Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

GNOME

Ubuntu GNOME 16.04.1 LTS Released but Still Doesn't Uses the GNOME 3.20 Stack

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

As we reported last week, Canonical published the first point release of its long-term supported Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system, offering users new installation mediums with all the updates made available since April 21, 2016.

Read more

GNOME Software 3.22 Will Support Installation of Snaps, Flatpak Repository Files

Filed under
GNOME

The GNOME 3.21.4 desktop environment was released last week, which means that many of the default applications and components were updated with bug fixes and various enhancements.

Read more

GNOME 3.21.4

Filed under
GNOME
  • GNOME 3.21.4 released
  • GNOME 3.21.4 Released

    GNOME 3.21.4 was announced today as the latest development release of this desktop environment leading up to September's release of GNOME 3.22.

    Core changes in GNOME 3.21.4 include an improved annotation properties dialog UI in Evince, a structured logging API for GLib, support for joysticks with GNOME Bluetooth, support for alarms in GNOME Calendar, support for Snaps in GNOME Software, support for authenticating in plugins with GNOME Software, and various GTK+ toolkit improvements. There are also the previously talked about Mutter improvements with a new screen capture API, support for NVIDIA's vRAM robustness extension, and significant frame-buffer/display changes for working on multi-DPI desktop support.

  • The state of gamepad support in Games

    Gamepad support has now been merged into GNOME Games v3.21.4 !!! This means that you can play your favorite retro games using a gamepad!!!Gamepad support has now been merged into GNOME Games v3.21.4 !!! This means that you can play your favorite retro games using a gamepad!!!

GNOME News

Filed under
GNOME
  • Writing an ebook about usability?

    I write more about this on my Coaching Buttons blog, that I'm thinking about writing an ebook. Actually, it's several ebooks. But the one that applies here is Open Source Usability.

  • GNOME Mutter 3.21.4 Released WIth New Screen Capture API, NVIDIA vRAM Robustness

    Various GNOME software components were checked in today in preparation for this week's GNOME 3.21.4 development release.

    When it comes to the Mutter 3.21.4 compositor / window manager release, there are a few new features on top of fixes. This 3.21.4 release includes the frame-buffer / display work I talked about this morning that should allow multiple monitor setups to have different DPIs, among other design improvements. There is also improved X11 to/from Wayland copy/paste interaction, support for the NV_robustness_video_memory_purge extension, a screen capture API has been added to Mutter itself, and various other fixes/improvements.

  • Mutter 3.21.4

GNOME News

Filed under
GNOME
  • Responding with emoji

    In Diana's usability test, she will moderate a "first experience" of GNOME. Testers will login to GNOME using a fresh "test" login, and go through the first-time experience. The testers will use a few scenario tasks to guide them through tasks that most users would usually do on a new computer (check email, copy files from a USB stick). Afterwards, Diana will interview each tester to see what they thought.

  • BOF session of Nautilus – GUADEC
  • GNOME's Mutter Sees Big Rework, Striving For Multi-DPI Rendering

    A ton of patches hit GNOME's Mutter this morning by Jonas Ådahl as he's been working towards multi DPI rendering and other improvements by drawing monitor contents to individual frame-buffers.

    Jonas has been reworking Mutter to draw monitor contents to individual frame-buffers rather than targeting a single frame-buffer, in order to support situations of having multiple monitors with a desire to have independent DPI changes for each display (e.g. one HiDPI display and other displays that are not), etc. Jonas summarized it with this bug report.

GNOME News

Filed under
GNOME
  • Cosimo in BJGUG

    Last Month Cosimo came Beijing, and we had a meet up with Beijing GNOME User Group and Beijing Linux User Group in SUSE Office, Cosimo introduced ‘Looking ahead to GNOME 3.22 and beyond’, the flatpak bring lots of attention. Here I just shared some photos. Thanks for Cosimo’s coming!

  • GUADEC Flatpak contest
  • Automatic decompression of archives

    With extraction support in Nautilus, the next feature that I’ve implemented as part of my project is automatic decompression. While the name is a bit fancy, this feature is just about extracting archives instead of opening them in an archive manager. From the UI perspective, this only means a little change in the context menu:

  • Nautilus Is Adding Native Archive Extraction

    Nautilus, the GNOME file manager, is to improve support for extracting zips, tars and other compressed archives.

Nautilus Development

Filed under
Development
GNOME
  • GSoC 2016: The adventure begins

    Hello! I am Razvan, a technology & open-source enthusiast and I am working on what is probably the most interesting project for me so far, Nautilus. So far, this has been the highlight of my experience – lots of interesting things learned while coding and a great interaction with the community. This is mainly thanks to Carlos, captain of Nautilus, who always finds the time to help me and other contributors whenever we get stuck. On top of this, the funny chats with him and people from the GNOME community make contributing so much more enjoyable! Up until now I’ve been titled King of the Trash™, I’ve learned about some file system magic from Christian Hergert, and I’ve also been threatened by a katana-wielding GNOME samurai. Awesome, right?

  • Extraction support in Nautilus

    As a result, the output will always have the name of the source archive, making it easy to find after an extraction. Also, the maximum number of conflicts an extraction can have is just one, the output itself. Hurray, no more need to go through a thousand dialogs!

  • Improved File Extraction Coming To GNOME's Nautilus

    As part of Google Summer of Code, improved extraction support for compressed files is being worked on for the Nautilus file manager.

GNOME News

Filed under
GNOME

GNOME News

Filed under
GNOME
  • Final preparations for usability tests

    I wanted to take a moment to reflect on the schedule. A few weeks ago, I commented on moving to the project phase of usability testing.​ I included a calendar of our remaining work. If you refer back to the calendar, you will note we are nearing the end of week 8. Next week is week 9 (starting 18 July) so Diana, Renata and Ciarrai have another week to refine their usability tests.

  • Using Gedit, Nautilus with Pkexec Will Soon Be Less Hassle

    Here’s the deal: ‘gksu’ (the once recommended way to run GUI apps as root) was deprecated in favour of ‘pkexec’, a graphical fronted for PolicyKit, several years back. Ubuntu no longer ships with gksu installed.

    For all its benefits there’s a big ol’ “problem” with pkexec: it’s a total butt-ache to use to run certain GUI apps as root. In fact, to use pkexec with applications like Gedit or Nautilus you need to have a requisite PolicyKit file installed in your “/usr/share/polkit-1/actions” directory for each app you’re trying to run as root.

  • GNOME Maps Hits A Dead End, Can No Longer Display Maps

    If you were set to plan your weekend activities using the GNOME Maps application, you’ll need to change course.

    As of this week the nifty desktop navigation app can no longer fetch maps tiles to display.

    MapQuest, the application’s tile provider, has amended its usage policy and discontinued direct tile access. GNOME developers have the choice of paying to keep using the service or, ultimately, using a new one.

    And that won’t be easy.

    “I will need some help with contacting OpenStreetMap [and] with finding solution to our tile issue. I think we are going to need our own tiles.gnome.org for a map application/platform to be feasible,” says Jonas Danielsson, Maps’ chief developer.

GNOME News

Filed under
GNOME
  • GNOME Keysign new GUI and updates
  • GSoC Updates: ownCloud music Ampache API

    Continuing from the grilo owncloud plugin last month, I’ve been working towards integrating the source with GNOME Music. In order to minimize the network requests, we’ve decided to cache the results in a local database. This would also improve user experience since cached results would populate relatively faster in the UI. Victor Toso suggested I look into GOM for implementing the cache and querying the data. My initial thought was to use raw SQL queries to query an sqlite database but this abstraction would help indeed.

  • Future of relative window positioning

    With emerging display server technologies, toolkits sometimes need to adapt how they implement the features they provide. One set of features that needs adaptation is how GTK+ positions popup windows such as menus, popovers and tooltips, so that they will be placed within the work area of the monitor.

    In the old days, when GTK+ wanted to position a menu, it would first look up the global position of the parent window of the menu. It would then look up the work areas of all the monitors connected. With the given work areas, the global position of the parent window, and the intended menu position relative to the parent window it wanted to place the menu, GTK+ would use a clever algorithm calculating a reasonable position for the menu to be placed so that it would be visible to the user. For example, if the File menu doesn’t have enough space to popup below the parent menu item, then GTK+ would re-position it above the parent menu item instead.

  • Window/Menu Positioning Improvements For GTK+ On Wayland/Mir

    Red Hat's Jonas Ådahl has shared work being done to the GTK+ toolkit for avoiding global window positions for tooltips/menus/popovers and instead refactor it down to GDK and allow relative positioning.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Linux Filesystems Explained — EXT2/3/4, XFS, Btrfs, ZFS

The first time I installed Ubuntu on my computer, when I was sixteen, I was astonished by the number of filesystems that were available for the system installation. There were so many that I was left overwhelmed and confused. I was worried that if I picked the wrong one my system might run too slow or that it might be more problematic than another. I wanted to know which was the best. Since then, things have changed quite a bit. Many Linux distributions offer a ‘standard’ filesystem that an installation will default to unless otherwise specified. I think this was a very good move because it assists newcomers in making a decision and being comfortable with it. But, for those that are still unsure of some of the contemporary offerings, we’ll be going through them today. Read more

Today in Techrights

KDE Plasma 5.7.2 Introduces Lots of Plasma Workspace Improvements, KWin Fixes

KDE released the second maintenance update for the KDE Plasma 5.7 desktop environment series, which has already been adopted by several popular GNU/Linux operating systems. Read more

Gain access to an ARM server running Linux OS, through the cloud

The Linaro Developer Cloud has gone live, and users can apply to test an ARM-based server with Linux Read more