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Python Programming Leftovers

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Development
  • Calculate KS Statistic with Python

    It stands for Kolmogorov–Smirnov which is named after Andrey Kolmogorov and Nikolai Smirnov. It compares the two cumulative distributions and returns the maximum difference between them. It is a non-parametric test which means you don't need to test any assumption related to the distribution of data. In KS Test, Null hypothesis states null both cumulative distributions are similar. Rejecting the null hypothesis means cumulative distributions are different.
    In data science, it compares the cumulative distribution of events and non-events and KS is where there is a maximum difference between the two distributions. In simple words, it helps us to understand how well our predictive model is able to discriminate between events and non-events.

  • Python binding for Kuesa

    KUESA™ is a Qt module designed to load, render and manipulate glTF 2.0 models in applications using Qt 3D.

    Kuesa provides a C++ and a QML API which makes it easy to do things like triggering animations contained in the glTF files, finding camera details defined by the designer, etc.

    It is a great tool so that designers and developers can share glTF based 3D assets.

    With the upcoming release of Kuesa 1.1, we are introducing a python binding for Kuesa. This provides a simple yet powerful way for programmers to integrate glTF content in their python applications with just a few lines of code.

  • Mike Driscoll: PyDev of the Week: Cris Medina

    I was born in the Dominican Republic. I finished highschool there and went to Puerto Rico to study Computer Engineering, specializing in hardware. But I’ve been writing software in some form since I can remember. My dad introduced me to IBM System 360 Basic as my first language. Go figure!

    Most of my professional career (going on 17 years now) was spent doing test engineering, along with developing all the hardware and software tools required to execute those tests and maintain their infrastructure. The rest of the time I’ve held formal software engineering roles.

    I like to spend some of my free time with music. My mother is a music teacher and she got me into piano early on. Though I moved into string instruments as I got older. Today I mostly play classical guitar, but I own several types of guitars and dabble in other string instruments.

  • Backend support merged

    This has been a very exciting week for me, with lots of progress made on my GSoC project. For the past couple of months I've been working on adding the new scipy.fft module which supercedes the existing scipy.fftpack submodule and adds a range of new features and interface improvements. Chief among these planned features was a backend system, allowing users to install their own fft libraries as implementations for the scipy.fft interface.

Top 20 Best Raspberry Pi Projects That You Can Start Right Now

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Development
GNU
Linux
Hardware

The Rasberry Pi is a tiny little computer board that lets students, experts, and hobbyists build innovative computing projects at a very affordable cost. Since its inception 6 years ago, it has enjoyed widespread popularity, thanks to the infinite range of possibilities this system offers. The single-board computer is now in its third major version and is being widely used for numerous tech projects around the world. If you’re looking for the best raspberry pi projects to get you started with this fantastic platform, you’re at the right place. Today, we’ll present to you 20 raspberry pi projects you can take on, starting from basic level to advanced.

Read more

Programming, OSS and GNU

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Development
GNU
OSS
  • How to Split a String in Python
  • The 10 Best Software Engineering Books in 2019

    I’ll probably never forget my first day as a software engineer.

    Back in 2015, I got hired as a software engineer for a consulting company, in Luxembourg.

    I did not have much experience, but I was ready to tackle every single project I was assigned to.

  • GCC 10 Lands OpenRISC Support For Floating Point Instructions

    When it comes to open-source processor ISAs, RISC-V currently captures much of the spotlight but OpenRISC continues chugging along as another open-source CPU architecture. The OpenRISC GCC compiler back-end and other software tooling also continues to move along for this architecture that's been in the works since 2000.

    The OpenRISC back-end/target landed just at the end of 2018 for the current GCC 9 stable series. This OpenRISC "or1k" support continues maturing. It took so long for the OpenRISC support to land into GCC as the original developers of the compiler support wouldn't agree to their copyright assignment to the Free Software Foundation for getting the code merged. As a result, a clean-room rewrite of the GCC OpenRISC code was needed before it could be accepted into GCC.

  • Matthias Clasen: Westcoast hackfest; GTK updates

    old widget. It started out as a port of the tk text widget, and it has not seen a lot of architectural updates over the years. A few years ago, we added a pixel cache to it, to improve its scrolling, but on a high resolution display, its still a lot of pixels to shovel around.

    As we’ve moved widgets to GTK4’s rendering models, everybody avoided GtkTextView, so it was using the fallback cairo rendering path, even as we ported other text rendering in GTK to a new pango renderer which produces render nodes.

    Until yesterday. We decided to just have a look at how hard it would be to switch the text view over to the new pango renderer. This went much more smoothly than we expected, and the new code is in master today.

  • GTK4 Gets Smoother GPU-Accelerated Scrolling, Modern Cursor Blinking

    GNOME developers continue to be hard at work on GTK4 and trying to ensure this major tool-kit update will be a great success.

    Happening the past few days in Portland, Oregon was the "GTK West Coast Hackfest" where Matthias Clasen, Christian Hergert, and other GNOME developers took towards figuring out effectively last minute work for GTK 4.0.

  • GNU Hyperbole 7.0.3 is the latest release
    Hyperbole is an amazing hypertextual information management system 
    that installs quickly and easily as an Emacs package.  It is part of 
    GNU Elpa, the Emacs Lisp Package Archive. 
    Hyperbole interlinks all your working information within Emacs for 
    fast access and editing, not just within special modes.  An hour 
    invested exploring Hyperbole's built-in interactive DEMO file will 
    save you hundreds of hours in your future work. 
    
    
  • Sylvain Beucler: Planet clean-up

    Re-sync Debian base config, scripts and packaging, update documentation; the planet-venus package is still in bad shape though, it's not officially orphaned but the maintainer is unreachable AFAICS

    Fetch all Savannah feeds using https

  • Takeaways from PX4 Open-Source Drone Developer Conference

    Last month at ETH Zurich, Auterion sponsored the first-ever PX4 developer conference for those interested in the open-source-based operating system for enterprise drones. The event, held June 20-21, included 200 attendees from the open-source community, including developers, researchers, and technical thought leaders in the unmanned systems space.

    Here are three takeaway messages from the conference – for those interested in learning more about PX4 and ROS (the largest open-source drone and robotics communities), you can view all of the presentations on PX4’s YouTube channel.

  • Synchronize bookmarks: Syncmarx is now Open Source
  • SuperFreezZ is an open source alternative to Greenify that kills apps running in the background

    Task managers are widely viewed as unnecessary on Android smartphones. Most of us may agree with that view, but the reality is there are still a lot of misbehaving Android apps out there, most task “killers” don’t actually do anything useful besides clearing the recent apps view (which doesn’t really “kill” apps anyway), and a lot of users have yet to upgrade to newer Android versions that have implemented more restrictions on background apps. That’s why, to this very day, apps like Greenify and Brevent remain incredibly popular. Many users swear by both Greenify and Brevent, but since they’re closed source, some users are wary of them. If you’re looking for an open source alternative, check out SuperFreezZ by XDA Junior Member hcur.

today's howtos and programming bits

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Development
HowTos
  • How to fix Ubuntu live USB not booting
  • How to Create a User Account Without useradd Command in Linux?
  • Container use cases explained in depth
  • Containerization and orchestration concepts explained
  • Set_env.py

    A good practice when writing complicated software is to put in lots of debugging code. This might be extra logging, or special modes that tweak the behavior to be more understandable, or switches to turn off some aspect of your test suite so you can focus on the part you care about at the moment.

    But how do you control that debugging code? Where are the on/off switches? You don’t want to clutter your real UI with controls. A convenient option is environment variables: you can access them simply in the code, your shell has ways to turn them on and off at a variety of scopes, and they are invisible to your users.

    Though if they are invisible to your users, they are also invisible to you! How do you remember what exotic options you’ve coded into your program, and how do you easily see what is set, and change what is set?

  • RPushbullet 0.3.2

    A new release 0.3.2 of the RPushbullet package is now on CRAN. RPushbullet is interfacing the neat Pushbullet service for inter-device messaging, communication, and more. It lets you easily send alerts like the one to the left to your browser, phone, tablet, … – or all at once.

    This is the first new release in almost 2 1/2 years, and it once again benefits greatly from contributed pull requests by Colin (twice !) and Chan-Yub – see below for details.

  • A Makefile for your Go project (2019)

    My most loathed feature of Go was the mandatory use of GOPATH: I do not want to put my own code next to its dependencies. I was not alone and people devised tools or crafted their own Makefile to avoid organizing their code around GOPATH.

  • Writing sustainable Python scripts

    Python is a great language to write a standalone script. Getting to the result can be a matter of a dozen to a few hundred lines of code and, moments later, you can forget about it and focus on your next task.

    Six months later, a co-worker asks you why the script fails and you don’t have a clue: no documentation, hard-coded parameters, nothing logged during the execution and no sensible tests to figure out what may go wrong.

    Turning a “quick-and-dirty” Python script into a sustainable version, which will be easy to use, understand and support by your co-workers and your future self, only takes some moderate effort. 

  • Notes to self when using genRSS.py

Programming: Ruby, NativeScript, Python, Rust/C/C++ FUD From Microsoft

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today's howtos and programming bits

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Development
HowTos

Programming Leftovers: Python, Go, LLVM and More

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Development
  • Python List Sorting with sorted() and sort()

    In this article, we'll examine multiple ways to sort lists in Python.

    Python ships with two built-in methods for sorting lists and other iterable objects. The method chosen for a particular use-case often depends on whether we want to sort a list in-place or return a new version of the sorted list.

  • ExpressPython: Lightweight, portable Python editor for small scripts

    There are many IDEs for Python, and it’s time for one more. ExpressPython is a lightweight, small code editor for Python 3. Originally built to help teach students how to code, it can be used in programming competitions, or just when you need a fast, small, clean code editor.
    There are a wide variety of Python IDEs and code editors available for programmers. Between PyCharm, VS Code, IDLE, Spyder, just to name a few, programmers have many to choose from depending on their needs and preferences. Add one more editor to the fray.

    ExpressPython is a small, lightweight Python 3 editor that can help with learning and competitive programming, such as coding challenges. Its creator started work on it in 2014 in order to fulfill a few needs, such as the ability to work offline.

    It is not made with the intent of becoming a fully-featured IDE, and does not include debugging features. However, it does have a few noteworthy features, so let’s take a look.

  • Google's Go team decides not to give it a try

    The Go language will not be adding a "try" keyword in the next major version, despite this being a major part of what was proposed for version 1.14.

    Go, an open source language developed by Google, features static typing and native code compilation. It is around the 15th most popular language according to the Redmonk rankings.

    Error handling in Go is currently based on using if statements to compare a returned error value to nil. If it is nil, no error occurred. This requires developers to write a lot of if statements.

    "In general Go programs have too much code-checking errors and not enough code handling them," wrote Google principal engineer Russ Cox in an overview of the error-handling problem in Go.

  • LLVM 9.0 Feature Work Is Over While LLVM 10.0 Enters Development

    Feature work is over on LLVM 9.0 as the next release for this widely-used compiler stack ranging from the AMDGPU shader compiler back-end to the many CPU targets and other innovative use-cases for this open-source compiler infrastructure.

    Ongoing LLVM release manager Hans Wennborg branched the LLVM 9.0 code-base this morning while in turn opening LLVM 10.0 development on trunk/master. This also marks the 9.0 branching for all LLVM sub-projects.

  • Mu at EuroPython

    Mu made a number of appearances at last week’s wonderful EuroPython 2019 conference in Basel, Switzerland.

  • PyCharm 2019.2 Release Candidate

    PyCharm 2019.2 is almost ready to be released, and we’re happy to announce that a release candidate is available for download now.

today's howtos and programming bits

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Development
HowTos
  • How to fix trailing underscores at the end of URLs in Chrome
  • How to Install Ubuntu Alongside With Windows 10 or 8 in Dual-Boot
  • Beginner’s guide on how to git stash :- A GIT Tutorial
  • Handy snapcraft features: Remote build
  • How to build a lightweight system container cluster
  • Start a new Cryptocurrency project with Python
  • [Mozilla] Celery without a Results Backend
  • Mucking about with microframeworks

    Python does not lack for web frameworks, from all-encompassing frameworks like Django to "nanoframeworks" such as WebCore. A recent "spare time" project caused me to look into options in the middle of this range of choices, which is where the Python "microframeworks" live. In particular, I tried out the Bottle and Flask microframeworks—and learned a lot in the process.

    I have some experience working with Python for the web, starting with the Quixote framework that we use here at LWN. I have also done some playing with Django along the way. Neither of those seemed quite right for this latest toy web application. Plus I had heard some good things about Bottle and Flask at various PyCons over the last few years, so it seemed worth an investigation.

    Web applications have lots of different parts: form handling, HTML template processing, session management, database access, authentication, internationalization, and so on. Frameworks provide solutions for some or all of those parts. The nano-to-micro-to-full-blown spectrum is defined (loosely, at least) based on how much of this functionality a given framework provides or has opinions about. Most frameworks at any level will allow plugging in different parts, based on the needs of the application and its developers, but nanoframeworks provide little beyond request and response handling, while full-blown frameworks provide an entire stack by default. That stack handles most or all of what a web application requires.

    The list of web frameworks on the Python wiki is rather eye-opening. It gives a good idea of the diversity of frameworks, what they provide, what other packages they connect to or use, as well as some idea of how full-blown (or "full-stack" on the wiki page) they are. It seems clear that there is something for everyone out there—and that's just for Python. Other languages undoubtedly have their own sets of frameworks (e.g. Ruby on Rails).

today's howtos and programming bits

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Development
HowTos

Python Programming Leftovers

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Development
  • Generate a List of Random Integers in Python

    This tutorial explains several ways to generate random numbers list in Python. Here, we’ll mainly use three Python random number generation functions. These are random.randint(), random.randrange(), and random.sample().

    You can find full details of these methods here: Generate random numbers in Python. All these functions are part of the Random module. It employs a fast pseudorandom number generator which uses the Mersenne Twister algorithm.

    However today, we’ll focus on producing a list of non-repeating integers only. Go through the below bullets to continue.

  • Coverage.py 5.0a6: context reporting

    I’ve released another alpha of coverage.py 5.0: coverage.py 5.0a6. There are some design decisions ahead that I could use feedback on.

    [...]

    I know this is a lot, and the 5.0 alpha series has been going on for a while. The features are shaping up to be powerful and useful. All of your feedback has been very helpful, keep it coming.

  • Gradient Boosting Classifiers in Python with Scikit-Learn

    Gradient boosting classifiers are a group of machine learning algorithms that combine many weak learning models together to create a strong predictive model. Decision trees are usually used when doing gradient boosting. Gradient boosting models are becoming popular because of their effectiveness at classifying complex datasets, and have recently been used to win many Kaggle data science competitions.

    The Python machine learning library, Scikit-Learn, supports different implementations of gradient boosting classifiers, including XGBoost.

  • What are *args and **kwargs and How to use them
  • Create a Flask Application With Google Login

    You’ve probably seen the option for Google Login on various websites. Some sites also have more options like Facebook Login or GitHub Login. All these options allow users to utilize existing accounts to use a new service.

    In this article, you’ll work through the creation of a Flask web application. Your application will allow a user to log in using their Google identity instead of creating a new account. There are tons of benefits with this method of user management. It’s going to be safer and simpler than managing the traditional username and password combinations.

    This article will be more straightforward if you already understand the basics of Python. It would also help to know a bit about web frameworks and HTTP requests, but that’s not strictly necessary.

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