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GNOME

GNOME 3.34

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GNOME
  • Introducing GNOME 3.34: “Thessaloniki”

    GNOME 3.34 is the latest version of GNOME 3, and is the result of 6 months’ hard work by the GNOME community. It contains major new features, as well as many smaller improvements and bug fixes. In total, the release incorporates 23929 changes, made by approximately 777 contributors.
    3.34 has been named “Thessaloniki” in recognition of this year’s GUADEC organizing team. GUADEC is GNOME’s primary annual conference and is only possible due to the amazing work of local volunteers. This year’s event was held in Thessaloniki, Greece, and was a big success. Thank you, Team Thessaloniki!

  • GNOME 3.34 Released

    The latest version of GNOME 3 has been released today. Version 3.34 contains six months of work by the GNOME community and includes many improvements, performance improvements and new features.

  • GNOME 3.34 released
    The GNOME Project is proud to announce the release of GNOME 3.34, Θεσσαλονίκη
    (Thessaloniki).
    
    This release brings performance improvements in the shell, Drag-And-Drop in
    the overview, improved mouse and keybord accessibility, previews in the
    background panel, support for systemd user sessions, and more.
    
    Improvements to core GNOME applications include new icons, sandboxed browsing
    in Web, gapless playback in Music, support for bidirectional text in the
    Terminal, more featured applications in Software, and more.
    
    For more information about the changes in GNOME 3.34, you can visit
    the release notes:
    
     https://help.gnome.org/misc/release-notes/3.34/
    
    GNOME 3.34 will be available shortly in many distributions. If you want
    to try it today, you can use the Fedora 31 beta that will be available soon
    or the openSUSE nightly live images which include GNOME 3.34.
    
     https://www.gnome.org/getting-gnome/
     http://download.fedoraproject.org/pub/fedora/linux/development/31/Workstation/x86_64/iso/
     http://download.opensuse.org/repositories/GNOME:/Medias/images/iso/?P=GNOME_Next*
    
    To try the very latest developments in GNOME, you can also use Fedora
    Silverblue, whose rawhide branch always includes the latest GNOME packages.
    
     https://kojipkgs.fedoraproject.org/compose/rawhide/latest-Fedora-Rawhide/compose/Silverblue/x86_64/iso/
    
    If you are interested in building applications for GNOME 3.34, you can
    use the GNOME 3.34 Flatpak SDK, which is available in the sdk.gnome.org
    repository.
    
    This six-month effort wouldn't have been possible without the whole
    GNOME community, made of contributors and friends from all around the
    world: developers, designers, documentation writers, usability and
    accessibility specialists, translators, maintainers, students, system
    administrators, companies, artists, testers and last, but not least,
    our users.
    
    GNOME would not exist without all of you. Thank you to everyone!
    
    Our next release, GNOME 3.36, is planned for March 2020. Until then,
    enjoy GNOME 3.34!
    
     the GNOME Release Team
    
  • GNOME 3.34 Released With Its Many Performance Improvements & Better Wayland Support

    Red Hat developer Matthias Clasen has just announced the release of GNOME 3.34 as this widely anticipated update to the GNOME 3 desktop environment.

    Making GNOME 3.34 particularly exciting is the plethora of optimizations/fixes in tow with this six-month update. Equally exciting are a ton of improvements and additions around the Wayland support to ensure its performance and feature parity to X11. GNOME 3.34 also brings other improvements line sandboxed browsing with Epiphany, GNOME Music enhancements, GNOME Software improvements, nd a ton of other refinements throughout GNOME Shell, Mutter, and the many GNOME applications.

  • GNOME 3.34 Desktop Environment Officially Released, Here's What's New

    The GNOME Project announced today the release and general availability of the highly anticipated GNOME 3.34 desktop environment for Linux-based operating systems.

    GNOME 3.34 is dubbed "Thessaloniki" after the host city of the GUADEC (GNOME User and Developer European Conference) 2019 event and it's a major release that adds numerous new features and improvements. It's been in development of the past six months and comes as a drop-in replacement for the GNOME 3.32 "Taipei" desktop environment series with many new features.

    "The latest version of GNOME 3 has been released today. Version 3.34 contains six months of work by the GNOME community and includes many improvements, performance improvements and new features," reads today's announcement. "Highlights from this release include visual refreshes for a number of applications, including the desktop itself. The background selection settings also received a redesign, making it easier to select custom backgrounds."

  • GNOME 3.34 Released with “Drastically Improved” Responsiveness

    And it’s here; the new GNOME 3.34 release is now officially available, six months after development first began.

    And the biggest change on offer in GNOME 3.34 isn’t one you can see, but it is one you can feel: speed.

    Now, yes: each new release of this particular desktop environment comes carrying claims of “faster” or “better performance”. And those claims don’t always feel accurate.

GNOME and KDE Leftovers

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • GNOME Shell Picks Up Performance Improvements For Extensions

    While days too late for squeezing into GNOME 3.34.0, the GNOME Shell has landed a one year old merge request providing various fixes and performance improvements to its extension system.

    This MR was finally honored providing performance improvements around extensions, particularly those with a longer setup/start-up process.

  • Kate got submitted to the Windows Store

    Since a few years Kate is working well on Windows. You can grab fresh installers since then from our download page.

    But the visibility of it was very low for Windows users.

  • FOSS painting program Krita now has the Linux version on Steam

    Okay, not exactly gaming news but good to see anyway. Krita, the high quality FOSS painting program now has a Linux version available on Steam.

    They made a bit of a splash about releasing the Linux version on Steam too, in their announcement they mentioned how they're proud of it being "free, open source and community-driven software" with the Steam release meant as another direct way to support the development since it requires a purchase.

Debian 10 Buster with GNOME 3: I didn't expect it to be this fast, but that could be the SSD talking

Filed under
GNOME
Debian

I don’t know how much of it is Debian 10 and how much is swapping a 5400-RPM hard drive with an M.2 NVMe SSD, but my 2-year-old laptop is FLYING now that I’ve ditched Windows 10 and the 1 GB magnetic drive that came with it.

And this is with GNOME 3. The stock or lightly/heavily-favored desktop environment in Debian, Fedora and Ubuntu looks great, runs with no hesitation (in constrast to Windows 10) and doesn’t have me thinking that I need anything else for speed-related reasons.

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GNOME 3.36 Desktop Environment Slated for Release on March 11th, 2020

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GNOME

While the GNOME 3.34 desktop environment is not out yet, as it is expected to be officially unveiled tomorrow, September 12th, the GNOME developers are already planning on next major release, GNOME 3.36, which is currently slated for release on March 11th, 2020.

Development of the GNOME 3.36 desktop environment, which will be available under the GNOME 3.35.x umbrella, will start with the first snapshot, GNOME 3.35.1, which is scheduled for public testing release on October 12th. It will followed by a second development snapshot, GNOME 3.35.2, on November 23rd.

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Also: GNOME 3.36 Pegged For Release On 11 March, More Stable Point Releases Come To GNOME

Changes: GNOME 3.35/3.36 release schedule

Allan Day: Towards a UX Strategy for GNOME (Part 2)

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GNOME

This post is a part of a short series, in which I’m setting out what I think could be the beginnings of a UX strategy for GNOME. In this, the second post, I’m going to describe a potential GNOME UX strategy in high-level terms. These goals are a response to the research and analysis that was described in the previous post and, it is hoped, point the way forward for how GNOME can achieve new success in the desktop market.

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GSConnect Update Lets You Control Android Music Apps from Your Desktop + More

Filed under
KDE
GNOME

A new version of the GSConnect extension for GNOME Shell desktops is now available, and it’s packing a couple of nifty changes.

If you’ve not heard of GSConnect before then it’s best to think of it as a bridge between Android and Ubuntu.

As when the GSConnect extension is installed locally and paired with an Android phone running the KDE Connect Android app, a bunch of neat integrations are possible e.g., transfer files to and from Android, sync clipboard, send and receive SMS, see Android notifications, and even use a phone touchscreen as a trackpad for the desktop!

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Vertical Option in Development for Dash to Panel

Filed under
GNOME

If you long for a Dash to Panel vertical option I’ve some seriously good news: one is in development!

The Dash to Dock Vertical implementation is being developed in a separate branch on the desktop dock’s Github, but its developer has already made quick progress.

In Dash to Dock vs Dash to Panel face-off the latter would score higher with me simply because it combines the Top Bar and the “Dash” (what GNOME Shell calls the ‘dock’) into a single panel.

Dash to Panel is neat. It’s tidy. And when paired with a traditional app menu (like the Arc Menu extension) it’s very Cinnamon-esque.

But Dash to Dock can do something that its width-long rival can’t: be placed on any side of the screen.

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Kevin Ottens and Julita Inca at Akademy and GUADEC (KDE, GNOME)

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Sketchnotes at Akademy 2019

    The conference part of this year’s Akademy is now over. Like last year, I did live sketchnoting of all the sessions I attended.

  • Julita Inca: A reason to go to GUADEC

    You may not know much about the GNOME project or the GNOME community. From my experience in the GNOME community for more than eight years, I can list some reasons to get to know more about it...

GNOME 3.33.92 (GNOME 3.34rc2) RELEASED

Filed under
GNOME

Hi,

The second release candidate for 3.34 is here! Remember this is the
end of this development cycle; enjoy it as fast as you can, the final
release is scheduled next Wednesday!

Also, the 3.34beta flatpak runtime has been pushed to flathub if you
want to give it a try. We will try to make it available sooner on the
next cycle. Currently the architectures supported are:
- x86_64 (with the new extension to run 32bit software)
- aarch64
- armv7

We remind you we are string frozen, no string changes may be made
without confirmation from the l10n team (gnome-i18n@) and notification
to both the release team and the GNOME Documentation Project
(gnome-doc-list@).

Hard code freeze is also in place, no source code changes can be made
without approval from the release-team.  Translation and documentation
can continue.

If you want to compile GNOME 3.33.92, you can use the official
BuildStream project snapshot. Thanks to BuildStream's build
sandbox, it should build reliably for you regardless of the
dependencies on your host system:

https://download.gnome.org/teams/releng/3.33.92/gnome-3.33.92.tar.xz

The list of updated modules and changes is available here:

https://download.gnome.org/core/3.33/3.33.92/NEWS

The source packages are available here:

https://download.gnome.org/core/3.33/3.33.92/sources/

Read more

Also: GNOME 3.34 RC2 Available For Final Testing Of This Big Desktop Update

Molly de Blanc: Goodbye, GUADEC!

Join the Linux App Summit in Barcelona!

Filed under
KDE
GNOME

As many of you will know we, at KDE and together with GNOME, are organising the Linux App Summit (LAS for short). It will be in Barcelona between the 12th and 15th November.

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More in Tux Machines

How App Stores Are Addressing Fragmentation in the Linux Ecosystem

According to DistroWatch, 273 Linux distributions are currently active, with another 56 dormant and 521 discontinued. While some of these have shared underpinnings, it still makes for an extremely varied landscape for companies and developers. It means developers must create multiple versions of their applications to be able to provide their software to all Linux users or just address a fraction of the market. Also, developers require multiple versions of build tools, which inevitably results in significant resource overhead. Desktop application distribution is complex across all operating systems in general; in Linux, this is further compounded by such fragmentation and inter-dependencies both in the packaging and distribution of software. For example, Fedora uses the RPM packaging format, while Debian uses the .deb format. Moreover, packages built for one version of a Linux distribution are often incompatible with other versions of the same distribution and need to be built for each version separately. Read more

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (ansible, faad2, linux-4.9, and thunderbird), Fedora (jbig2dec, libextractor, sphinx, and thunderbird), Mageia (expat, kconfig, mediawiki, nodejs, openldap, poppler, thunderbird, webkit2, and wireguard), openSUSE (buildah, ghostscript, go1.12, libmirage, python-urllib3, rdesktop, and skopeo), SUSE (python-Django), and Ubuntu (exim4, ibus, and Wireshark).

  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 161 - Human nature and ad powered open source

    Josh and Kurt start out discussing human nature and how it affects how we view security. A lot of things that look easy are actually really hard. We also talk about the npm library Standard showing command line ads. Are ads part of the future of open source?

  • Skidmap malware drops LKMs on Linux machines to enable cryptojacking, backdoor access

    Researchers have discovered a sophisticated cryptomining program that uses loadable kernel modules (LKMs) to help infiltrate Linux machines, and hides its malicious activity by displaying fake network traffic stats. Dubbed Skidmap, the malware can also grant attackers backdoor access to affected systems by setting up a secret master password that offers access to any user account in the system, according to Trend Micro threat analysts Augusto Remillano II and Jakub Urbanec in a company blog post today. “Skidmap uses fairly advanced methods to ensure that it and its components remain undetected. For instance, its use of LKM rootkits – given their capability to overwrite or modify parts of the kernel – makes it harder to clean compared to other malware,” the blog post states. “In addition, Skidmap has multiple ways to access affected machines, which allow it to reinfect systems that have been restored or cleaned up.”

  • Skidmap Linux Malware Uses Rootkit Capabilities to Hide Cryptocurrency-Mining Payload

    Cryptocurrency-mining malware is still a prevalent threat, as illustrated by our detections of this threat in the first half of 2019. Cybercriminals, too, increasingly explored new platforms and ways to further cash in on their malware — from mobile devices and Unix and Unix-like systems to servers and cloud environments. They also constantly hone their malware’s resilience against detection. Some, for instance, bundle their malware with a watchdog component that ensures that the illicit cryptocurrency mining activities persist in the infected machine, while others, affecting Linux-based systems, utilize an LD_PRELOAD-based userland rootkit to make their components undetectable by system monitoring tools.

Oracle launches completely autonomous operating system

Together, these two solutions provide automated patching, updates, and tuning. This includes 100 percent automatic daily security updates to the Linux kernel and user space library. In addition, patching can be done while the system is running, instead of a sysadmin having to take systems down to patch them. This reduces downtime and helps to eliminate some of the friction between developers and IT, explained Coekaerts. Read more

Software: Zotero, PulseCaster and Qt Port of SFXR

  • Zotero and LibreOffice

    If you’re working with LibreOffice and need to create a bibliography, this software makes it simple to manage your citations. You can tell how few people use LibreOffice’s Bibliography Database by the fact that a bug that would take 10 minutes to fix has survived since 2002. Instead, those who need bibliographies or citations rely on other software such as Zotero, which can be integrated into LibreOffice with an extension. That robust bug is that the Citation Format in the database table is called the Short Name in the input fields. Even more confusing, the examples give an arbitrary name, when to work with the citation insertion tool in Insert | Table of Contents and Index | Insert Bibliography Entry, it should in a standard form, such as (Byfield: 2016) for the MLA format. Add the fact that a single database is used for all files – an absurdity in these memory-rich days – and the neglect of the Bibliography Database is completely understandable.

  • PulseCaster 0.9 released!

    For starters, PulseCaster is now ported to Python 3. I used Python 3.6 and Python 3.7 to do the porting. Nothing in the code should be particular to either version, though. But you’ll need to have Python 3 installed to use it, as most Linux bistros do these days. Another enhancement is that PulseCaster now relies on the excellent pulsectl library for Python, by George Filipkin and Mike Kazantsev. Hats off to them for doing a great job, which allowed me to remove many, many lines of code from this release. Also, due the use of PyGObject3 in this release, there are numerous improvements that make it easier for me to hack on. Silly issues with the GLib mainloop and other entrance/exit stupidity are hopefully a bit better now. Also, the code for dealing with temporary files is now a bit less ugly. I still want to do more work on the overall design and interface, and have ideas. I’ve gotten way better at time management since the last series of releases and hope to do some of this over the USA holiday season this late fall and winter (but no promises).

  • SFXR Qt 1.3.0

    I just released version 1.3.0 of SFXR Qt, my Qt port of the SFXR sound effect generator.