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GNOME

Marcus Lundblad: Maps in GNOME 3.38

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GNOME

It's been a while since the last blog post and it's been a while since 3.38.0 was released, and in fact there was already the stable on-schedule 3.38.1 release. On top of that a sneaky asynchronous programming bug showed up that in some circumstances such as high-latency connections, or fast typing can give out-of-sync search results I cut an extra 3.38.1.1 patch release.

But now to the summary of the 3.38 user-facing changes. I think all of this has been covered in previous posts, but I guess it's always nice with a bit of a summary.

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CoyIM – A GTK+ Chat Client Focus on Safety and Security

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Development
GNOME
HowTos

Looking for an XMPP Jabber client for Linux? CoyIM is a free open-source GTK+ client that focus on safety and security.

CoyIM is written in Go programming language with GTK+ framework. It works on Linux, Windows, and Mac OS. The chat client has built-in support for Tor, OTR and TLS.

The Tor support allows users to become anonymous while chatting, OTR makes end-to-end encryption of communication possible, and TLS adds another layer of encryption for the communication with chat servers.

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Best GTK3 Themes for Linux

Filed under
Linux
GNOME

This article will cover some of the most popular GTK3 themes available for Linux. If you don’t like the default look and feel of your GNOME based Linux distribution, you can use these themes to give a new flavor to your desktop.

To change GTK3 themes in your system, you may need to install the “GNOME Tweaks” app from the package manager of your Linux distribution. Maintaining and continuously updating GTK3 themes can be a difficult task for developers, as the GNOME API is ever changing. The new GNOME Shell desktop environment doesn’t encourage third party themes. However, third party themes are still being developed, though their numbers have certainly declined over the years.

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GNOME 3.36.7 Desktop Update Released with Various Bug Fixes

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GNOME

GNOME 3.36.7 continues the monthly release cycle and comes four weeks after GNOME 3.36.6 to further improve the overall stability and reliability of the GNOME 3.36 desktop environment series, which many of you are probably still using right now since GNOME 3.38 hasn’t yet arrived in major distro releases.

GNOME 3.36.7 is here to fix Night Light updates after DPMS (Display Power Management Signaling), improve IM (Instant Messaging) handling on X11, address resizing of attached modal dialogs on Wayland, as well as to fix system action search regressions and the alignment of week numbers when using font-scaling in GNOME Shell.

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GNOME 3.38 Brings First Point Release with Massive Fixes

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GNOME

GNOME team announced the first point bug-fix release (3.38.1) for this popular and stable Linux desktop environment.
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WhiteSur: macOS Big Sur Like Gtk, Gnome Shell And Icon Themes For Your Linux Desktop

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Mac
GNOME

WhiteSur Gtk Theme is a macOS Big Sur like theme for Gnome-based desktops, supporting Gnome Shell, Cinnamon, Xfce, Pantheon, Budgie and Mate desktops.

The theme pack comes in both light and dark variants, both having regular (with the sidebar slightly transparent in some applications) and solid versions.

There's also an optional Plank dock theme for those that want to achieve an even closer look to macOS Big Sur. As a side note, if you use Ubuntu and want to disable Ubuntu Dock so you can use Plank dock instead, see this article.
The theme requires Gtk 3.20 or newer, so it should work with most Linux distributions, e.g. from Ubuntu 18.04 to 20.10, etc.

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GNOME 3.38.1

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GNOME

Hi,

GNOME 3.38.1 is now available. This is a stable bugfix release for 3.38. All distributions shipping GNOME 3.38 are encouraged to upgrade.

If you want to compile GNOME 3.38.1, you can use the official BuildStream project snapshot...

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Also: GNOME 3.38.1 Released With An Initial Batch Of Fixes

GNOME 3.38 Desktop Environment Gets First Point Release, Here’s What’s Changed

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GNOME

Released last month, the GNOME 3.38 desktop environment introduces a new GNOME Tour app, a customizable app grid in GNOME Shell, improved multi-monitor support, better screencasting and screen capturing, improved Flatpak support, better support for sandboxed apps, better Wayland support, and much more.

GNOME 3.38.1 is here to fix many issues discovered since the release of GNOME 3.38 across many core components and apps. For example, the Epiphany web browser now opens the portal helper in a new tab and only in non-GNOME environments, and the Flatpak app now supports opening of custom CSS and JavaScript files.

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What is GNOME OS?

Filed under
OS
GNOME

With the release of GNOME 3.38.0, we started producing and distributing bootable VM images for debugging and testing features before they hit any distribution repository. We called the images GNOME OS. The name itself is not new, and what it stands for has not changed dramatically since it was introduced, but let’s restate its goals.

GNOME OS aims to better facilitate development of GNOME by providing a working system for development, design, and user testing purposes.

The main feature of GNOME OS is that we can produce a new system image for each commit made in any of our modules. The ability to have these VM images is truly amazing since we are dealing with hundreds of modules that depend and integrate with each other, and with the lower layers of the OS stack. This effort represents a game changer with regards to being able to automate the boot and session initialization, testing design and implementation changes, catching regressions earlier in the development cycle, and many other possibilities.

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Pop Shell Gets New Window Stacking Feature

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OS
GNOME

Pop Shell may only be available by default in Pop!_OS, but since this is free and open source software, you can install it on any Linux distribution using GNOME Shell 3.36 or 3.38 under X11 (it does not work with Wayland). The extension page mentions it works only with GNOME 3.36, however, I've been using it with GNOME 3.38 for a few hours and it works great, without any single issue so far. In fact, if you want to install it on a few other Linux distributions, I wrote an article on how to install it on Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora, Arch or Manjaro which you can find here (which I updated today).

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Android Leftovers

Games: Godot Engine, Lutris, XCOM, KeeperRL, Ampersat, Europa Universalis and More

  • X11 display server progress report

    I'm Camille, aka PouleyKetchoupp. I use Godot as an indie game developer (Nekomatata) and I've been a Godot contributor for a while (Github). Recently I was hired to work as a contractor on fixes and improvements for the Linux port of Godot 4. Most of the work was dedicated to fixing regressions due to the new Display Server used for window management, which allows support for multiple windows. I've also spent some extra time fixing old issues we had with X11 which required some refactoring in how the engine communicates with the X server. Some of them will be available in a later Godot 3.2 release as well. In this post I'm summarizing all the changes I've made in the X11 Display Server, in order to (hopefully) clarify how the X server works and how Godot communicates with it.

  • Godot Engine to get improved Linux support in the upcoming Godot 4 release | GamingOnLinux

    While the free and open source game engine Godot Engine already has Linux support, for both exported games and the full editor, it's set to get even better in Godot 4.0. In a blog post written by Camille Mohr-Daurat, they mentioned how they've been hired by the Godot team to work as a contractor on fixes and improvements for the Linux port of Godot. Camille Mohr-Daurat is an indie developer who actually uses Godot too at Nekomatata, where they created the unique ping-pong battler Punch Pong. So this is a real fun example of open source in action. Godot 4.0 will be coming with a new windowing system, so that you can separate parts of the Godot Engine editor from the main window. A lot of their work is focused on ensuring that works great on Linux with X11, which seems like there's a lot of work involved, because there's places where X11 doesn't have APIs to handle things where it does on other platforms like Windows and macOS - with drag and drop between windows being one mentioned example they've had to solve directly.

  • Lutris game launcher has a huge new Beta update out for testing | GamingOnLinux

    Lutris is the impressive all-in-one solution for managing games on Linux, bundling tons of sources of Linux releases from different stores under one roof as well as emulators, compatibility layers and more. Just recently on October 19 they put up the Beta of the new 0.5.8 release, and it includes some pretty huge changes and improvements all across the application. The way it actually works under the hood has been completely changed in many ways, along with the way you add games to it. Instead of manually importing games, it now attempts to sync up with your library across other stores like GOG, Humble and Steam. Adding games from the Lutris website using their scripts to set things up is also now in its own section, just called Lutris and it no longer depends on having install scripts for 3rd party services as Lutris will now run stuff with an "auto-generated" script but scripts on the Lutris database will take precedence if available

  • XCOM-ish combat and HOMM-styled world exploration Fort Triumph has a major update and sale | GamingOnLinux

    Possibly one of my favourite strategy game releases of 2020, Fort Triumph blends together XCOM styled combat with HOMM (Heroes of Might and Magic) exploration into quite a gem that doesn't take itself too seriously. What makes it fun is the environment interactions during battles, as you push rocks and drop trees onto enemies - it never gets old. It appears the team at CookieByte Entertainment have been busy too, with a huge free first post-release content upgrade out now. They've added in 27 new locations/events to the world map, and with some of these encounters you can add/remove traits from your heroes. Some of these encounters mix up the combat too, with some being unique Physics-only battles where you can only move around parts of the environment and not use normal abilities which sounds pretty hilarious.

  • KeeperRL, the open source dungeon building sim is getting a price bump in November | GamingOnLinux

    Fancy becoming a dungeon master? Well, if you're watching the pennies you might want to go and pick up KeeperRL before they price gets bumped up. This excellent open source building sim that mixes in RPG and roguelike elements has a lot to like about it, and it's been continually improved over 7 years now. Since it's had a lot added to it, and the developer has been working almost full time on it, they're going to be increasing the price from $14.99 to $20 on November 15. Plenty of notice if you were thinking about picking it up. Keep in mind they also said there will be no discounts planned until the big 1.0 release, so it's not going to be cheaper again any time soon.

  • Ampersat is an upcoming hack and slash shooter where everyone is ASCII | GamingOnLinux

    Mixing together ASCII characters and enemies, along with a full colour world, the hack and slash shooter Ampersat seems like a rather unique blend. A little weird too, with styles that usually clash and don't make sense together. You're the "at sign", the ampersat, and enemies are also these flat characters yet the world is 3D and full of colour. It looks bizarre but it works. Solo developer Gaterooze, Ink mentioned it was inspired by elements of Gauntlet and Smash TV to Zelda and a dash of Angband that "distils some favourite childhood gaming experiences into a fresh, fun hybrid that sees you killing a lot of monsters, finding a lot of loot, freeing captured letters and growing from a world-weary warrior mage into a powerful smashing/blasting machine".

  • Free copy of Europa Universalis II on GOG, with a huge Paradox Interactive sale going on | GamingOnLinux

    Paradox Interactive are celebrating the 20th anniversary of the Europa Universalis series so they're giving away Europa Universalis II and putting a bunch of other games on sale. For the free game, simply head to GOG.com and find the big banner. It doesn't support Linux like Paradox's later games, since it's a proper classic from way back in 2001 but you can try your luck with the Wine compatibility layer if you really want it.

  • Try the demo for Pyramid Plunge, a lighthearted platformer with a really odd couple | GamingOnLinux

    Ah yes, dangerous ancient pyramids with traps and deadly creatures, why not let a totally unprepared couple explore it? That's what you're doing in Pyramid Plunge as you run, carry your partner, fart to get airtime are more. The result is actually quite hilarious, mixing together challenging random generation with a sprinkle of comedy from the two wildly different characters that have a bit of banter between them like a true couple would. You don't see many platformers come along like this, what joy.

  • Proton: The Native Port Killer?

    The thrill surrounding the announcement of Street Fighter V coming to Linux was real. It was a few years after SteamOS was announced. After years of silence, fans started to doubt that this was becoming a reality. It wasn’t until two years after the initial release of Proton that Valve started to work with Capcom to try and make the Windows version compatible with Linux. Some people are still salty that it took this long to get here, and even more upset that this isn’t a native port. On the other hand, fans like myself are pleased that Valve/Capcom held to their word, even though they may have compromised a bit by making it Proton-compatible. The same goes for Rocket League. End-users like myself naturally get upset when delays happen, even though we don’t understand what it’s like to be on the developer’s side. Several months came and went after the original announcement, and finally the Mac and Linux versions of the game went live on Steam. Fast forward a few years later, and Psyonix decides to drop the ball for said versions, leaving it up to Proton to pick up the slack on Linux and bootcamp for Mac OS. Don’t even get me started on the fact that they basically abandoned support on Steam altogether in favor of the Epic Crap Store.

today's howtos

System76 Thelio Mega is a quad-GPU Linux desktop powered by Ryzen Threadripper

System76 began its life as a Linux computer seller only. Essentially, the company would sell re-branded laptops with Ubuntu pre-installed. To provide a class-leading experience, however, System76 also provided top-notch customer service, helping Linux beginners get started with a little hand-holding when needed. This focus on service continues today, and it is largely responsible for the company's success and longevity. Seeking to better control its own destiny, the company branched out from only being a computer-seller and transformed into a maker too. It's handcrafted Thelio desktops are powerful works of art, comprised of wood, metal, and good ol' fashioned American elbow grease. Yes, these Thelio machines are made in the USA -- Colorado, specifically. System76 has even created its own operating system -- the Ubuntu-based Pop!_OS, which has been very well received by the Linux community. This Linux distro will work on most computers -- not just Sytem76 machines. If you want vanilla Ubuntu, don't worry -- the company continues to offer that OS as an option when buying one of its computers. Read more