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GNOME 41 Desktop Environment Slated for Release on September 22nd, 2021

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GNOME

While some of you out there are still waiting for the GNOME 40 desktop environment to arrive in the stable software repositories of your favorite GNU/Linux distribution, the GNOME Project is already working on the next major version, GNOME 41.

Development on the GNOME 41 release will kick out soon and it will stick to the same routine as in the GNOME 40 development cycle, meaning that public testers will be able to test drive only an Alpha, a Beta, and a Release Candidate.

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Myxer – A Modern GTK Volume Mixer for PulseAudio

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GNOME

Myxer is a modern new volume mixer application for the PulseAudio sound server. It’s a lightweight and powerful replacement for your system Volume Mixer written in Rust with GTK toolkit.

Myxer can manage audio devices, streams, and even card profiles. And it offers option to show individual audio channels.

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10 Awesome gedit Text Editor Features to Make You More Productive

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Linux
GNOME

Here's a list of the top 10 cool gedit features which you probably not aware of, until now. Take a look.
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New GNOME Designs Explore a ‘Bottom Bar’ Layout for GNOME Shell

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GNOME

For the past 10 years GNOME shell has been based around a single panel stripped across the top of user’s screens — but is this fundamental feature about to change?

Well, to quell whatever dim intrigue I just stirred: no, it’s not. However, GNOME designer Tobias Bernard, a key architect of the well-received GNOME 40 release, is playing around with a concept in which —get this— GNOME’s famous top bar is moved to the bottom of the screen.

Kind of crazy, huh? It’d be the most major ‘major’ design change made to GNOME Shell since it debuted. After all, the top bar is an anchor in the GNOME Shell experience. It’s where the status menu, notification center, clock/calendar applet, app menu, and oh-so-important Activities button all sit.

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For the past 10 years GNOME shell has been based around a single panel stripped across the top of user’s screens — but is this fundamental feature about to change?

Well, to quell whatever dim intrigue I just stirred: no, it’s not. However, GNOME designer Tobias Bernard, a key architect of the well-received GNOME 40 release, is playing around with a concept in which —get this— GNOME’s famous top bar is moved to the bottom of the screen.

Kind of crazy, huh? It’d be the most major ‘major’ design change made to GNOME Shell since it debuted. After all, the top bar is an anchor in the GNOME Shell experience. It’s where the status menu, notification center, clock/calendar applet, app menu, and oh-so-important Activities button all sit.

Read more

Floating Dock Is the Perfect Dock for the GNOME 40 Desktop

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GNOME

Floating Dock is not a new extension for the GNOME desktop, but it was recently updated by its creator to work on the latest GNOME 40 desktop environment, allowing you to have an always visible (or hidden) dock on your screen for launching apps.

As you may be aware, the GNOME 40 desktop environment comes with a major redesign of the Activities Overview that also moves the dock from left side of the screen to the bottom. For me, that makes navigating much easier, but I have to admit that I miss having an always-on dock.

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Tobias Bernard: Permanent Revolution

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GNOME

10 years ago today was April 6, 2011.

Windows XP was still everywhere. Smartphones were tiny, and not everyone had one yet. New operating systems were coming out left and right. Android phones had physical buttons, and webOS seemed to have a bright future. There was general agreement that the internet would bring about a better world, if only we could give everyone unrestricted access to it.

This was the world into which GNOME 3.0 was released.

I can’t speak to what it was like inside the project back then, this is all way before my time. I was still in high school, and though I wasn’t personally contributing to any free software projects yet, I remember it being a very exciting moment.

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Also: GNOME Internet Radio Locator 4.0.1 with KVRX on Fedora Core 33

“Getting Things GNOME” 0.5 released!

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GNOME

This release of GTG has been 9 months in the making after the groundbreaking 0.4 release. While 0.4 was a major “perfect storm” overhaul, 0.5 is also a very technology-intensive release, even though it was done in a relatively short timeframe comparatively.

Getting Things GNOME 0.5 brings a truckload of user experience refinements, bugfixes, a completely revamped file format and task editor, and a couple of notable performance improvements. It doesn’t solve every performance problem yet (some remain), but it certainly improves a bunch of them for workaholics like me. If 0.4 felt a bit like a turtle, 0.5 is a definitely a much faster turtle.

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Getting Things GNOME 0.5 To-Do App Released with Recurring Tasks, Performance Improvements

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GNOME

It's been about nine months since Getting Things GNOME 0.4 was released as a massive update after more than six years of development, and now your favorite personal tasks and to-do app gets another major release, Getting Things GNOME 0.5, bringing user experience refinements, revamped file format and task editor, performance improvements, and killer new features.

The biggest new feature in the Getting Things GNOME 0.5 release is the ability to create recurring (repeating) tasks. This is indeed a must-have feature for any personal tasks, calendar, or to-do app, and I personally can't imagine leaving without it. For those who don't know what recurring tasks are, the feature lets you set automatic reminders (recurrence) for a certain task every day, every other day, as well as weekly, monthly, and yearly.

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6 Reasons Why You Should Upgrade Your Linux Desktop to GNOME 40 Today

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GNOME

GNOME just unveiled its latest release, the GNOME 40 on March 24, 2021. As revolutionary as the jump from V3.38 to V40 has been, the improvements brought together by over 24,000 commits by roughly 822 contributors all across the globe are nothing less than spectacular.

From visual overhauls to performance enhancements, it is one of the biggest updates that GNOME has received since GNOME 3. Let's take a look at a few of the best features and changes that this release brings to the table.

[...]

This new change is more user intuitive as GNOME smartly creates or removes workspaces automatically as per the number of applications open. Additionally, you can also drag and drop your applications across the workspaces and GNOME will smartly rearrange them in a cognizant fashion.

The dock also underwent some minor changes compared to its former version, now allowing the users to have separators to separate user favorite applications and running, but non-favorite applications.

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How to Install GNOME 40 in Ubuntu 21.04 [Testing Only]

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GNOME
Ubuntu

A good samaritan created a PPA which you can add and install GNOME 40 in Ubuntu 21.04 (Hirsute Hippo). And this is only for testing the packages.
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Is Linux A More Secure Option Than Windows For Businesses?

There are many factors to consider when choosing an OS, security being among one of the most critical. The general consensus among experts is that Linux is the most secure OS by design - an impressive feat that can be attributed to a variety of characteristics including its transparent open-source code, strict user privilege model, diversity, built-in kernel security defenses and the security of the applications that run on it. The high level of security, customization, compatibility and cost-efficiency that Linux offers make it a popular choice among businesses and organizations looking to secure high-value data. Linux has already been adopted by governments and tech giants around the world including IBM, Google and Amazon, and currently powers 97% of the top one million domains in the world. All of today’s most popular programming languages were first developed on Linux and can now run on any OS. In this sense, we’re all using Linux - whether we know it or not! This article will examine why Linux is arguably the best choice for businesses looking for a flexible, cost-efficient, exceptionally secure OS. To help you weigh your options, we’ll explore how Linux compares to Windows in the level of privacy and protection against vulnerabilities and attacks it is able to offer all businesses and organizations. Read more