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Geary 0.13.0

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Software
GNOME
  • Geary 0.13.0 released!

    Geary 0.13.0 has been released.

  • GNOME's Geary 0.13 Is A Big Step Forward For This Linux Mail Client

    Geary 0.13 is out today as a big step-up for this GNOME e-mail client for the Linux desktop.

    The Geary 0.13 release features a new UI for creating/managing email accounts, there is finally integration with GNOME Online Accounts, improvements for displaying conversations, better UI/UX work around composing new messages, various bug fixes, security fixes, and other enhancements.

  • Geary 0.13.0 released

    This is a major new release, featuring a number of new features —
    including a new user interface for creating and managing email
    accounts, integration with GNOME Online Accounts (which also provides
    OAuth login support for some services), improvements in displaying
    conversations, composing new messages, interacting with other email
    apps, reporting problems as they occur, and number of important bug
    fixes, server compatibility fixes, and security fixes.

    This latest version is now available for installation from Flathub. See
    the Geary web site for installation details and other installation
    options: https://wiki.gnome.org/Apps/Geary

    Note to maintainers: This version now uses meson for a build system and
    has a number of updated dependencies. Please see meson.build for
    details.

GNOME Desktop: Security Internship, History of GNOME and People Who Work on librsvg

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GNOME
  • GNOME Security Internship - Update 5

    This project started with a simple on/off switch in control center that entirely enabled or disabled the USB protection. A respectively so called always on and always off.

    Later on we introduced a smarter protection level that was active only when the user session was locked.

    While an always on protection seemed a good idea on paper it turned out that the advantages compared to the lock screen protection were very slim.

    When the screen is locked both protections have the same behaviour. They only differentiate when the user session is unlocked.

  • Pick a clock, any clock.

    After listening to the latest episode of Emmanuel’s podcast on the History of GNOME, nostalgia got the better of me, and I decided to dig out the GNOME 1.4 usability study that we ran at Sun Microsystems in March 2001, and make it available online again.

  • Who wrote librsvg?

    The shitty thing about a gradual rewrite is that a few people end up "owning" all the lines of source code. Hopefully this post is a little acknowledgment of the people that made librsvg possible.

    The charts are made with the incredible tool git-of-theseus — thanks to @norwin@mastodon.art for digging it up! Its README also points to a Hercules plotter with awesome graphs. You know, for if you needed something to keep your computer busy during the weekend.

Events: LCA Talks and GNOME Workshop in Faridabad

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OSS
GNOME
  • Saving birds with technology

    Two members of the Cacophony Project came to linux.conf.au 2019 to give an overview of what the project is doing to increase the amount of bird life in New Zealand. The idea is to use computer vision and machine learning to identify and eventually eliminate predators in order to help bird populations; one measure of success will be the volume and variety of bird song throughout the islands. The endemic avian species in New Zealand evolved without the presence of predatory mammals, so many of them have been decimated by the predation of birds and their eggs. The Cacophony Project is looking at ways to reverse that.

  • Mozilla's initiatives for non-creepy deep learning

    Jack Moffitt started off his 2019 linux.conf.au talk by calling attention to Facebook's "Portal" device. It is, he said, a cool product, but raises an important question: why would anybody in their right mind put a surveillance device made by Facebook in their kitchen? There are a lot of devices out there — including the Portal — using deep-learning techniques; they offer useful functionality, but also bring a lot of problems. We as a community need to figure out a way to solve those problems; he was there to highlight a set of Mozilla projects working toward that goal.
    He defined machine learning as the process of making decisions and/or predictions by modeling from input data. Systems using these techniques can perform all kinds of tasks, including language detection and (bad) poetry generation. The classic machine-learning task is spam filtering, based on the idea that certain words tend to appear more often in spam and can be used to detect unwanted email. With more modern neural networks, though, there is no need to do that sort of feature engineering; the net itself can figure out what the interesting features are. It is, he said, "pretty magical".

  • Lisp and the foundations of computing

    At the start of his linux.conf.au 2019 talk, Kristoffer Grönlund said that he would be taking attendees back 60 years or more. That is not quite to the dawn of computing history, but it is close—farther back than most of us were alive to remember. He encountered John McCarthy's famous Lisp paper [PDF] via Papers We Love and it led him to dig deeply into the Lisp world; he brought back a report for the LCA crowd.

    Grönlund noted that this was his third LCA visit over the years. He was pleased that his 2017 LCA talk "Package managers all the way down" was written up in LWN. He also gave his "Everyone gets a pony!" talk at LCA 2018. He works for SUSE, which he thanked for sending him to the conference, but the company is not responsible for anything in the talk, he said with a grin.

  • Shobha Tyagi: Workshop on Road to Become a GNOME/Open Source Contributor

    On Friday 18, January 2019, We organised the workshop on Road to Become a GNOME/ Open Source Contributor at Department of Computer Science and Technology, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Manav Rachna International Institute of Research & Studies, Faridabad.

24 Excellent GNOME Extensions (Updated)

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GNOME

Freedom of choice is a central plank of open source software, and it’s very relevant when choosing and configuring a desktop environment. One of Linux’s best features is its modularity.

Extensibility relates to the ability to customize a desktop environment to an individual’s preferences and tastes. This flexibility is offered by themes, extensions, and applets.

GNOME ships with a System Settings tool which isn’t as diverse as some of its peers. There’s still useful options such as a simple way to enable remote access and file sharing. If you’re serious about customizing GNOME, you’ll need the GNOME Tweaks utility. It’s not an official GNOME app, but it offers some advanced tinkering. But when it comes to micro-configuring the GNOME desktop to your preference, Tweaks still leaves us asking for more. Fortunately, there’s an awesome range of extensions that provide additional functionality.

Here’s our recommended GNOME shell extensions. Most of the extensions are not officially supported by GNOME. But they all take the desktop to the next level, either by adding useful functionality, improving your workflow, or simply offering a touch of panache to the desktop. All the extensions all compatible with the latest release of GNOME. Naturally there’s only open source goodness on offer.

The extensions are best installed from the gnome-shell extensions website. Some extensions are installed by default with Linux distributions.

Read more

Nautilus Exif, PDF And Audio Metadata Tag Columns Extension For Ubuntu

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GNOME
Ubuntu

These metadata tags added by the Nautilus Columns extension are not only useful for a quickly look at some particular audio, pdf or image information from the Nautilus list view, but also to sort some files by a particular metadata tag column to easily identify the files you're looking for.

Nautilus Columns is currently maintained by Spanish blogger Atareao, and it only supports English, Spanish and Galician languages.

Judging from the extension code, it's also supposed to support some video formats as well, but no information was shown for such files on my Ubuntu 18.10 desktop, so it probably needs some fixes in this area. Audio, PDF and Exif metadata was displayed with no issues on my Ubuntu 18.10 desktop.

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GNOME Desktop/GTK: Gnome Shell Extension for Chromecast, GTK Hackfest in Brussels, GTK+ Renamed to GTK and New in GNOME Photos

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GNOME
  • Stream Videos, Music And Pictures From Gnome To Chromecast With Cast To TV Extension (v6 And v7 Released)

    If you own a Chromecast device and you're using Gnome Shell, you should give Cast to TV a try. This Gnome Shell extension adds a new entry in the system menu which allows casting local files to Chromecast or other devices over the local network.

  • Report from the GTK hackfest in Brussels

    Thanks to the GNOME Foundation, various GTK developers were able to meet in Brussels right after FOSDEM, for one of our yearly hackfests.

  • GTK+ No More - It's Just GTK As Developers Prepare For This Year's GTK 4.0

    Beyond the FOSDEM conference itself this past week in Brussels, GNOME developers also used the occasion once again for hosting a developer "hackfest" as they prepare for the home stretch in GTK 4.0 development.

    First up, the developers did decide this week to do away with "GTK+" with the project formally just going by "GTK" now... The "plus" is no more. "The "plus" was added to "GTK" once it was moved out of the GIMP sources tree and the project gained utilities like GLib and the GTK type system, in order to distinguish it from the previous, in-tree version. Very few people are aware of this history, and it's kind of confusing from the perspective of both newcomers and even expert users; people join the wrong IRC channel, the URLs on wikis are fairly ugly, etc."

  • GTK+ renamed to GTK

    The GTK+ toolkit project has, after extensive deliberation, decided to remove the "+" from its name.

  • GNOME Photos: an overview of zooming

    One thing that I really wanted from the beginning was smooth zooming. When the user clicks one of the zoom buttons or presses a keyboard shortcut, the displayed image should smoothly flow in and out instead of jumping to the final zoom level — similar to the way the image smoothly shrinks in to make way for the palette when editing, and expands outwords once done. See this animated mock-up from Jimmac to get an idea.

    For the zooming to be smooth, we need to generate a number of intermediate zoom levels to fill out the frames in the animation. We have to dish out something in the ballpark of sixty different levels every second to be perceived as smooth because that’s the rate at which most displays refresh their screens. This would have been easier with the 5 to 20 megapixel images generated by smart-phones and consumer-grade digital SLRs; but just because we want things to be slick, it doesn’t mean we want to limit ourselves to the ordinary! There is high-end equipment out there producing images in excess of a hundred megapixels and we want to robustly handle those too.

    Downscaling by large factors is tricky. When we are aiming to generate sixty frames per second, there’s less than 16.67 milliseconds for each intermediate zoom level. All we need is a slightly big zoom factor that stresses the CPU and main memory just enough to exceed our budget and break the animation. It’s a lot more likely to happen than a pathological case that crashes the process or brings the system to a halt.

GNOME 3.31.90 Released

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GNOME
  • GNOME 3.31.90 released

    Hi developers and testers,

    GNOME 3.31.90 is now available. This is the first beta release for GNOME 3.32. To ensure the quality of the final release, we have entered feature freeze, UI freeze, and API freeze, so now is a good time for distributors planning to ship GNOME 3.32 to start testing the packages.

    If you want to compile GNOME 3.31.90, you can use the official BuildStream project snapshot. Thanks to BuildStream's build sandbox, it should build reliably for you regardless of your host system:

    https://download.gnome.org/teams/releng/3.31.90/gnome-3.31.90.tar.xz

    The list of updated modules and changes is available here:

    https://download.gnome.org/core/3.31/3.31.90/NEWS

    The source packages are available here:

    https://download.gnome.org/core/3.31/3.31.90/sources/

    WARNING!
    --------
    This release is a snapshot of development code. Although it is buildable and usable, it is primarily intended for testing and hacking purposes. GNOME uses odd minor version numbers to indicate development status.

    For more information about 3.31, the full schedule, the official module lists and the proposed module lists, please see our 3.31 wiki page:

    https://www.gnome.org/start/unstable

    Michael

  • GNOME 3.32 Beta Released With Performance Improvements, Last Minute Features

    GNOME 3.31.90 has been released as what is effectively the GNOME 3.32 beta and also marks the feature/UI/API freezes for this next half-year update to the GNOME desktop.

  • GNOME 3.32 Desktop Environment Enters Beta, Final Release Arrives March 13th

    The GNOME Project announced today the release of the first beta version of the upcoming GNOME 3.32 desktop environment for Linux-based operating systems.

    The GNOME 3.32 Beta release (GNOME 3.31.90) is right on the schedule and it's now available for public testing. It's a major milestone in the development cycle of the GNOME 3.32 desktop environment updating numerous components and apps. A detailed changelog is available here.

    "This is the first beta release for GNOME 3.32. To ensure the quality of the final release, we have entered feature freeze, UI freeze, and API freeze, so now is a good time for distributors planning to ship GNOME 3.32 to start testing the packages," said Michael Catanzaro in an email announcement.

Black is Back: GNOME Shell Ditches Translucent Top Panel

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GNOME

Prepare to bid bye-bye to the fancy translucent top panel in the GNOME Shell desktop environment.

GNOME developers have removed the eye-candy see-through panel effect from the default Shell theme’s code, citing outstanding (and unaddressed) issues with text legibility.

“Nobody stepped up to address those issues in two years, so revert back to the fully opaque top bar”, GNOME dev Florian Müllner explains in a commit.

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GNOME 3.32 Gives Users More Say Over What Apps Can Access

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GNOME

Users can look forward to greater control over installed applications in the upcoming release of GNOME 3.32.

A new ‘Applications‘ panel has been created by developers that offers users more control over the majority of locally installed applications, including Flatpak and repo apps, and on a per-app basis.

Naturally a much wider range of settings are surfaced for installed Flatpak apps. Given that the fledgling format has more fine-tuned permissions model, this isn’t a surprise.

Switches to control access to your local files, system integration, notifications are present, along with a link to control permissions via the Privacy section. There’s also ‘Usage’ section that shows you how much space a given app is taking up.

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GNOME Settings: more GNOME, more settings

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GNOME

Before deep diving into the more extensive architectural changes that I’ve been working on GNOME Shell and Mutter, let’s take a moment to highlight the latest changes to GNOME Settings.

Being the (co)maintainer of Settings for a full year now, the development pace has been great so far. I would go as far as to say that the project is healthy and sustainable now. The shared maintainership model that we adopted allows us to decrease the review time, and yet make sure that every single contribution is reviewed by at least one maintainer.

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More in Tux Machines

Software: 14 Excellent Free Plotting Tools and Texinfo 6.6

  • 14 Excellent Free Plotting Tools
    A plotting tool is computer software which helps to analyze and visualize data, often of a scientific nature. Using this type of software, users can generate plots of functions, data and data fits. Software of this nature typically includes additional functionality, such as data analysis functions including curve fitting. A good plotting tool is very important for generating professional looking graphics for inclusion in academic papers. However, plotting tools are not just useful for academics, engineers, and scientists. Many users will need to plot graphs for other purposes such as presentations. Fortunately, Linux is well endowed with plotting software. There are some heavyweight commercial Linux applications which include plotting functionality. These include MATLAB, Maple, and Mathematica. Without access to their source code, you have limited understanding of how the software functions, and how to change it. The license costs are also very expensive. And we are fervent advocates of open source software. The purpose of this article is to help promote open source plotting tools that are available. To provide an insight into the quality of software that is available, we have compiled a list of 14 excellent plotting tools. Many of the applications are very mature. For example, gnuplot has been in development since the mid-1980s. The choice of plotting software may depend on which programming language you prefer. For example, if your leaning towards Python, matplotlib is an ideal candidate as it’s written in, and designed specifically for Python. Whereas, if you’re keen on the R programming language, you’ll probably prefer ggplot2, which is one of the most popular R packages. With good reason, it offers a powerful model of graphics that removes a lot of the difficulty in making complex multi-players graphics. R does come with “base graphics” which are the traditional plotting functions distributed with R. But gpplot2 takes graphics to the next level.
  •  
  • [GNU] Texinfo 6.6 released
    We have released version 6.6 of Texinfo, the GNU documentation format.

Bare-Metal Kubernetes Servers and SUSE Servers

  • The Rise of Bare-Metal Kubernetes Servers
    While most instances of Kubernetes today are deployed on virtual machines running in the cloud or on-premises, there is a growing number of instances of Kubernetes being deployed on bare-metal servers. The two primary reasons for opting to deploy Kubernetes on a bare- metal server over a virtual machine usually are performance and reliance on hardware accelerators. In the first instance, an application deployed at the network edge might be too latency-sensitive to tolerate the overhead created by a virtual machine. AT&T, for example, is working with Mirantis to deploy Kubernetes on bare-metal servers to drive 5G wireless networking services.
  • If companies can run SAP on Linux, they can run any application on it: Ronald de Jong
    "We have had multiple situations with respect to security breaches in the last couple of years, albeit all the open source companies worked together to address the instances. As the source code is freely available even if something goes wrong, SUSE work closely with open source software vendors to mitigate the risk", Ronald de Jong, President of -Sales, SUSE said in an interview with ET CIO.
  • SUSE Public Cloud Image Life-cycle
    It has been a while since we published the original image life-cycle guidelines SUSE Image Life Cycle for Public Cloud Deployments. Much has been learned since, technology has progressed, and the life-cycle of products has changed. Therefore, it is time to refresh things, update our guidance, and clarify items that have led to questions over the years. This new document serves as the guideline going forward starting February 15th, 2019 and supersedes the original guideline. Any images with a date stamp later than v20190215 fall under the new guideline. The same basic principal as in the original guideline applies, the image life-cycle is aligned with the product life-cycle of the product in the image. Meaning a SLES image generally aligns with the SUSE Linux Enterprise Server life-cycle and a SUSE Manager image generally aligns with the SUSE Manager life-cycle.

Steam's Slipping Grip and Release of Wine-Staging 4.2

  • Steam's iron grip on PC gaming is probably over even if the Epic Games Store fails
     

    It doesn’t matter though. Whether Epic succeeds or not, Steam has already lost. The days of Valve’s de facto monopoly are over, and all that matters is what comes next.

  • Wine-Staging 4.2 Released - Now Less Than 800 Patches Atop Upstream Wine
    Wine 4.2 debuted on Friday and now the latest Wine-Staging release is available that continues carrying hundreds of extra patches re-based atop upstream Wine to provide various experimental/testing fixes and other feature additions not yet ready for mainline Wine.  Wine-Staging for a while has been carrying above 800 patches and at times even above 900, but with Wine-Staging 4.2 they have now managed to strike below the 800 patch level. It's not that they are dropping patches, but a lot of the Wine-Staging work has now been deemed ready for mainline and thus merged to the upstream code-base. A number of patches around the Windows Codecs, NTDLL, BCrypt, WineD3D, and other patches have been mainlined thus now coming in at a 798 patch delta.

OSS Leftovers

  • Tomorrow is Good: #Freethemodels: we need open source energy models
    The transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy is arguably the biggest operation in human history. But it’s increasingly based on secret models with a bad track record. That has to change! For me, this journey started in 2007 (Dutch link). I was doing some research in my spare time and it struck me that solar, wind and electric vehicles were on course to become cheaper than fossil alternatives. What struck me even more, was that the predictions of ‘authoritative’ institutions like the International Energy Agency and the Energy Information Administration seemed to ignore this development. At first, it seemed unrelated to my work in computers, the Internet and mobile phones. Then I realized the similarity: I had been ‘fighting’ with ‘trusted experts’ in Telecom for the past 15 years. They had been denying the future of PCs, the Internet and mobile phones all through my career. The lesson I take from this: experts of the old cannot fathom the new.
  • Google open-sources PlaNet, an AI agent that learns about the world from images
    Reinforcement learning — a machine learning training technique that uses rewards to drive AI agents toward certain goals — is a reliable means of improving said agents’ decision-making, given plenty of compute, data, and time. But it’s not always practical; model-free approaches, which aim to get agents to directly predict actions from observations about their world, can take weeks of training. Model-based reinforcement learning is a viable alternative — it has agents come up with a general model of their environment they can use to plan ahead. But in order to accurately forecast actions in unfamiliar surroundings, those agents have to formulate rules from experience. Toward that end, Google in collaboration with DeepMind today introduced the Deep Planning Network (PlaNet) agent, which learns a world model from image inputs and leverages it for planning. It’s able to solve a variety of image-based tasks with up to 5,000 percent the data efficiency, Google says, while maintaining competitiveness with advanced model-free agents.
  • eLife invests in Texture to provide open-source content production tools for publishers
    Originally created by Substance Software GmbH (Substance) as a JavaScript library of tools for web-based content editing, Texture has been supported by a community of organisations collectively known as the Substance Consortium and including Érudit, the Public Knowledge Project (PKP) and SciELO. eLife has now invested in Texture's development to support its own open-source publishing platform, but - as with the organisation's other open-source projects - any new features will be added to the tool in such a way that they can be repurposed by other publishers.
  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Principled GraphQL
    GraphQL is quickly becoming the preferred approach for working with APIs. It is a query language for APIs, and is designed to give users more insight and understanding into the data inside their APIs. According to GraphQL platform provider Apollo, it’s also so much more than a query language. “It’s a comprehensive solution to the problem of connecting modern apps to services in the cloud. As such, it forms the basis for a new and important layer in the modern application development stack: the data graph. This new layer brings all of a company’s app data and services together in one place, with one consistent, secure, and easy-to-use interface, so that anyone can draw upon it with minimal friction,” the company wrote.
  • Open source your automation testing for the mobile web with OpenTest
    Testing is a crucial part of the development cycle. How else will we find out if that cool new idea actually works in practice? Entering a crowded field, OpenTest offers developers a new tool for standardizing functional tests across a wide variety of platforms and teams. OpenTest is an open source functional test automation tool for web applications, mobile apps and APIs. With a wide variety of features and a focus on mainstream testing practices, OpenTest gives developers a spectacular foundation to evaluate their applications for the mobile web. What’s more, it is an easy to use tool for beginners as well as experts.
  • Facebook Open-Sources PyText NLP Modeling Framework
    Facebook AI Research is open-sourcing PyText, a natural-language-processing (NLP) modeling framework that is used in the Portal video-calling device and M Suggestions in Facebook Messenger. NLP is a technology for parsing and handling human languages and is a key component of chatbot or smart-assistant applications. Engineers developing NLP algorithms often turn to deep-learning systems to build their solutions, such as Facebook's PyTorch platform. PyText builds on top of PyTorch by providing a set of interfaces and models specifically tuned for NLP. Internally, Facebook is using PyText to power NLP in their Portal video-calling device and in their Messenger app's M Suggestion feature.
  • Fasttoken Is Making Its Codes Open Source
    One of the most common problems facing the Ethereum blockchain is scaling. While Ethereum has seen its fair share of proposed scaling solutions, state channels appear to be the best solution so far. State channels are a form of block communication that occurs outside of the blockchain and can be used to support greater scalability. And that’s not in the distant future – state channels are already available.
  • Novel Software May Help Detect Heart Diseases: Study
    Researchers have developed a new software that could spot potentially lethal heart diseases and may lead to improvements in prevention and treatment, says a new study. The software - ElectroMap - which measures electrical activity in the organ, is a new open-source software for processing, analysis and mapping complex cardiac data.
  • This new software reads cardiac data, can predict risk of heart disease
    The ElectroMap software is an open-source software for processing, analysis and mapping complex cardiac data, said experts at the University of Birmingham Dubai.  The heart's pumping ability is controlled by electrical activity that triggers the heart muscle cells to contract and relax.  In certain heart diseases such as arrhythmia, the organ's electrical activity is affected.  Cardiac researchers can already record and analyse the heart's electrical behaviour using optical and electrode mapping, but widespread use of these technologies is limited by a lack of appropriate software, according to the study published in the journal Scientific Reports.
  • Gadgetbridge is an open-source replacement for the Android app of Pebble, Mi Band, Amazfit, and other smart bands
    Purchasing a Smart Band or a smart wrist-based fitness tracker means that you not only purchase a product, but you also purchase yourself into an ecosystem of services controlled by the manufacturer. The functionality that is present on your smart band flows to you through the manufacturer, meaning that your data always goes through one extra pair of hands than is required. For most smart bands, you have to create an account with the manufacturer and continue tracking your activity and data through the manufacturer’s app — something that may not appeal to everyone in this privacy-conscious world. Enter Gadgetbridge, an open-source app that focuses on removing the manufacturer out of the equation.
  • The Pros and Cons of Open Source Cloud Computing
    Open source software is becoming increasingly more common in the technology world. True to its name, the underlying base of open source software is available for its users to study and tinker with. As such, dedicated userbases for open source technology have propped up to provide resources, updates, and technical help for open source programs.
  • You Can Now Use Open-Source Machine Learning Tools In Your Ableton Sessions
    Despite having become buzzwords in music technology over the last few years, it has often felt like “artificial intelligence” and “machine learning” were experiments taking place in secluded computer labs or only with established musicians. The tools that promised to revolutionize the way we make music never seemed to trickle down to the “we” of your regular bedroom producer. Magenta Studio might be set to change all that. Developed by the Google AI team and first showed at Ableton Loop in Los Angeles last year, Magenta is now available standalone and on Ableton (both Mac and Windows), giving you the chance to experiment with the powerful data analysis that machine learning provides.
  • 5 Open-source ML Tools You Can Use Without Coding
    As the demand for machine learning and artificial intelligence goes up, leading tech giants realised the need to give developers access to tools to build and deploy models. From the industrial perspective, there aren’t enough skilled programmers and data scientists within the industry to develop these systems. Tech giants are now open sourcing their platforms and developer tools to lower the barrier for entry in AI/ML. In this article, we list down 5 such tools that are making ML and AI accessible: Lobe:Lobe is an easy-to-use visual mechanism that lets users to build custom deep learning models, promptly train them, and ship them immediately in a user desired app without writing any code. Users can begin by dragging in a folder of training examples from there desktop. Lobe automatically builds its users a custom deep learning model and starts training. User can export the trained model and ship it directly in their app.
  • Healthcare Design Studio Publishes Open Source Health Finance Visualization
    “The Healthscape visualization serves two purposes. The first is to provide the public and professionals interested in the healthcare space a way to increase understanding and explore how all the pieces fit together. The second is to give providers, patient advocacy groups, health policymakers, and health economists a visual communication tool to discuss issues at the higher health systems level,” said Juhan Sonin, director of GoInvo.
  • HUAWEI's open source WATCH GT smartwatch is coming to America
    The company is hoping American consumers will also be interested in its wearables, as today, it reveals the previously announced HUAWEI WATCH GT is finally coming to America. While not the company's first smartwatch to hit the USA, it is definitely the most intriguing. It runs an open source operating system called LiteOS, and battery life can apparently reach two weeks. No, that is not a typo -- two weeks! It focuses heavily on health -- it can monitor fitness and sleep. Best of all, it is compatible with both iOS and Android, so it won't lock you into either platform.
  • Argonne’s Innovative Community Software Is on Weather Scientists’ Radar
    In 2015, the Python-ARM Radar Toolkit (Py-ART) made its open-source debut. After 4 years, and with contributions from 34 individual editors, it is now a staple in radar science. The toolkit helps scientists analyze radar data to improve models of the Earth’s systems; its growth illustrates the power of community software. Py-ART is an architecture for working with radar data in the Python programming language. It ingests data from a wide variety of atmospheric radars to produce visualizations that enable users to draw meaningful conclusions. Institutions across the world — including the National Weather Service, MeteoSwiss, IBM and the University of Illinois — use Py-ART to organize and analyze radar data. [...] Inspired by Py-ART’s success, scientists have launched the OpenRadar Partnership, an informal collaboration across Europe, Canada and the United States on open-source radar software education and inter-compatibility.
  • Furnace turns up heat on data streaming apps
  • Furnace – New, Serverless, Open Source Platform -- Lets Developers Create Advanced, Data-Intensive Apps In Hours, Not Months
  • Why Use Open Source to Gain More Visibility into Network Monitoring
  • 8 Free & Best Open source bare metal hypervisors (Foss)
  • Open Robotics turns its focus to ROS 2.0
    Open Robotics, previously known as the Open Source Robotics Foundation, is pouring its development efforts into rewriting the core of the Robot Operating System (ROS) 1.0 this year. ROS has been around since 2007, and while version 1.0 is already being used in a number of different applications and solutions, the robotics industry is changing and Open Robotics is determined to see that the technology changes with it. Despite its name, ROS is not exactly an operating system. It is a collection of software libraries and tools used to develop robot applications. According to Brian Gerkey, CEO of Open Robotics, when the organization first started working on ROS, many of the robotics solutions already available were in the form of traditional robot arms used in factories or in such things as floor-cleaning robots for consumers. “Since that time we’ve seen an explosion of products in other domains, especially mobile robots that do everything from transport goods, to provide facility security, to entertain. And of course we’ve seen the impossible to ignore trend of investment and advancement in autonomous vehicles,” he said. The ongoing evolution of the robotics industry, and the need for more advanced solutions, is what led Open Robotics to rethink the core system.
  • MITRE Announces Compass™, a New Open-Source Application to Collect Common Oncology Data
  • New geometric model improves predictions of fluid flow in rock
    "Relationships once thought to be inherently history-dependent can now be reconsidered based on rigorous geometric theory," McClure said. The team used the open source Lattice Boltzmann for Porous Media (LBPM) code, developed by McClure and named for the statistics-driven lattice Boltzmann method that calculates fluid flow across a range of scales more rapidly than calculations using finite methods, which are most accurate at small scales. The LBPM code, which uses Titan's GPUs to speed fluid flow simulations, is released through the Open Porous Media Initiative, which maintains open-source codes for the research community.
  • Over 16,000 bugs later, Google’s fuzz tester is now open source
    Here comes another tool open sourced by Google! This time, security and testing take the center stage. ClusterFuzz helps find bugs in your software so you can exterminate them with its scalable fuzzing infrastructure. Open sourced on February 7, 2019, this service focuses on stability and security. ClusterFuzz already has some impressive numbers to brag about. So far, it found over 16,000 bugs in Chrome, as well as over 11,000 bugs in open source projects integrated with OSS-Fuzz. If you use Chrome as your browser of choice, then you owe some of your experience to ClusterFuzz. Now you too can harness that power for good and keep your own projects secure and bug-free. As always, it is a great plus to all developers when a useful tool gets open sourced. Contributing to open source is becoming the new normal, with even large organizations getting on board. Hopefully FOSS will continue to grow and help break down silos.
  • Continuous Fuzzing for all? Google open sources ClusterFuzz bug hunter
    Google has open sourced ClusterFuzz, a scalable fuzzing infrastructure project that has already helped to get rid of more than 16,000 Chrome bugs. It is also the tool used for Google’s Oss-Fuzz initiative, which aims at helping maintainers of open source projects get their project as ready to deal with anything users throw at it as possible – an offer over 160 projects have accepted in the last two years. Fuzzing is a sort of testing approach which confronts a system with random inputs to help developers to find security flaws and unexpected behaviour.  ClusterFuzz has been written to offer fuzzing at scale and in a continuous manner, which is why Google claims to have it running on over 25,000 cores for Chrome. There it is integrated into the development workflow and provides users with a web interface for managing and viewing crashes caused during testing. To ensure no issue goes unnoticed, it also includes automatic bug filing and closing for the Monorail issue tracker.
  • Rubrik Launches Open Source Community Called Build
    Rubrik announced an open source community, Rubrik Build, which aims to simplify improvement of existing projects and ease creation of applications, automation tooling, and integrations. It’s based on a set of APIs providing pre-built use cases, quick-start guides, and integrations with popular tooling. A goal is inclusion. “Many people in the tech community do not come from a traditional software engineering background, and this can make contributing to open source seem daunting,” Rubrik Principal Technologist Rebecca Fitzhugh told SDxCentral. “The goal of Rubrik Build is to break down these barriers so anyone can contribute to a project.”
  • Rubrik just launched an open source community
    Rubrik just announced Rubrik Build, a new 100 percent public, 100 percent Open Source community built around use cases and integrations that consume Rubrik APIs. As part of Rubrik Build, contributors can leverage existing software development kits, tools, and use cases or contribute their own ideas, code, documentation, and feedback. The goal of Rubrik Build to establish a community around consuming Rubrik's world-class APIs to quickly get started with pre-built use cases, quick start guides, and integrations with popular tooling. The Build program was designed with customers in mind, easing their transition to consuming APIs.
  • A former Marine explains how her service helped prepare her to lead a new open source initiative for $3.3 billion startup Rubrik
     

    The idea, says Fitzhugh, is to encourage an open source ecosystem to flourish around Rubrik, though the company's main offering is not offered as open source.  

  • The Internet Was Built on the Free Labor of Open Source Developers. Is That Sustainable?
     

    In a recent interview with New Left Review, Stallman described how MIT’s AI lab fostered a culture of collaboration and radical openness to the point where the lab’s giant computer wasn’t protected with passwords and the doors to the lab were always unlocked. To be sure, Stallman acknowledged that some of this culture of openness was a product of circumstance: Minsky, for instance, was always losing his door keys and the researchers in the lab couldn’t help but share the room-sized computer because it was the only one. Nevertheless, the spirit of the lab made an impression on Stallman.  

    In 1983, he posted a message to a Usenet group—basically a proto-forum—in which he declared his intention to create an operating system and “give it away free to everyone who can use it.” Stallman called the operating system GNU, a recursive acronym for “Gnus Not Unix,” a challenge to the dominant proprietary OS of the time—Unix, which was used internally at Bell Labs—embedded in its very name.  

    GNU was the opening salvo in the free software movement, whose principles Stallman summarized in the 1985 GNU Manifesto: “I consider that the Golden Rule requires that if I like a program I must share it with other people who like it. Software sellers want to divide the users and conquer them, making each user agree not to share with others. I refuse to break solidarity with other users in this way.”  

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  • Open-Source Biology and Biohacking Hack Chat
    Justin Atkin‘s name might not ring a bell, but you’ve probably seen his popular YouTube channel The Thought Emporium, devoted to regular doses of open source science. Justin’s interests span a wide range, literally from the heavens above to the microscopic world. His current interest is to genetically modify yeast to produce spider silk, and to perhaps even use the yeast for brewing beer. He and the Thought Emporium team have been busy building out a complete DIY biology lab to support the effort, and have been conducting a variety of test experiments along the way.