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GNOME

GNOME: Alternative GNOME Shell Application Menu Extensions and GSoC Projects

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GNOME

  • Alternative GNOME Shell Application Menu Extensions

    GNOME shell comes with a dashboard-like application menu layout by default. The default layout features a spacious, grid-like layout, search bar, and large icons for easy accessibility. Linux users who have used Unity or macOS application menus would find this menu familiar. This article will cover a few application menu extensions that can be used as alternatives for the default menu in the GNOME shell.

  • Ayush Mittal: Pitivi: Making the Render dialog usable: Render profiles

    It’s been around two months when I officially became a GSOC student Developer at Pitivi and now, the 1st coding month has completed. Although we had a structured proposal to follow during GSOC, we adapted as per what looked much more suitable and made more sense. If you have been using Pitivi, you are in for a surprise.

  • Alejandro Domínguez: Fractal: Update progress

    It’s being a busy month, but productive nonetheless!

    Since the last update about how things were going most of the error handling stuff has been reworked, as announced. There are a few bits remaining but they are in very specific places that require prior work in other areas. The approach chosen was to have a common trait that handled the error and each backend function now has a (mostly) specific error type that implements that said trait. Managing errors for new requests is as easy as creating a new type for the error that indicates all possible cases, composing over foreign error types if required, and implementing the trait HandleError to manage how the error should be shown in the GUI and/or logged, or just marking the trait if the default implementation is good enough.

  • Refactoring Pitivi's Media Library

    Since my GSoC project is about improving Pitivi’s Media Library and introducing new features to it, the first task was to clean it up.

    To display assets the Media Library used a Gtk.TreeView widget to show a detailed list view and a Gtk.IconView widget to show a simpler icon view. Some major drawbacks with the previous implementation using two separate widgets are:

Events: DebianDay, GUADEC 2020 and OpenSUSE + LibreOffice

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GNOME
Debian
SUSE
  • Let's celebrate DebianDay 2020 around the world

    We encourage our community to celebrate around the world the 27th Debian anniversary with organized [DebianDay][1] events. This year due to the COVID-19 pandemic we cannot organize in-person events, so we ask instead that contributors, developers, teams, groups, maintainers, and users promote The Debian Project and Debian activities online on August 16th (and/or 15th).

    Communities can organize a full schedule of online activities throughout the day. These activities can include talks, workshops, active participation with contributions such as translations assistance or editing, debates, BoFs, and all of this in your local language using tools such as [Jitsi][2] for capturing audio and video from presenters for later streaming to YouTube.

    If you are not aware of any local community organizing a full event or you don't want to join one, you can solo design your own activity using [OBS][3] and stream it to YouTube. You can watch an OBS tutorial [here][4].

    Don't forget to record your activity as it will be a nice idea to upload it to [Peertube][5] later.

  • GUADEC 2020 Kicks Off Today as GNOME’s First Virtual Conference

    The GUADEC 2020 (GNOME Users And Developers European Conference) event kicks off today until July 28th as GNOME’s first online conference in the coronavirus era.

    The time has come for the summer Linux conferences to open their doors to virtual visitors, and GUDEC 2020 is the first major Linux conference to switch to an online format. The event was supposed to take place in Zacatecas, Mexico, but as you can imagine, everyone is adapting every day to respond to the needs created by the COVID-19 crisis, which affects us all.

    GUADEC 2020 is the place where GNOME users and developers from all over the world gather together to share knowledge and discuss upcoming features of the next major release of the GNOME desktop environment, which is used by numerous Linux-based operating systems, including Ubuntu, Debian, openSUSE, Fedora, and many others.

  • openSUSE + LibreOffice Virtual Conference Extends Call for Papers

    Organizers of the openSUSE + LibreOffice Virtual Conference are extending the Call for Papers to August 4.

    Participants can submit talks for the live conference past the original deadline of July 21 for the next two weeks.

    The conference is scheduled to take place online from Oct. 15. - 17.

    The length of the talks that can be submitted are either a 15-minute short talk, a 30-minute normal talk and/or a 60-minute work group session. Organizers believe shortening the talks will keep attendees engaged for the duration of the online conference.

Sam Thursfield: Tracker at GUADEC 2020

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GNOME

GNOME’s conference is online this year, for obvious reasons. I spent the last 3 month teaching online classes so hopefully I’m prepared! I’m sad that there’s no Euro-trip this year and we can’t hang out in the pub, but nice that we’re saving hundreds of plane journeys.

There will be two talks related to Tracker: Carlos and I speaking about Tracker 3 (Friday 23rd July, 16.45 UTC), and myself on how to deal with challanges of working on GNOME’s session-wide daemons (Thursday 22nd July, 16.45 UTC). There are plenty of other fascinating talks, including inevitably one scheduled the same time as ours which you should, of course, watch as a replay during the break

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Jussi Pakkanen: The ABI stability matryoshka

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Development
GNOME

Going from this we can find out the actual underlying problem, which is running programs of two different ABI versions at the same time on the same OS. The simple solution of rebuilding the world from scratch does not work. It could be done for the base platform but, due to business and other reasons, you can't enforce a rebuild of all user applications (and those users, lest we forget, pay a very hefty amount of money to OS vendors for the platform their apps run on). Mixing new and old ABI apps is fragile and might fail due to the weirdest of reasons no matter how careful you are. The problem is even more difficult in "rolling release" cases where you can't easily rebuild the entire world in one go such as Debian unstable, but we'll ignore that case for now.

It turns out that there already exists a solution for doing exactly this: Flatpak. Its entire reason of existance is to run binaries with different ABI (and even API) on a given Linux platform while making it appear as if it was running on the actual host. There are other ways of achieving the same, such as Docker or systemd-nspawn, but they aim to isolate the two things from each other rather than unifying them. Thus a potential solution to the problem is that whenever an OS breaks ABI compatibility in a major way (which should be rare, like once every few years) it should provide the old ABI version of itself as a Flatpak and run legacy applications that way.

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Also: Apoorv Sachan: The Second Milestone

Download Now: Get GNOME 3.38’s New Default Wallpapers Right Now

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GNOME

Just don’t expect much of a deviation on what’s gone before. What’s that saying again? Ah yes, “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it”.

Jakub Steiner’s GNOME 3.38 wallpaper sits in vogue with previous background designs. It is predominately blue, it features a variety of geometric shapes, and uses fractal lighting for texture and effect.

As with the GNOME 3.36 wallpaper and earlier there are 3 distinct variations of the main design: morning, day, and night. You can use each of these on their own, or use them as part of a dynamic wallpaper slideshow that subtly transitions between then over the course of the day...

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GNOME, KDE, libvirt Packages Update in Tumbleweed

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KDE
GNOME
SUSE

The desktops had a big week of updates in openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots this week.

Among the packages updated for the desktops this week were GNOME’s 3.36.4 version and the July 7 release of KDE’s Plasma 5.19.3, Applications 20.04.3 and the July 4 release of Frameworks 5.72.0.

Tumbleweed snapshots are trending stable this week and snapshot 20200714 is trending at a 99 rating, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer. Both Frameworks and Applications were in the most recent snapshot. Applications had updates for the open-source video editing software Kdenlive. Fixes were made to new clips that could possibly crash and/or make clips disappear. The Akonadi storage framework had a server fix for the fetching of attributes with empty data; the topic need to be revisited, according to the commit. Frameworks 5.72.0 added a new DAV protocol implementation with KJobs. KDE’s input/output system library KIO and the user interface builder Kirigami had multiple updates. The Kirigami update provided better collapsing handling for UI and better presentation for list header items. The virtualization package Xen had a small update for its 4.13.1 version to fix incorrect error handling in event channel port allocation; A few patches were added and a handful of Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures were addressed. The hxtools collection of tools and scripts updated to 20200712 and added a new utility for arpeggio/polyphonic mixing of bsvplay/qplay outputs. Rubygem also had several different packages updated in the snapshot.

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GNOME and KDE: Official Merch Shop, FOSS-North Video Editing and KStars

Filed under
KDE
GNOME

  • GNOME Opens an Official Merch Shop

    The GNOME Shop is a new, official storefront. It stocks a range of GNOME branded items, including t-shirts, hoodies, socks, and (topically) colourful face masks – all bearing the famous lone foot logo.

    GNOME says it’s using a ‘print on demand’ company to fulfil orders and that all products ‘are unique and producer per order’.

    “Due to this, and the limitations of our print suppliers, returns or exchanges are not supported for incorrect order issues such as wrong size or color,” they add.

    So what’s available?

    Well, a simple grey v-neck mens t-shirt sporting the GNOME logo will set you back a cool $25 and is available in sizes XS through to 3XL. A navy “Cruiser Logo Hoodie” costs just over double that at $55 and it is available in sizes up to 2XL.

  • foss-north kdenlive workflow

    As some of you might already have noticed, we’ve complemented foss-north with a new pod / vod / vlog – I’m not sure what to call it. Basically, it is a video based pod cast (making it available as a audio only pod-cast is high on the todo). Our main focus right now is a series on licenses and copyright, but there is more to come.

    As a part of this, I’ve started editing videos in kdenlive on a weekly basis, and I’m very happy with it so far.

    In this blog, I want to share my workflow. It is probably far from ideal, but it does the work for me.

  • Weekly Report 5: Qt3D based backend for KStars

    In the sixth week of GSoC, I worked on adding mouseevents and integrate the custom qt3d window with existing skymap

GNOME Development and Projects

Filed under
Development
GNOME

  • Jan Schmidt: OpenHMD and the Oculus Rift

    In short, OpenHMD is a project providing open drivers for various VR headsets through a single simple API. I don’t know of any other project that provides support for as many different headsets as OpenHMD, so it’s the logical place to contribute for largest effect.

    OpenHMD is supported as a backend in Monado, and in SteamVR via the SteamVR-OpenHMD plugin. Working drivers in OpenHMD opens up a range of VR games – as well as non-gaming applications like Blender. I think it’s important that Linux and friends not get left behind – in what is basically a Windows-only activity right now.

    One downside is that does come with the usual disadvantages of an abstraction API, in that it doesn’t fully expose the varied capabilities of each device, but instead the common denominator. I hope we can fix that in time by extending the OpenHMD API, without losing its simplicity.

  • Philip Withnall: Startup time profiling of gnome-software

    Following on from the heap profiling I did on gnome-software to try and speed it up for Endless, the next step was to try profiling the computation done when starting up gnome-software — which bits of code are taking time to run?

  • Ole Aamot: Record Audio as Ogg Vorbis in GNOME Gingerblue

    GNOME Gingerblue will be a Free Software program for musicians who would compose, record and share original music to the Internet from the GNOME Desktop.

    The project isn’t yet ready for distribution with GNOME 3 and the GUI and features such as meta tagging and Internet uploads must be implemented.

  • Kavan Mevada: Sound Recorder to modern HIG II

    Yay, new changes also added in Sound Recorder. Another blog for new recent changes.

    This snapshot, of application is at almost stable usable for daily life, cause we added back delete and rename button those temporarily removed.

    In this snapshot three new cool features are added "Pause Recording" and "Cancel Recording".

    Pause recording: Before this added people were recording whole long single recording, even they not wanna record some part, cause they couldn't able to pause recording. They were doing extra steps and using other apps to remove part of the unwanted recording. Now it's a big relief for them.

  • Chinmay Gurjar: Chapter 2: Passes the first Mountain

    It has been a month since the coding period has begun. And it is going great, we have managed to get most of the work for the first milestone done. This month’s work included adding support for DLNA sources to Music, so that it can list and play media from the DLNA server.

    FIRST THINGS FIRST !

    What is DLNA and DLNA media server? Digital Living Network Alliance, or as we know it, DLNA, is a set of rules and specs that specifies standards and guidelines for media streaming devices. DLNA-compatible devices use UPnP(Universal Plug and Play) to communicate with other DLNA devices.

    Once a DLNA media server is plugged into a “Home Network”(LAN), it can browse, open/play, search, download or upload any type of media for you. I’m using Rygel as a DLNA server, and for all the testing.

Molly de Blanc: (Some) Highlights from GUADEC

Filed under
GNOME

I positively adore my coworkers. I’ll spare you how great they are, and instead focus on some of the talks they’ll be giving.

GKT Core Developer Emmanuele Bassi will be giving two talks: Being a GNOME Maintainer: Best Practices and Known Traps and Archaeology of Accessibility. Being a GNOME Maintainer will discuss what it means to be a GNOME maintainer, and Archaeology of Accessibility will be a technical deep dive into the accessibility work Emmanuele and others have been doing around accessibility. (Note: “Accessibility” refers to the ability of technology to accommodate the needs of users who have disabilities, visual impairments, etc.)

Melissa Wu, who is organizing the Community Engagement Challenge, will give two sessions as well. In her first, Remember What It’s Like to Be New to GNOME, she’ll talk about her experience coming to the GNOME community only a few months ago, getting to know people, and making things happen.

Melissa will also join me for A Year of Strategic Initiatives at GNOME, during which we’ll talk about a range of things that have happened at GNOME over the past year (and some future plans), with a focus on organizational sustainability and the initiatives that make us excited to work here.

Executive Director Neil McGovern will lead the Annual General Meeting, to provide everyone with an overview of what we’ve been doing and what we will do, and answer your questions.

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GNOME: Cover Thumbnailer and 4K

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GNOME
  • Cover Thumbnailer Shows Folder Thumbnails For Image And Music Directories (Nautilus, Caja, Thunar)

    For music folders (needs to have cover.jpg/png inside the folder), the application lets you choose the thumbnail resize method (crop or preserve), and if to allow mosaic or not. For the pictures folder, you can choose the maximum number of pictures to show on the thumbnail. Besides the default Pictures and Music folders, you can add extra folders, and ignore folders if you wish.

  • GNOME Optimizations Continue In Striving For Faster 4K Experience

    Canonical's Daniel Van Vugt has been engaged in several weeks now in optimizing GNOME for a faster 4K experience particularly when using Intel graphics but many of these optimizations pan out for other GPUs and resolutions too. Over the past week he's been working on yet more optimizations.

    We have been reporting on many of Daniel's significant performance optimizations and he's seemingly had no shortage of finding areas to optimize. As part of his status update for the weekly Ubuntu desktop team reports, Daniel noted, "Continued progress toward making 4K (or any resolution) faster and smoother..."

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SPDX for KF5/KF6 Status Update

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