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GNOME 3.33.92 (GNOME 3.34rc2) RELEASED

Filed under
GNOME

Hi,

The second release candidate for 3.34 is here! Remember this is the
end of this development cycle; enjoy it as fast as you can, the final
release is scheduled next Wednesday!

Also, the 3.34beta flatpak runtime has been pushed to flathub if you
want to give it a try. We will try to make it available sooner on the
next cycle. Currently the architectures supported are:
- x86_64 (with the new extension to run 32bit software)
- aarch64
- armv7

We remind you we are string frozen, no string changes may be made
without confirmation from the l10n team (gnome-i18n@) and notification
to both the release team and the GNOME Documentation Project
(gnome-doc-list@).

Hard code freeze is also in place, no source code changes can be made
without approval from the release-team.  Translation and documentation
can continue.

If you want to compile GNOME 3.33.92, you can use the official
BuildStream project snapshot. Thanks to BuildStream's build
sandbox, it should build reliably for you regardless of the
dependencies on your host system:

https://download.gnome.org/teams/releng/3.33.92/gnome-3.33.92.tar.xz

The list of updated modules and changes is available here:

https://download.gnome.org/core/3.33/3.33.92/NEWS

The source packages are available here:

https://download.gnome.org/core/3.33/3.33.92/sources/

Read more

Also: GNOME 3.34 RC2 Available For Final Testing Of This Big Desktop Update

Molly de Blanc: Goodbye, GUADEC!

Join the Linux App Summit in Barcelona!

Filed under
KDE
GNOME

As many of you will know we, at KDE and together with GNOME, are organising the Linux App Summit (LAS for short). It will be in Barcelona between the 12th and 15th November.

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GNOME Shell 3.33.92

Filed under
GNOME

About GNOME Shell
=================

GNOME Shell provides core user interface functions for the GNOME 3
desktop, like switching to windows and launching applications. GNOME
Shell takes advantage of the capabilities of modern graphics hardware
and introduces innovative user interface concepts to provide a
visually attractive and easy to use experience.

Tarball releases are provided largely for distributions to build
packages. If you are interested in building GNOME Shell from source,
we would recommend building from version control using the build
script described at:

 https://wiki.gnome.org/Projects/GnomeShell

Not only will that give you the very latest version of this rapidly
changing project, it will be much easier than get GNOME Shell and its
dependencies to build from tarballs.

News
====

* Animate pointer a11y pie timer [Jonas D.; !688]
* Fix restarting shell in systemd user session [Benjamin; !690]
* Misc. bug fixes and cleanups [Florian, Jonas D., Jonas Å., Will;
  !691, !689, !692, #1552, !698]

Contributors:
  Jonas Ådahl, Benjamin Berg, Piotr Drąg, Jonas Dreßler, Florian Müllner,
  Will Thompson

Translators:
  Daniel Șerbănescu [ro], Danial Behzadi [fa], Daniel Mustieles [es],
  Jiri Grönroos [fi], Asier Sarasua Garmendia [eu], Piotr Drąg [pl],
  Rūdolfs Mazurs [lv], Anders Jonsson [sv], Fran Dieguez [gl], Jordi Mas [ca],
  Matej Urbančič [sl], Zander Brown [en_GB], Ryuta Fujii [ja], Tim Sabsch [de],
  Fabio Tomat [fur], Pawan Chitrakar [ne], A S Alam [pa], Changwoo Ryu [ko],
  Aurimas Černius [lt], Daniel Rusek [cs], Marek Černocký [cs],
  Kukuh Syafaat [id], Goran Vidović [hr], Rafael Fontenelle [pt_BR]

Read more

Also: Mutter 3.33.92

Last Minute Shell & Mutter Changes Ready For Testing Ahead Of GNOME 3.34

Events: GUADEC 2019 and Linux Plumbers Conference

Filed under
GNU
Linux
GNOME
  • Robert Ancell: GUADEC 2019 - Thessaloniki

    This year we had seven people from Canonical Ubuntu desktop team in attendance. Many other companies and projects had representatives (including Collabora, Elementary OS, Endless, Igalia, Purism, RedHat, SUSE and System76). I think this was the most positive GUADEC I've attended, with people from all these organizations actively leading discussions and a general consideration of each other as we try and maximise where we can collaborate. 

    Of course, the community is much bigger than a group of companies. In particular is was great to meet Carlo and Frederik from the Yaru theme project. They've been doing amazing work on a new theme for Ubuntu and it will be great to see it land in a future release.

    In the annual report there was a nice surprise; I made the most merge requests this year! I think this is a reflection on the step change in productivity in GNOME since switching to GitLab. So now I have a challenge to maintain that for next year...

  • Linux Plumbers Conference: LPC waiting list closed; just a few days until the conference

    The waiting list for this year’s Linux Plumbers Conference is now closed. All of the spots available have been allocated, so anyone who is not registered at this point will have to wait for next year. There will be no on-site registration. We regret that we could not accommodate everyone. The good news is that all of the microconferences, refereed talks, Kernel summit track, and Networking track will be recorded on video and made available as soon as possible after the conference. Anyone who could not make it to Lisbon this year will at least be able to catch up with what went on. Hopefully those who wanted to come will make it to a future LPC.

  • Linux Plumbers Conference waiting list closed; just a few days until the conference

    The Linux Plumbers Conference has filled up and has closed its waiting list.

Allan Day: Towards a UX Strategy for GNOME (Part 1)

Filed under
GNOME

At the recent GUADEC in Thessaloniki, I gave a talk about some strands of work that I’ve been doing around UX strategy and design/development process. I ended up skipping over some points that I’d wanted to make, and I also had some great conversations with people about the talk afterwards, so I wanted to share an updated version of the talk in blog form.

I’ll be splitting the talk into multiple posts. This first post is about creating a UX strategy for GNOME. As you might expect, this is a plan for how to improve GNOME’s user experience! In particular, it tries to answer the question of which areas and features need to be prioritised.

The approach I’ve taken in creating this strategy follows a fairly standard format: analyse the market, research user needs, identify and analyse competitors, then use that data to design a product which will succeed in the current desktop market. The main goal is to offer a product which meets user needs better than the alternatives.

In later posts in the series, I’m going to show off a set of updated designs for GNOME, which I think are a good place to start implementing the strategy that I’m laying out. For many readers, those later posts will probably be more interesting! However, I do think it’s useful to provide the strategy, in order to provide background and put that work in context.

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What to Expect in GNOME 3.34 and Thessaloniki GUADEC Reports

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GNOME
  • What to Expect in GNOME 3.34, Out Next Week

    The GNOME 3.34 release is set for an early September release, and it’ll ship with a sizeable set of new features and changes in tow.

    Among the new stuff that GNOME 3.34 brings, which millions of desktop Linux users can look out for, is easier app folder creation, a entirely revamped system profiling tool, and power ups for a crop of core apps.

    In short, GNOME 3.34 is a substantial yet iterative upgrade that buffs some of this free desktop’s rougher edges, particularly in so-called problem areas like animations and frame rates.

    There’s plenty more to talk about so read on to snare a sneak peek at the best new features in GNOME 3.34!

  • Will Thompson: γυαδεκ? χκπτγεδ?

    GUADEC in Thessaloniki was a great experience, as ever. Thank you once again to the GNOME Foundation for sponsoring my attendence!

  • Adrien Plazas: GUADEC 2019

    I attended Christian's talk about designing multi-process apps, it sparked the interest of Alexander Mikhaylenko who rapidly started playing with these concepts, as we plan since a long time to run Libretro cores in a subprocess in GNOME Games.

    Lubosz presented his work on the VR Linux desktop. Even better, he demoed it, and the next day it was possible to test it in the corridor! So I did, and it was pretty amusing.

Geometric Picking Finally Lands In GNOME/Mutter 3.34 For Lowering CPU Usage

Filed under
GNOME

In addition to Mutter seeing today an important last minute performance fix for the NVIDIA proprietary driver, Mutter also saw a long-standing performance optimization finally land for GNOME 3.34 that benefits all hardware/drivers.

The optimization is another patch series worked on by Canonical's Daniel van Vugt over the past year but finally saw its way into Mutter Git today ahead of next week's GNOME 3.34.

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Maps and GNOME 3.34

Filed under
GNOME

Just released Maps 3.33.92, the last beta release before the GNOME 3.34.0 release next week.

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Bastian Ilsø Hougaard: GNOME Developer Documentation – The Bottom-Up Approach

Filed under
Development
GNOME

This year’s GUADEC took place in Greece – six days vacation with plenty of time to dive into GNOME again (I missed you!).

When I last posted in January, I talked about my new full-time employment at Aalborg University as Research Assistant. Unfortunately it has left me little time to continue release videos or developer documentation. So at GUADEC 2019, I decided to re-visit the developer documentation issue, with a different approach to contributing to a better experience and that’s what this blog post is about.

The “ideal” GNOME developer portal has been the conception of a top-down approach: Creating a coherent structured platform, which collects documentation in one place. The challenge is that providing platforms require a lot of legwork and coordination – something which we in the past months have not had. So until we have it, I have been wanting to focus the time I had at GUADEC on a bottom-up approach: Providing GNOME developer documentation, where new developers look for them: on “Google” (and other web search engines). Arguably, people employ several strategies to find answers to questions, my own experience is that searching the web, remains consistently one of the most prominent strategies to get answers to any programming and app development.

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GNOME/GTK: GTK BoF at Guadec, Rust Hackfest in Berlin and Pitivi GSoC 2019 Final Report

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GNOME
  • Matthias Clasen: GTK BoF at Guadec

    We also discussed things outside GTK proper that will keep applications from porting to GTK4. This includes commonly used libraries such as GtkSourceView, vte and webkitgtk, which all will need GTK4 ports before applications that depend on them can be ported. Some of this work is already underway; but any help in this area is appreciated!

    Another potential blocker for GTK4 porting is platform support. The GL renderer works well on Linux; the Vulkan renderer needs some fixups. On Windows we currently use cairo fallback, which may be good enough for 4.0. Alternatively, we could merge existing work for using the GL renderer with ANGLE. The situation is less pleasant on OS X, where we don’t have a working backend; if you want to help us here, the first still would be to adapt the GDK backend to changes in GDK.

  • GTK 4.0 Isn't Expected To Be Released Until Autumn 2020

    GTK 4.0 won't be out this year, nor is it expected next spring as part of the GNOME 3.36 cycle, but now the developers believe this next major tool-kit update will be ready to ship in just over one year's time with the autumn release of GNOME 3.38.

    Taking place the past few days was GNOME's annual GUADEC conference where understandably were a lot of discussions around GTK4.

  • Julian Sparber: Rust Hackfest in Berlin

    It was a lot of fun hanging out with all the GNOME people who were in Berlin for this. I unfortunately had some unexpected deadlines from my University. Therefore I couldn’t hack as much as I wanted but I still got a couple of things done.

    I spent most of the time on an example which shows how to implement drag and drop reordering of rows in a GtkListbox which is bound to a ListModel. Sadly I didn’t have the time to fix the few reaming issues (mostly commenting the code), therefore it’s not yet merged. This is the pull request to gtk-rs.

  • Swayamjeet Swain: GSoC 2019 Final Report

    This year I worked on Pitivi, an Open Source Video Editor. With GSoC coming to an end, this post is a brief summary of the tasks that were done during the period, the things that were implemented, the work that is ongoing and the future plans that are left to do.

    My project involved implementing Nesting Timelines in Pitivi, such that the clips can be easily nested to form one single clip.

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