issues if there’s something you’d like to see fixed.

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Also: GNOME Firmware Updater Is A New UI For Managing Firmware On Linux By Power Users

KDE and GNOME Leftovers

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • [GSoC – 6] Achieving consistency between SDDM and Plasma

    Roughly a year ago I made a post titled How I’d improve KDE Plasma – a user’s point of view. I never shared the post publicly, but revisiting the first topic of the post — “my biggest pet peeve” — makes for an interesting story.

    You probably guessed it, my biggest pet peeve is what I’ve been trying to solve with this GSoC project. A year go you would find me ricing my Plasma and wondering why SDDM was doing “its own thing” instead. Fast-forward to now and I’m pretty happy to have an option to sync settings between the two, ever more so given that I could have contributed to creating it.

  • Pay another respect to kritacommand--which we are going beyond

    Krita’s undo system, namely kritacommand, was added 8 years ago to Calligra under the name of kundo2, as a fork of Qt’s undo framework. The use of undo commands, however, might have an even longer history. Undo commands provide a way to revert individual actions. Up to now, most (though not all) undo commands do it by providing two sets of code that do and undo the actions, respectively. Drawbacks of this system includes (1) it is not very easy to manage; (2) it may introduce duplicated code; and (3) it makes it hard to access a previous document state without actually going back to that state. What I do is to start getting rid of such situation.

    The plan for a new system is to use shallow copies to store documents at different states. Dmitry said “it was something we really want to do and allows us to make historical brushes (fetch content from earlier document states).” And according to him, he spent years to implement copy-on-write on paint layers. He suggested me to start from vector layers which he thought would be easier since it does not need to be very thread-safe.

    I completely understood that was a challenge, but did not realize where the difficult part was until I come here. Copy-on-write is not the challenging part. We have QSharedDataPointer and almost all the work is to routinely replace the same code. Porting tools is more difficult. The old flake tools are running under the GUI thread, which makes no requirement on thread-safety. Technically we do not need to run it in a stroke / in image thread but with no multithreading the tools runs too slowly on some computers (read as “my Thinkpad laptop”) so I am not unwilling to take this extra challenge. In previous posts I described how the strokes work and the problems I encountered. Besides that there are still some problems I need to face.

  • Joaquim Rocha: Whereabouts

    It’s been almost two months since my last day at Endless, and some people keep asking me what am I up to now. The change was nothing top-secret so I told my closest friends and colleagues about what I was doing, but I have been so busy — first with the job change, personal life (whose events I will leave for a later post), then with some vacation time in Portugal, and this past week with my son’s first days in the Kindergarten — that I kept neglecting writing a post about that.

    I had met Endless when it was still a small startup, in a shared working space in San Francisco, and joined it a few years after that, because it was all I could think about. Having spent almost 4 years with the company, it is and will always be a special place for me, not only because of its mission, but also because of its people and the experiences we shared, and I will keep rooting for their success.

  • Mayank Sharma: GSoC’It has rightly been said - “All good things come to an end”. Google Summer of Code too was one of the good experiences I’ve had, in the sense

    It has rightly been said - “All good things come to an end”. Google Summer of Code too was one of the good experiences I’ve had, in the sense that I didn’t know anything about the Open Source world. It provided the exact platform that I needed to kickstart my open source contributions and to let me feet as fantastic a community as GNOME.

KDE and GNOME GSoC Reports

Filed under
KDE
Google
GNOME
  • Day 92 – The last day

    After the second coding period, I was in the begin of the backend development. I’ll list and explain what was made in this period. After GSoC, I’ll still work on Khipu to move it out from Beta soon, then, I’ll fix the bugs and try to implement the things that are missing and new features.

  • Millan Castro Vilariño: GSoC: Final report

    Google Summer of Code 2019 has come to an end. This post is part of my final submission. It summarizes my contribution to Pitivi, providing links to my work.

    My proposal consisted on a interval time system with different applications for Pitivi video editor. Originally, one of the applications would be to be able to set up markers at selected positions in the timeline, to store user metada.

    After the first discussions it was clear that the core of the whole problem would be to implement the markers abstraction in GES (GStreamer Editing Services). They could store the information about position and duration needed. This was the base of my work.

  • Final Report for Google SoC'19

    The ultimate goal of my project was to redesign and redevelop the GTK’s official website https://gtk.org by providing it a design that follows current trends and content updation that really matters to the users and developers by using modern static site generators. This website uses Gitlab CI for deployment purposes. The project is a major milestone belonging to the release of GTK 4.0.

GNOME Feeds is a Simple RSS Reader for Linux Desktops

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GNOME

Feedreader, Liferea, and Thunderbird are three of the most popular desktop RSS readers for Linux, but now there’s a new option on the scene.

GNOME Feeds app is simple, no-frills desktop RSS reader for Linux systems. It doesn’t integrate or sync with a cloud-based service, like Feedly or Inoreader, but you can import a list of feeds via an .opml file.

“Power” users of RSS feeds will likely find that GNOME Feeds a little too limited for their needs. But the lean feature set is, arguably, what will make this app appeal to more casual users.

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Welcome to the August 2019 Friends of GNOME Update!

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GNOME

Neil, Molly, and Rosanna went to OSCON, in Portland, OR. While there, we met with people from other free software projects and companies developing open source, or with open source programs offices. Following OSCON, there was the West Coast Hackfest, during which the Documentation, GTK, and Engagement teams met and got a bunch of work done. There are some photos you can check out on our Twitter account.

Molly attended FrOSCon, giving a keynote entitled “Open Source Citizenship for Everyone!” On September 17th, Molly will be at GitLab Commit in Brooklyn, NY.

Federico Mena will be at CCOSS in Guadalajara, México, September 14 – 15th. There he will run a workshop on GNOME and deliver a keynote presentation.

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Quick Guide to The Awesome GNOME Disk Utility

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GNOME

GNOME Disk Utility is an awesome tool to maintain hard disk drives that shipped with Ubuntu. It's called simply "Disks" on start menu on 19.04, anyway. It's able to format hard disks and USB sticks, create and remove partitions, rename partitions, and check disk health. Not only that, it also features writing ISO into disk and vice versa, create ISO image of a disk. This tutorial explains in brief how to use it for 8 purposes. Let's go!

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Linux Virtual Machine App GNOME Boxes Has An Awesome Time-Saving Feature You Should Know About

Filed under
GNU
Linux
GNOME

Not only did GNOME Boxes automatically detect that the ISO contained Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, it offered me an Express Install option (provided I had a working internet connection). The app automatically pulled my username into the account field, and asked that I do nothing more than enter a password to proceed.

And that was truly all that it required, unless I needed to customize the amount of RAM and disk space allocated to the VM.

After hitting the Continue button, GNOME Boxes ran an unattended installation. It pulled regional and language settings from my host machine, handled the partitioning dialogue, and everything else. The installation screens zoomed by, components and updates were downloaded, and within less than 5 minutes I had a perfectly working Ubuntu 18.04 to play with.

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Meet the GNOMEies: Max Huang

Filed under
Interviews
GNOME

Max Huang has been GNOME since 2010, starting with forming a GNOME users group in Taiwan. Max has a story you may understand: being a user, meeting the right person, and slowly finding yourself more and more deeply involved with a community in terms of working together and making friends.

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Marked by the Red Hat Product Security team as having a security impact of "Important," the new Linux kernel security update is here to patch a memory corruption (CVE-2018-9568) that occurred due to incorrect socket cloning and a NULL pointer dereference (CVE-2019-11810) discovered in drivers/scsi/megaraid/megaraid_sas_base.c, which could lead to a denial of service. Also fixed in this update are two bugs affecting the performance of the Linux kernel on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and CentOS Linux 6 systems, namely a fragmented packets timing out issue and the backport TCP follow-up for small buffers. These two bugs can be corrected if you install the new kernel versions for your operating system. Read more

CAN-Bus HAT for Raspberry Pi 4 offers RTC and wide-range power

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