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GreatFET One open source hacking tool

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Hardware
OSS

Electronic enthusiasts, hobbyists, hackers and makers may be interested in a new open source piece of hardware called the GreatFET One, which has been designed to provide a “significant step up” in capabilities from GoodFET while making the design manufacturable at a lower cost than GoodFET.

“Whether you need an interface to an external chip, a logic analyzer, a debugger, or just a whole lot of pins to bit-bang, the versatile GreatFET One is the tool for you. Hi-Speed USB and a Python API allow GreatFET One to become your custom USB interface to the physical world.” The GreatFET One by Great Scott Gadgets is now available to purchase priced at $79.95 directly from the Adafruit online store.

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Programming: Rust, Python, sphinxcontrib-spelling and More

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Development
  • How to generate a usable map file for Rust code - and related (f)rustrations

    Cargo does not produce a .map file, and if it does, mangling makes it very unusable. If you're searching for the TLDR, read from "How to generate a map file" on the bottom of the article.

  • Converting a Python data into a ReStructured Text table

    This probably exist but I couldn’t find it. I wanted to export a bunch of data from a Python/Django application into something a non-coder could understand. The data was not going to be a plain CSV, but a document, with various tables and explanations of what each table is. Because ReStructured Text seems to be the winning format in the Python world I decided to go with that.

  • Python Anywhere: Using MongoDB on PythonAnywhere with MongoDB Atlas

    Lots of people want to use MongoDB with PythonAnywhere; we don't have support for it built in to the system, but it's actually pretty easy to use with a database provided by MongoDB Atlas -- and as Atlas is a cloud service provided by Mongo's creators, it's probably a good option anyway Smile

    If you're experienced with MongoDB and Atlas, then our help page has all of the details you need for connecting to them from our systems.

    But if you'd just like to dip your toe in the water and find out what all of this MongoDB stuff is about, this blog post explains step-by-step how to get started so that you can try it out.

  • Toward a “Kernel Python”

    Prompted by Amber Brown’s presentation at the Python Language Summit last month, Christian Heimes has followed up on his own earlier work on slimming down the Python standard library, and created a proper Python Enhancement Proposal PEP 594 for removing obviously obsolete and unmaintained detritus from the standard library.

    PEP 594 is great news for Python, and in particular for the maintainers of its standard library, who can now address a reduced surface area. A brief trip through the PEP’s rogues gallery of modules to deprecate or remove1 is illuminating. The python standard library contains plenty of useful modules, but it also hides a veritable necropolis of code, a towering monument to obsolescence, threatening to topple over on its maintainers at any point.

    However, I believe the PEP may be approaching the problem from the wrong direction. Currently, the standard library is maintained in tandem with, and by the maintainers of, the CPython python runtime. Large portions of it are simply included in the hope that it might be useful to somebody. In the aforementioned PEP, you can see this logic at work in defense of the colorsys module: why not remove it? “The module is useful to convert CSS colors between coordinate systems. [It] does not impose maintenance overhead on core development.”

  • EuroPython: EuroPython 2019: Warning - Spoiler alert!

    The device was created and designed by Radomir Dopieralski, a long time EuroPython regular and enthusiastic Python device and robotics builder.

    The PewPew is a simplified game console, programmable with CircuitPython, a variant of MicroPython. It comes with a 64 LED display and a set of small buttons to drive the console.

    We will have one device per attendee with training or conference ticket and plan to give them out together with the badges.

  • sphinxcontrib-spelling 4.3.0

    sphinxcontrib-spelling is a spelling checker for Sphinx-based documentation. It uses PyEnchant to produce a report showing misspelled words.

  • Run-Length Encoding

today's howtos and programming leftovers

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Development
HowTos

Programming: Python, GCC and Bash

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Development

PHP 7.4.0 alpha 1 Released

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Development

PHP team is glad to announce the release of the first PHP 7.4.0 version, PHP 7.4.0 Alpha 1. This starts the PHP 7.4 release cycle, the rough outline of which is specified in the PHP Wiki.

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Also: PHP 7.4 Alpha Released With FFI Extension, Preloading Opcache For Better Performance

Programming: sphinxcontrib.datatemplates, CircuitPython, Python, WebSocket and Mozilla

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Development
  • sphinxcontrib.datatemplates 0.4.0

    sphinxcontrib.datatemplates is an extension for Sphinx to render parts of reStructuredText pages from data files in formats like JSON, YAML, XML, and CSV.

  • Fun with LEDs and CircuitPython

    Nina Zakharenko has been programming for a long time; when she was young she thought that "the idea that I could trick computers into doing what I tell them was pretty awesome". But as she joined the workforce, her opportunities for "creative coding" faded away; she regained some of that working with open source, but tinkering with hardware is what let her creativity "truly explode". It has taken her years to get back what she learned long ago, she said, and her keynote at PyCon 2019 was meant to show attendees the kinds of things can be built with Python—starting with something that attendees would find in their swag bag.

    As part of her shift in thinking, she realized that "software doesn't have to be serious"; it can be used to make art, for example. But she also realized that hardware doesn't need to be serious either, putting up a clip from a YouTube video of "The Breakfast Machine" created by "an incredible maker", Simone Giertz. She showed pictures of some of her own projects (which can be seen in her Speaker Deck slides), such as an Arduino-based iridescent LED headdress.

  • Best 50 Python Books for Programmers with All Skill Sets

    Python has been one of my favorite programming languages ever since I started working with it. While writing this article on Python books, it reminds me of my early days with Python and searching for resources to get going with this simple but amazing programming language. Since its early days, Python has come a long way to establish its dominance in the field of data science and machine learning. For any programming task you can use Python, right from application development to debugging.Python is a powerful programming language and its contribution to the field of data science is second to none. From a simple file search computer program to the script behind self-driving cars, there is data science backed by Python. There is no surprise there is a huge demand for data science experts in today’s tech savvy world.

  • Broadcasting messages to WebSocket API clients

    Invoking individual WebSocket connections has been supported since Zato 3.0 and Zato 3.1 adds new functionality on top of it - message broadcasting - which lets one notify all the clients connected to a particular channel. Here is how to use it.

  • Building a Todo App with Flask in Python

    In this tutorial, we are going to build an API, or a web service, for a todo app. The API service will be implemented using a REST-based architecture.

  • How to create, package and sign a Firefox web extension

    Firefox is one of the most used web browser in the world: it's a free and open source software built by the Mozilla foundation, and it's available for all the major operating systems. The browser has all the features that nowadays are considered standard: tabbed browsing, private navigation, a synchronization system and its functionalities can be extended using third party addons written in Javascript. In this tutorial we will see how to create, build and sign a simple web extension.

  • Socorro: May 2019 happenings

    Socorro is the crash ingestion pipeline for Mozilla's products like Firefox. When Firefox crashes, the crash reporter collects data about the crash, generates a crash report, and submits that report to Socorro. Socorro saves the crash report, processes it, and provides an interface for aggregating, searching, and looking at crash reports.

today's howtos and programming bits

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HowTos

Programming Leftovers

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Programming: Bash, GraphQL and More

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Development
  • How to write a loop in Bash

    A common reason people want to learn the Unix shell is to unlock the power of batch processing. If you want to perform some set of actions on many files, one of the ways to do that is by constructing a command that iterates over those files. In programming terminology, this is called execution control, and one of the most common examples of it is the for loop.

  • Why use GraphQL?

    GraphQL, as I wrote previously, is a next-generation API technology that is transforming both how client applications communicate with backend systems and how backend systems are designed.

    As a result of the support that began with the organization that founded it, Facebook, and continues with the backing of other technology giants such as Github, Twitter, and AirBnB, GraphQL's place as a linchpin technology for application systems seems secure; both now and long into the future.  

  • Things I Learnt The Hard Way (in 30 Years of Software Development)

     

    This is a cynical, clinical collection of things I learnt in 30 years working with software development.

     

    Again, some things are really cynical, others are long observations on different jobs.

  • History of Programming languages

    Behind everything, we do on the computer and on their cell phones stands the code. The code is a specific dictionary of terms and instructions that ultimately leads to what we see users on their computers, such as a website, to a mobile game. There is a multitude of programming languages, but each one is unique. Each of them has a unique set of keywords and specific syntax.

Programming: Intel Graphics Compiler, Bzip2 in Rust, Ract, YAML, Python and YAML

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Development
  • Intel Graphics Compiler 1.0.8 Released With LLVM 9 & GCC 9 Fixes

    The open-source folks maintaining the LLVM-based Intel Graphics Compiler for use by their NEO compute stack for Linux released this week another update.

    Intel Graphics Compiler 1.0.8 is this latest update, which is primarily focused on offering up the remaining fixes for being built by the GCC 9.1 stable compiler and for interfacing with the in-development LLVM Clang 9.0 compiler stack. IGC continues to make use of the LLVM infrastructure to help with the heavy lifting around this graphics compiler. IGC 1.0.8 is currently passing "99.87%" of the certification tests when using LLVM/Clang 9.

  • Bzip2 in Rust: porting the randomization table

    Bzip2's compression starts by running a Burrows-Wheeler Transform on a block of data to compress, which is a wonderful algorithm that I'm trying to fully understand. Part of the BWT involves sorting all the string rotations of the block in question.

    Per the comment I cited, really old versions of bzip2 used a randomization helper to make sorting perform well in extreme cases, but not-so-old versions fixed this.

    This explains why the decompression struct DState has a blockRandomised bit, but the compression struct EState doesn't need one. The fields that the original macro was pasting into EState were just a vestige from 1999, which is when Bzip2 0.9.5 was released.

  • [Older] react-content-marker Released – Marking Content with React

    Last year, in a React side-project, I had to replace some content in a string with HTML markup. That is not a trivial thing to do with React, as you can't just put HTML as string in your content, unless you want to use dangerouslySetInnerHtml — which I don't. So, I hacked a little code to smartly split my string into an array of sub-strings and DOM elements.

    More recently, while working on Translate.Next — the rewrite of Pontoon's translate page to React — I stumbled upon the same problem. After looking around the Web for a tool that would solve it, and coming up short handed, I decided to write my own and make it a library.

  • 10 YAML tips for people who hate YAML

    There are lots of formats for configuration files: a list of values, key and value pairs, INI files, YAML, JSON, XML, and many more. Of these, YAML sometimes gets cited as a particularly difficult one to handle for a few different reasons. While its ability to reflect hierarchical values is significant and its minimalism can be refreshing to some, its Python-like reliance upon syntactic whitespace can be frustrating.

    However, the open source world is diverse and flexible enough that no one has to suffer through abrasive technology, so if you hate YAML, here are 10 things you can (and should!) do to make it tolerable. Starting with zero, as any sensible index should.

  • Creating a Django App on Ubuntu Server

    Django is a common platform for developing websites, web applications and web APIs. There are many advantages to using the Django framework for your project as your tool and if you’re not sure it’s the right fit, you need only to look to the many big name brands using Django in their stack.
    Deploying Django to a production environment for the first time can be a daunting task. Often, developers will launch a Linux instance on the cloud for their production environment.

    In this tutorial, we’ll show you how to launch Django in production, using a fresh Ubuntu instance.

  • Recognizing a face using JavaScript

    When you look around for ways to identify faces, you come up with a host of solutions. Many are generic, some are interfaces to existing frameworks. For JavaScript, you have a few popular ones to choose from. You may even be confused by the array of solutions. Even for face recognition you have several options. Many, most actually, are for Python but you can also find a few in JavaScript. Frameworks that are aimed specifically at face recognition are face,js and face-recognition.js. The latter is considered obsolete though. The smallest, in terms of code, is pico.js With about 200 lines of code it can detect your own face using your webcam. The Pico code comes with a trained set already, which means that it will not improve while you are using it. For the curious, the pre-trained classification cascades are available on their GitHub repository. If you do want to train it yourself, there is a learn function you can use. This is a C program available on GitHub. This is a long process to complete making it an interesting exercise rather than something useful. One of the more interesting API’s is face-api.js, this one uses TensorFlow.js for the machine learning part.

  • Call for Speakers - Montréal-Python 75: Funky Urgency

    Montreal-Python will be hosting its last event before the summer break. This is also a special moment because it's our 75th event!

  • High quality automated docker hub push using Github, TravisCI and pyup for Python tool distributions

    Let's say you want to distribute a Python tool with docker using known good dependency versions ready to be used by end users... In this article you will see how to continuously keeping up to date a Docker Hub container with minimal managing effort (because I'm a lazy guy) using github, TravisCI and pyup.

  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #372 (June 11, 2019)
  • Our Favorite PyCon 2019 Presentations
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