Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Development

GitHub Reveals Most Popular Programming Languages

Filed under
Development

Python Misc.

Filed under
Development
  • Interview with Mikey Ariel, Django Girls EuroPython 2015

    Django Girls is a rapidly growing initiative that aims to bring more women into world of programming. It started a year ago at EuroPython 2014, and since then Django Girls workshops have been held all over the world. In just a year, more than 1,600 women learned about Python and Django during the workshops and many, many more did it at home by reading their open source Django tutorial.

  • Doing Astronomy with Python

    One of the things that makes Python so powerful is that you can find a module for almost anything. In this article, I cover Astropy, which was originally developed by the Space Telescope Science Institute for doing astronomy calculations like image processing and observatory calculations. Because this is a Python program, you can install it with either pip or easy_install. Your Linux distribution already should have a package included.

  • Shell-o world: Turtle graphics in Python

    One of my teacher colleagues recently shared his strategies for using Turtle graphics with Python. This piqued my interest (due to my earlier experiences). Since Python is included with most Linux distributions, I was eager to meet my old friend the Turtle.

    To begin, I needed to install Python's graphical interface, Tkinter. Once I accomplished that, I was ready to begin. I opened a terminal, typed "python," and pressed Enter.

    At the Python prompt, I typed "import turtle"—and was ready to begin. At the prompt, I typed, "turtle.forward(100)" and pressed Enter. The graphical interface appeared, and the turtle moved 100 turtle steps forward.

    You can use many commands to turn, change the pen color, pick up the pen, change the background color, and more. The Python documentation is very good.

GNOME Control Center Gets a Major Revamp with LTE and Pyongyang Time Support

Filed under
Development
GNOME

The development team behind the GNOME Project is hard at work these days preparing to release the first Beta build of the upcoming GNOME Control Center app, an essential component of the anticipated GNOME 3.18 desktop environment, due for release on September 23, 2015.

Read more

Also: GNOME Maps Gets Support for Copying Geo URIs in GNOME 3.18

GTK+ 3.18 to Receive Support for Touchpad Gesture Events for Wayland

Filed under
Development

The developers of the famous GTK+ GUI (Graphical User Interface) toolkit are hard at work these days preparing for the final release of the GTK+ 3.18 software, which will be distributed as part of the GNOME 3.18 desktop environment.

Read more

Geary 0.10.0 Email Client Lands in Elementary OS

Filed under
Development

Geary is the default email client default in Elementary OS and it's also present in a number of other repositories as well. Developers have just made an important upgrade to it that should turn some heads.

Read more

Love for Perl unites diverse community

Filed under
Development
OSS

I've used Perl for several years, beginning in 2002 on Solaris, then moving to Debian and working on Koha in 2008. Surprisingly (bafflingly, in retrospect), I had not connected with the larger Perl community at all in that time, choosing to stay within the smaller communities I was already embedded in.

Read more

Linux 4.2-rc6

Filed under
Development
Linux

So last week I wasn't very happy about the state of the release candidates, but things are looking up. Not only is rc6 finally shrinking noticeably, the issues I was worried about had fixes come in early in the week, and so I don't have anything big pending. Assuming nothing new comes up, I suspect we will end up with the regular release schedule after all (ie in two weeks). Knock wood.

In -rc6 , the diffstat looks a bit odd, in that the ARC arch updates dominate (at around 30% of the diffs). That's partly because the rest is pretty small, and partly because the llock/scond livelock fix wasn't tiny. But I don't find it in myself to worry about it.

Apart from that ARC oddity, things look normal. Mostly drivers (gpu, sound, i2c, input, usb, thermal, you name it) and other architecture updates (mips and sparc). With some filesystem and VM fixes rounding up the changes.

But please go out and test, and make sure all the issues really are solved. Ok?

Linus

Read more

Also:

Why Open Source Software Growth Is Rising

Filed under
Development
Interviews
OSS

GitHub CEO Chris Wanstrath discusses open source software and GitHub’s plan to expand internationally. He speaks with Bloomberg’s Emily Chang on “Bloomberg West.”

Read more

Announcing the shutdown of the Ada Initiative

Filed under
Development
OSS

It is with mixed feelings that we announce that the Ada Initiative will be
shutting down in approximately mid-October. We are proud of what we
accomplished with the support of many thousands of volunteers, sponsors,
and donors, and we expect all of our programs to continue on in some form
without the Ada Initiative. Thank you for your incredible work and support!

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Themes With Emphasis on GTK/GNOME

  • Stylish Gtk Themes Makes Your Linux Desktop Look Stylish
    There are plenty of nice themes available for Gnome desktop and many of them are in active development. Stylish theme pack is one of the great looking pack around since 2014 and constantly evolving. It offers stylish clean and flat design themes for Gtk-3 and Gtk-2, including Gnome shell themes. Stylish theme pack is based Materia theme and support almost every desktop environment such as Gnome, Cinnamon, Mate, Xfce, Mate, Budgie, Panteon, etc. We are offering Stylish themes via our PPA for Ubuntu/Linux Mint. If you are using distribution other than Ubuntu/Linux Mint then download this pack directly from its page and install it in this location "~/.themes" or "/usr/share/themes". Since Stylish theme pack is in active development that means if you encounter any kind of bug or issue with it then report it to get fixed in the next update.
  • Delft: Another Great Icon Pack In Town Forked From Faenza Icons
    In past, you may have used Faenza icon theme or you still have it set on your desktop. Delft icons are revived version of Faenza and forked from Faenza icon theme, maybe it is not right to say 'revived' because it looks little different from Faenza theme and at the same time it stays close to the original Faenza icons, it is released under license GNU General Public License V3. The theme was named after a dutch city, which is known for its history, its beauty, and Faenza in Italy. The author who is maintaining Delft icons saw that Faenza icons haven't been updated from some years and thought to carry this project. There are some icons adopted from the Obsidian icon theme. Delft icon pack offer many variants (Delft, Delft-Amber, Delft-Aqua, Delft-Blue, Delft-Dark, Delft-Gray, Delft-Green, Delft-Mint, Delft-Purple, Delft-Red, Delft-Teal) including light and dark versions for light/dark themes, you can choose appropriate one according to your desktop theme. These icons are compatible with most of the Linux desktop environments such as Gnome, Unity, Cinnamon, Mate, Lxde, Xfce and others. Many application icons available in this icons pack and if you find any missing icon or want to include something in this icon pack or face any kind of bug then report it to creator.
  • Give Your Desktop A Sweet Outlook With Sweet Themes Give Your Desktop A Sweet Outlook With Sweet Themes
    It is feels bit difficult to describe this theme we are going to introduce here today. Sweet theme pack looks and feel very different on the desktop but at the same time make the Linux desktop elegant and eye catching. Maybe these are not perfect looking themes available but it lineup in the perfect theme queue. You may say, I don't like it in screenshots, let me tell you that you should install it on your system and if you don't like then you already have option to remove it. So there is no harm to try a new thing, maybe this is next best theme pack for your Linux desktop.

Pecking order cheap sldnfl no formula

what dose viagra herb viagra for sale http:juki.host-page.com4083buy+viagra+-+generic+and+brand.htmldiscount-viagra viagra for sale - cialis 20mg dosage password cialis for daily use prices logged what dose viagra herb viagra for sale http:juki.host-page.com4083buy+viagra+-+generic+and+brand.htmldiscount-viagra viagra for sale - cialis 20mg dosage password cialis for daily use prices logged

Pecking order stingy sldnfl no instruction

viagra from canada getting started viagra for men for sale viagra from canada online login with username password and session length viagra for men for sale - cialis 20mg dosage password how much cialis should i take each time viagra from canada getting started viagra for men for sale viagra from canada online login with username password and session length viagra for men for sale - cialis 20mg dosage password how much cialis should i take each time

Open-source hardware could defend against the next generation of hacking

Imagine you had a secret document you had to store away from prying eyes. And you have a choice: You could buy a safe made by a company that kept the workings of its locks secret. Or you could buy a safe whose manufacturer openly published the designs, letting everyone – including thieves – see how they’re made. Which would you choose? It might seem unexpected, but as an engineering professor, I’d pick the second option. The first one might be safe – but I simply don’t know. I’d have to take the company’s word for it. Maybe it’s a reputable company with a longstanding pedigree of quality, but I’d be betting my information’s security on the company upholding its traditions. By contrast, I can judge the security of the second safe for myself – or ask an expert to evaluate it. I’ll be better informed about how secure my safe is, and therefore more confident that my document is safe inside it. That’s the value of open-source technology. Read more