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Development

KDevelop 5.1.2 released

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Development
KDE

We are pleased to announce the release of KDevelop version 5.1.2, the second bug-fix release for the 5.1 series. This update contains bug fixes only, and we highly recommend all users of KDevelop 5.1.x to switch to this version. Given that it has been a few months since the release of KDevelop 5.1.1, this version contains quite a lot of changes.

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Programming: GitHub, Monitoring Network Traffic, Encryption

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Development
  • This Week in Numbers: Comparing Corporate Open Source Contributions on GitHub Organizations

    ...a significant amount of development works happens outside of an employer’s GitHub organization accounts. For example, Red Hat employees represent a significant number of contributors across a wide range of cloud and container-related projects, but may not get recognized for this because it occurs in non-corporate organizations. Furthermore, it is common for a company to create a separate organization for popular projects. Thus, using this methodology Google does not get recognized for its Angular project, but Facebook gets to bask in React’s glow.

  • Monitoring network traffic more efficiently

    In today’s data networks, traffic analysis — determining which links are getting congested and why — is usually done by computers at the network’s edge, which try to infer the state of the network from the times at which different data packets reach their destinations.

    If the routers inside the network could instead report on their own circumstances, network analysis would be much more precise and efficient, enabling network operators to more rapidly address problems. To that end, router manufacturers have begun equipping their routers with counters that can report on the number of data packets a router has processed in a given time interval.

  • 5 Important Skills That Are About To Die Forever

    One Programmer Owns The World's Best Email Encryption Software, And He's Struggling To Make Ends Meet

Programming: Reducing Python's Startup Time, Makefiles for Golang, Boostnote, OpenJDK and More

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Development
  • Reducing Python's startup time

    The startup time for the Python interpreter has been discussed by the core developers and others numerous times over the years; optimization efforts are made periodically as well. Startup time can dominate the execution time of command-line programs written in Python, especially if they import a lot of other modules. Python startup time is worse than some other scripting languages and more recent versions of the language are taking more than twice as long to start up when compared to earlier versions (e.g. 3.7 versus 2.7). The most recent iteration of the startup time discussion has played out in the python-dev and python-ideas mailing lists since mid-July. This time, the focus has been on the collections.namedtuple() data structure that is used in multiple places throughout the standard library and in other Python modules, but the discussion has been more wide-ranging than simply that.

  • Makefiles for Golang

    Go's toolchain is awesome. make makes the toolchain awesome-er. Go's fast compile times and internal change-tracking eliminate the need for esoteric Makefiles. This is great since we can write simple Makefiles to get the job done in style.

  • Boostnote changes programmers’ note-taking experience

    Hi programmers, what apps do you use for your note-taking? Default Note-app? Evernote?

    But you know, it’s sometimes not useful to use for programming things.

  • OpenJDK may tackle Java security gaps with secretive group

    The proposed OpenJDK (Java Development Kit) Vulnerability Group would provide a secure, private forum in which trusted members of the community receive reports on vulnerabilities in code bases and then review and fix them. Coordinating the release of fixes also would be part of the group’s mandate. (Java SE, the standard edition of Java, has been developed under the auspices of OpenJDK.)

  • Final GSoC Blog Post – Results

    This is my final GSoC update post. My name is Paul Schaub and I participated in the Google Summer of Code for the XMPP Standards Foundation. My project was about implementing encrypted Jingle File Transfer for the client library Smack.

  • BH 1.65.0-1

GNOME: Development, GUADEC, and Recipes

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Development
GNOME
  • The joy of rebuilding…

    I guess we all kind of enjoy breaking things and them fixing them up. It might be one of the reasons we want to be programmers. Find a bug, patch it up, test it, break something with what seemed like a good idea, rollback to an earlier version, fix again… etc. It just never ends. And believe it or not, sometimes it really is fun. Sometimes. Unfortunately for me, what follows is a description of one of the other situations, when you really wouldn’t want your precious build to go nuts, but it does. Spoiler: it does have a happy ending, no worries Smile.

  • GUADEC 2017

    It’s summer and it’s GUADEC time! This year’s GUADEC took place in Manchester, England. It was surprisingly less bad for that location Wink The organisers deserve a big round of applause for having pulled the event off. After having organised last year’s GUADEC I have first hands experience running such an event. So a big “thank you” to the team from England Smile

  • Recipes : Wrapping up GSoC ’17

    Its been almost three months that I embarked on GSoC journey with GNOME. And its time to wrap it up. So here it goes ..

Swift/BSD/LLVM

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Development
BSD

Programming: Agile, Go 1.9, and Teaching Kids Coding

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Development
  • Blog: Adopting an Agile Warrior Mindset Toward Software Development

    Companies and individual tech teams must tailor their approaches to meeting customer needs by using open source practices and assuming an agile warrior mindset...

  • Go 1.9 is released

    Today the Go team is happy to announce the release of Go 1.9. You can get it from the download page. There are many changes to the language, standard library, runtime, and tooling. This post covers the most significant visible ones. Most of the engineering effort put into this release went to improvements of the runtime and tooling, which makes for a less exciting announcement, but nonetheless a great release.

  • Go 1.9 Adds Type Aliases, Parallel Compilation

    Version 1.9 of Google's Go programming language is now available for developers.

    Go 1.9 features a variety of changes, including on the language front where there is now support for type aliases. Exciting me a lot about Go 1.9 is that it now supports compiling functions for a package in parallel. The concurrent compilation of functions should really speed up the build process and is enabled by default although there is an option to disable it if you so choose.

  • Teaching Kids Coding, by the Book

    One sunny summer morning this month, a group of 20 teenage girls gathered in a conference room in the sleek offices of a tech company in Manhattan. It was their fifth week of coding camp, and they were huddled around laptops, brainstorming designs for their final projects. One group was building a computer game that simulates the experience of going through life with depression and anxiety, while others were drafting plans for websites that track diversity at companies and help connect newly arrived immigrants with local community groups.

    They were working intently when Reshma Saujani, the founder and chief executive of the nonprofit organization Girls Who Code, dropped in to offer some encouragement.

Kernel and Graphics: Linux 4.12.9, 4.9.45, 4.4.84, and 3.18.67, Driver Development

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Development
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Licensing and Development: Patrick McHardy, React's Open Source [sic] Licence, Programming Success

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Development
Legal
  • Patrick McHardy and copyright profiteering

    Many in the open source community have expressed concern about the activities of Patrick McHardy in enforcing the GNU General Public License (GPL) against Linux distributors. Below are answers to common questions, based on public information related to his activities, and some of the legal principles that underlie open source compliance enforcement.

    Who is Patrick McHardy? McHardy is the former chair of the Netfilter core development team. Netfilter is a utility in the Linux kernel that performs various network functions, such as facilitating Network Address Translation (NAT)—the process of converting an Internet protocol address into another IP address. Controlling network traffic is important to maintain the security of a Linux system.

  • Facebook Refuses to Alter React's Open Source License

    The Apache Foundation recently announced that Facebook's BSD+Patents open source license has been disallowed for inclusion with Apache products. The resulting fallout has caused gnashed teeth and much soul searching for React developers and Facebook has so far refused to reconsider.

  • Users as Co Developers OR The Secret of Programming Success

    And so I inherited popclient. Just as importantly, I inherited popclient’s user base. Users are wonderful things to have, and not just because they demonstrate that you’re serving a need, that you’ve done something right. Properly cultivated, they can become co-developers.

    Another strength of the Unix tradition, one that Linux pushes to a happy extreme, is that a lot of users are hackers too. Because source code is available, they can be effective hackers. This can be tremendously useful for shortening debugging time. Given a bit of encouragement, your users will diagnose problems, suggest fixes, and help improve the code far more quickly than you could unaided.

  • Oracle to open source Java Enterprise Edition (JAVA EE)

    They say that you can never expect a favor from the corporate world without them getting some profit. Oracle seems to be shutting shop on Java Enterprise Edition (Java EE) and has now decided to open source it.  After earning millions from Java EE, now Oracle seems to have realized that it needs to move on.

Programming: Java EE, Developer Skills, modulemd, QtWebKit, GnuTLS, React.js Licence

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Development
  • Opening Up Java EE

    We continue to make great progress on Java EE 8. Specifications are nearly complete, and we expect to deliver the reference implementation this summer. As we approach the delivery of Java EE 8 and the JavaOne 2017 conference, we believe there is an opportunity to rethink how Java EE is developed in order to make it more agile and responsive to changing industry and technology demands.

  • Trending Developer Skills, Based on my Analysis of “Ask HN: Who’s Hiring?”

    For people learning to code and for experienced software developers alike, change is constant. There is always something new to learn. This includes programming languages, web frameworks, DevOps automation, mobile devices, front-end and back-end development, SQL and NoSQL databases, and so on.

  • modulemd 1.3.0

    I almost forgot! Last week I released modulemd-1.3.0, the module metadata format specification and its reference Python implementation.

    This release defines just three new fields but all of them are pretty important.

  • QtWebKit on FreeBSD

    Over at lwn.net, there is an article on the coming WebKitGTK apocalypse. Michael Catanzaro has pointed out the effects of WebKit’s stalled development processes before, in 2016.

    So here’s the state of WebKit on FreeBSD, from the KDE-FreeBSD perspective (and a little bit about the GTK ports, too).

  • GnuTLS 3.6.0 released

    We are proud to announce a new GnuTLS release: Version 3.6.0.

    GnuTLS is a modern C library that implements the standard network security protocol Transport Layer Security (TLS), for use by network applications. GnuTLS is developed for GNU/Linux, but works on many Unix-like systems as well as Windows.

    The GnuTLS library is distributed under the terms of the GNU Lesser General Public License version 2 (or later).

  • Apache Foundation and Facebook in Standoff Over React.js License

    Here's a story that has the two things that open source advocates like to fight about discuss most: licenses and software patents. It started on July 15 when the Apache Foundation's legal affairs director, Chris Mattmann, made a comment to a thread on a discussion board that began two months discussing a little quirk that had been found in the wording of Facebook's open source BSD-plus-Patents license.

Development: DragonEgg, GCC, LLVM, and Java EE

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Development
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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • [LabPlot] Improved data fitting in 2.5
    Until now, the fit parameters could in principle take any values allowed by the fit model, which would lead to a reasonable description of the data. However, sometimes the realistic regions for the parameters are known in advance and it is desirable to set some mathematical constrains on them. LabPlot provides now the possibility to define lower and/or upper bounds for the fit parameters and to limit the internal fit algorithm to these regions only.
  • [GNOME] Maps Towards 3.28
    Some work has been done since the release of 3.26 in September. On the visual side we have adapted the routing sidebar to use a similar styling as is used in Files (Nautilus) and the GTK+ filechooser.
  • MX 17 Beta 2
  • MiniDebconf in Toulouse
    I attended the MiniDebconf in Toulouse, which was hosted in the larger Capitole du Libre, a free software event with talks, presentation of associations, and a keysigning party. I didn't expect the event to be that big, and I was very impressed by its organization. Cheers to all the volunteers, it has been an amazing week-end!
  • DebConf Videoteam sprint report - day 0
    First day of the videoteam autumn sprint! Well, I say first day, but in reality it's more day 0. Even though most of us have arrived in Cambridge already, we are still missing a few people. Last year we decided to sprint in Paris because most of our video gear is stocked there. This year, we instead chose to sprint a few days before the Cambridge Mini-Debconf to help record the conference afterwards.
  • Libre Computer Board Launches Another Allwinner/Mali ARM SBC
    The Tritium is a new ARM single board computer from the Libre Computer Board project. Earlier this year the first Libre Computer Board launched as the Le Potato for trying to be a libre and free software minded ARM SBC. That board offered better specs than the Raspberry Pi 3 and aimed to be "open" though not fully due to the ARM Mali graphics not being open.
  • FOSDEM 2018 Will Be Hosting A Wayland / Mesa / Mir / X.Org Developer Room
    This year at the FOSDEM open-source/Linux event in Brussels there wasn't the usual "X.Org dev room" as it's long been referred to, but for 2018, Luc Verhaegen is stepping back up to the plate and organizing this mini graphics/X.Org developer event within FOSDEM.
  • The Social Network™ releases its data networking code
    Facebook has sent another shiver running up Cisco's spine, by releasing the code it uses for packet routing. Open/R, its now-open source routing platform, runs Facebook's backbone and data centre networks. The Social Network™ first promised to release the platform in May 2017. In the post that announced the release, Facebook said it began developing Open/R for its Terragraph wireless system, but since applied it to its global fibre network, adding: “we are even starting to roll it out into our data center fabrics, running inside FBOSS and on our Open Compute Project networking hardware like Wedge 100.”
  • Intel Icelake Support Added To LLVM Clang
    Initial support for Intel's Icelake microarchitecture that's a follow-on to Cannonlake has been added to the LLVM/Clang compiler stack. Last week came the Icelake patch to GCC and now Clang has landed its initial Icelake enablement too.
  • Microsoft's Surface Book 2 has a power problem
     

    Microsoft’s Surface Book 2 has a power problem. When operating at peak performance, it may draw more power than its stock charger or Surface Dock can handle. What we’ve discovered after talking to Microsoft is that it’s not a bug—it’s a feature.

Kernel: Linux 4.15 and Intel

  • The Big Changes So Far For The Linux 4.15 Kernel - Half Million New Lines Of Code So Far
    We are now through week one of two for the merge window of the Linux 4.15 kernel. If you are behind on your Phoronix reading with the many feature recaps provided this week of the different pull requests, here's a quick recap of the changes so far to be found with Linux 4.15:
  • Intel 2017Q3 Graphics Stack Recipe Released
    Intel's Open-Source Technology Center has put out their quarterly Linux graphics driver stack upgrade in what they are calling the latest recipe. As is the case with the open-source graphics drivers just being one centralized, universal component to be easily installed everywhere, their graphics stack recipe is just the picked versions of all the source components making up their driver.
  • Intel Ironlake Receives Patches For RC6 Power Savings
    Intel Ironlake "Gen 5" graphics have been around for seven years now since being found in Clarkdale and Arrandale processors while finally now the patches are all worked out for enabling RC6 power-savings support under Linux.

Red Hat: OpenStack and Financial News

Security: Google and Morgan Marquis-Boire

  • Google: 25 per cent of black market passwords can access accounts

    The researchers used Google's proprietary data to see whether or not stolen passwords could be used to gain access to user accounts, and found that an estimated 25 per cent of the stolen credentials can successfully be used by cyber crooks to gain access to functioning Google accounts.

  • Data breaches, phishing, or malware? Understanding the risks of stolen credentials

    Drawing upon Google as a case study, we find 7--25\% of exposed passwords match a victim's Google account.

  • Infosec star accused of sexual assault booted from professional affiliations
    A well-known computer security researcher, Morgan Marquis-Boire, has been publicly accused of sexual assault. On Sunday, The Verge published a report saying that it had spoken with 10 women across North America and Marquis-Boire's home country of New Zealand who say that they were assaulted by him in episodes going back years. A woman that The Verge gave the pseudonym "Lila," provided The Verge with "both a chat log and a PGP signed and encrypted e-mail from Morgan Marquis-Boire. In the e-mail, he apologizes at great length for a terrible but unspecified wrong. And in the chat log, he explicitly confesses to raping and beating her in the hotel room in Toronto, and also confesses to raping multiple women in New Zealand and Australia."