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Programming: GCN, Python, Rust, RcppArmadillo

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Development

Programming: Django, PHP, Polonius and More

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Development
  • Django 2.2 alpha 1 released

    Django 2.2 alpha 1 is now available. It represents the first stage in the 2.2 release cycle and is an opportunity for you to try out the changes coming in Django 2.2.

    Django 2.2 has a salmagundi of new features which you can read about in the in-development 2.2 release notes.

  • Eliminating PHP polyfills

    The Symfony project has recently created a set of pure-PHP polyfills for both PHP extensions and newer language features. It allows developers to add requirements upon those functions or language additions without increasing the system requirements upon end users. For the most part, I think this is a good thing, and valuable to have. We've done similar things inside MediaWiki as well for CDB support, Memcached, and internationalization, just to name a few.

    But the downside is that on platforms where it is possible to install the missing PHP extensions or upgrade PHP itself, we're shipping empty code. MediaWiki requires both the ctypes and mbstring PHP extensions, and our servers have those, so there's no use in deploying polyfills for those, because they'll never be used. In September, Reedy and I replaced the polyfills with "unpolyfills" that simply provide the correct package, so the polyfill is skipped by composer. That removed about 3,700 lines of code from what we're committing, reviewing, and deploying - a big win.

  • Polonius and region errors

    Now that NLL has been shipped, I’ve been doing some work revisiting the Polonius project. Polonius is the project that implements the “alias-based formulation” described in my older blogpost. Polonius has come a long way since that post; it’s now quite fast and also experimentally integrated into rustc, where it passes the full test suite.

  • Serious Python released!

    Well, Serious Python is the the new name of The Hacker's Guide to Python — the first book I published. Serious Python is the 4th update of that book — but with a brand a new name and a new editor!

Programming: Panda 3D Game Project, Skills in 2019, Golang Mastery, Python and Mozilla

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Development
  • Create Panda 3D Game Project

    Hello, do you still remember that I have mentioned to you before that I will start another game project alongside the new pygame project? Well, I have not decided yet which game framework should I use to build the python game. Yesterday I had just came across Panda 3D which is a very attractive game framework that we can use to create the python game.

  • Top technical skills that will get you hired in 2019

    Landing the perfect IT job is never easy, but certain technical skills can smooth the way, especially if they’re in high demand. Job search platform Indeed has analyzed the fastest-growing terms used by job seekers when searching for tech jobs in 2019, and the results represent some significant changes over last year.

    “When people look for new jobs, they often use search terms that describe cutting-edge skills associated with the jobs they want,” says Daniel Culbertson, economist at Indeed. “On the employer side, the highly specialised tech talent who have these proficiencies are in great demand.”

  • 5 open source Go tools for tuning up your Golang mastery

    Love programming in Go? It’s hard not to fall in love with it, we know! Today we browsed through some Golang tools on GitHub and picked some of our favorites from the list. Far from exhaustive, this list highlights some of the best in show.

  • Executing Shell Commands with Python
  • Introduction to Python
  • Convert video from one format to another with python
  • L10n report: January edition

Programming: Python 'Standard', sr.ht and Wing Python IDE 6.1.4

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  • What should be in the Python standard library?

    Python has always touted itself as a "batteries included" language; its standard library contains lots of useful modules, often more than enough to solve many types of problems quickly. From time to time, though, some have started to rethink that philosophy, to reduce or restructure the standard library, for a variety of reasons. A discussion at the end of November on the python-dev mailing list revived that debate to some extent.

    Jonathan Underwood raised the issue, likely unknowingly, when he asked about possibly adding some LZ4 compression library bindings to the standard library. As the project page indicates, it fits in well with the other compression modules already in the standard library. Responses were generally favorable or neutral, though some, like Brett Cannon, wondered if it made sense to broaden the scope a bit to create something similar to hashlib but for compression algorithms.

  • A new free-software forge: sr.ht

    Many projects have adopted the "GitHub style" of development over the last few years, though, of course, there are some high-profile exceptions that still use patches and mailing lists. Many projects are leery of putting all of their project metadata into a proprietary service, with limited means of usefully retrieving it should that be necessary, which is why GitLab (which is at least "open core") has been gaining some traction. A recently announced effort looks to kind of bridge the gap; Drew DeVault's sr.ht ("the hacker's forge") combines elements of both styles of development in a "100% free and open source software forge". It looks to be an ambitious project, but it may also suffer from a lack of "social network" effects, which is part of what sustains GitHub as the forge of choice today, it seems.

    The announcement blog post is replete with superlatives about sr.ht, which is "pronounced 'sir hat', or any other way you want", but it is a bit unclear whether the project quite lives up to all of that. It combines many of the features seen at sites like GitHub and GitLab—Git hosting, bug tracking, continuous integration (CI), mailing list management, wikis—but does so in a way that "embraces and improves upon the email-based workflow favored by git itself, along with many of the more hacker-oriented projects around the net". The intent is that each of the separate services integrate well with both sr.ht and with the external ecosystem so that projects can use it piecemeal.

    There are two sides to the sr.ht coin at this point; interested users can either host their own instance or use the hosted version. For now, the hosted version is free to use, since it is still "alpha", but eventually one will need to sign up for a plan, which range from $2 to $10 per month, to stay on the hosted service. There are instructions for getting sr.ht to run on other servers; it uses nginx, PostgreSQL, Redis, and Python 3 along with a mail server and a cron daemon.

  • Wing Python IDE 6.1.4

    This minor release fixes using typing.IO and similar classes as type hints, improves handling of editor splits in goto-definition, fixes failure to install the remote agent, and fixes failure to convert EOLs in the editor. See the change log for details.

Builder 3.32 Sightings

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Development
GNOME

We just landed the largest refactor to Builder since it’s inception. Somewhere around 100,000 lines of code where touched which is substantial for a single development cycle. I wrote a few tools to help us do that work, because that’s really the only way to do such a large refactor.

Not only does the refactor make things easier for us to maintain but it will make things easier for contributors to write new plugins. In a future blog post I’ll cover some of the new design that makes it possible.

Let’s take a look at some of the changes in Builder for 3.32 as users will see them.

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Programming: gVisor/Go, Rust, and Python

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Development
  • gVisor: Building and Battle Testing a Userspace OS in Go

    Adin Scannell talks about gVisor - a container runtime that implements the Linux kernel API in userspace using Go. He talks about the architectural challenges associated with userspace kernels, the positive and negative experiences with Go as an implementation language, and finally, how to ensure API coverage and compatibility.

  • Rust bindings for GStreamerGL: Memoirs

    Rust is a great programming language but the community around it’s just amazing. Those are the ingredients for the craft of useful software tools, just like Servo, an experimental browser engine designed for tasks isolation and high parallelization.

    Both projects, Rust and Servo, are funded by ">">Mozilla.

    Thanks to Mozilla and Igalia I have the opportunity to work on Servo, adding it HTML5 multimedia features.

    First, with the help of Fernando Jiménez, we finished what my colleague Philippe Normand and Sebastian Dröge (one of my programming heroes) started: a media player in Rust designed to be integrated in Servo. This media player lives in its own crate: servo/media along with the WebAudio engine. A crate, in Rust jargon, is like a library. This crate is (very ad-hocly) designed to be multimedia framework agnostic, but the only backend right now is for GStreamer. Later we integrated it into Servo adding an initial support for audio and video tags.

    Currently, servo/media passes, through a IPC channel, the array with the whole frame to render in Servo. This implies, at least, one copy of the frame in memory, and we would like to avoid it.

    For painting and compositing the web content, Servo uses WebRender, a crate designed to use the GPU intensively. Thus, if instead of raw frame data we pass OpenGL textures to WebRender the performance could be enhanced notoriously.

  • proc-macro-rules
  • Analyzing Robinhood trade history

Programming: Flask, Agile, Rust and Python

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Development
  • How to build an API for a machine learning model in 5 minutes using Flask

    As a data scientist consultant, I want to make impact with my machine learning models. However, this is easier said than done. When starting a new project, it starts with playing around with the data in a Jupyter notebook. Once you’ve got a full understanding of what data you’re dealing with and have aligned with the client on what steps to take, one of the outcomes can be to create a predictive model.

    You get excited and go back to your notebook to make the best model possible. The model and the results are presented and everyone is happy. The client wants to run the model in their infrastructure to test if they can really create the expected impact. Also, when people can use the model, you get the input necessary to improve it step by step. But how can we quickly do this, given that the client has some complicated infrastructure that you might not be familiar with?

  • What is Small Scale Scrum?

    Agile is fast becoming a mainstream way industries act, behave, and work as they look to improve efficiency, minimize costs, and empower staff. Most software developers naturally think, act, and work this way, and alignment towards agile software methodologies has gathered pace in recent years.

    VersionOne’s 2018 State of Agile report shows that scrum and its variants remain the most popular implementation of agile. This is in part due to changes made to the Scrum Guide’s wording in recent years that make it more amenable to non-software industries.

  • This Week in Rust 269
  • Async IO in Python: A Complete Walkthrough

    Async IO is a concurrent programming design that has received dedicated support in Python, evolving rapidly from Python 3.4 through 3.7, and probably beyond.

    You may be thinking with dread, “Concurrency, parallelism, threading, multiprocessing. That’s a lot to grasp already. Where does async IO fit in?”

    This tutorial is built to help you answer that question, giving you a firmer grasp of Python’s approach to async IO.

Top 15 Best Git Clients for Linux

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Development
Software

As a Linux user, you need to update software source code frequently. You may use a command line to do the task. But, when you need to handle a large project, then it becomes lengthy and difficult also. On the other hand, it is also quite impossible to point out the entire branch structure using the command line.

Nowadays, all the mastermind Linux users are frequently using Git tools for the software controlling management and development. The tasks are very simple and quite easier with git client Linux. That is why we take the step to introduce you to some of the best git clients for Linux.

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Programming: Go, JavaScript, Data Science Programming Languages and PyFilesystem

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Development
  • How To Learn Go Programming Language

    First appeared in November 2009, Go is a statically typed, compiled programming language designed at Google. You might have just heard about this programming language in the past couple of years but recently, Go has started to gain significant popularity in the coding world.

    Being light-weight, open source, and suited for today’s microservices architectures, Go is an amazing choice for a language. Also known as Google’s Golang, this language was developed by some of the brilliant minds from Google who created the C programming language. Today, it is one of the fastest growing languages and it’s absolutely a great time to start learning and working with GO.

  • Review: The 6 best JavaScript IDEs

    Back in the ancient days when Java Swing was new and exciting, I enjoyed using Eclipse for Java development, but soon moved on to other Java IDEs. Five-plus years ago, when I did some Android development with Eclipse, I found the experience OK, but poky. When I tried to use Eclipse Luna with JSDT for JavaScript development in 2014, it constantly displayed false-positive errors for valid code that passed JSHint.

  • A Complete List of The Best Data Science Programming Languages

    Data science is one of the fastest-growing fields in America. Organizations are employing data scientists at a rapid rate to help them analyze increasingly large and complex data volumes. The proliferation of big data and the need to make sense of it all has created a vortex where all of these things exist together. As a result, new techniques, technologies and theories are continually being developed to run advanced analysis, and they all require development and programming to ensure a path forward.

  • PyFilesystem is greater than or equal to Pathlib

    I was reading a post by Trey Hunner on why pathlib is great, where he makes the case that pathlib is a better choice than the standard library alternatives that preceded it. I wouldn't actually disagree with a word of it. He's entirely correct. You should probably be using pathlib were it fits.

Programming: Samba, newt-lola, Kano, Python and More

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Development
  • Samba 4.10 RC1 Released: Adds Offline Domain Backups, Now Defaults To Python 3

    Samba 4.10 release candidate 1 was announced today as the open-source SMB implementation with support for Windows Server and Active Directory domains.

    The Samba 4.10 release is bringing export/restore features for Group Policy Objects (GPO), pre-fork process model improvements, support for offline domain backups with the samba-tool domain backup command now supporting an offline option, support for group membership statistics within a domain, Python 3 is now considered the default Python implementation while Python 2 support is retained, JSON logging improvements, and other work.

  • newt-lola

    Bison and Flex (or any of the yacc/lex family members) are a quick way to generate reliable parsers and lexers for language development. It's easy to write a token recognizer in Flex and a grammar in Bison, and you can readily hook code up to the resulting parsing operation. However, neither Bison nor Flex are really designed for embedded systems where memory is limited and malloc is to be avoided.

    When starting Newt, I didn't hesitate to use them though; it's was nice to use well tested and debugged tools so that I could focus on other parts of the implementation.

    With the rest of Newt working well, I decided to go take another look at the cost of lexing and parsing to see if I could reduce their impact on the system.

  • Kano Scores a Disney Partnership, Announces a Star Wars Kit for Later This Year

    Kano creates killer little sets to teach kids how to code and beyond (like the awesome Harry Potter Coding Kit), and today the company is announcing a Disney partnership. The first product will be a Star Wars kit.

    While other info is scant at the time, Kano says the Star Wars kit will be out “in the second half of 2019.” Alex Klein, Kano’s CEO and co-founder, only teased other details, saying that “Collaborating with Disney is a blessing. We can combine connected, creative technologies with some of the most memorable stories ever told.”

  • GDA and GObject Introspection: Remember 1
  • No really, pathlib is great
  • Top Seven Apps Built With Python
  • Turn video into black and white with python
  • Happy Mu Year 2019!
  • Python 101: Episode #42 – Creating Executables with cx_Freeze

    In this screencast, we will learn how to turn your Python code into a Windows executable file using the cx_Freeze project.

  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #351 (Jan. 15, 2019)
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More in Tux Machines

Security: Nest Lockout, Moment of Truth for Cyber Insurance, DNS Hijacking Attacks and Australian Cracking

  • Nest is locking customers out of accounts until they fix their security

    Emails were sent last night to all users that may have been affected by recent [breaches], with a new password being mandatory, as it tries to avoid the "I'll do it later" attitude that means that often vulnerable passwords remain in use for months or years.

  • A Moment of Truth for Cyber Insurance

    Mondelez’s claim represents just a fraction of the billions of dollars in collateral damage caused by NotPetya, a destructive, indiscriminate cyberattack of unprecedented scale, widely suspected to have been launched by Russia with the aim of hurting Ukraine and its business partners. A compromised piece of Ukrainian accounting software allowed NotPetya to spread rapidly around the world, disrupting business operations and causing permanent damage to property of Mondelez and many others. According to reports, Zurich apparently rejected Mondelez’s claim on the grounds that NotPetya was an act of war and, therefore, excluded from coverage under its policy agreement. If the question of whether and how war risk exemptions apply is left to the courts to decide on a case-by-case basis, this creates a profound source of uncertainty for policyholders about the coverage they obtain.

  • A Deep Dive on the Recent Widespread DNS Hijacking Attacks

    The U.S. government — along with a number of leading security companies — recently warned about a series of highly complex and widespread attacks that allowed suspected Iranian hackers to siphon huge volumes of email passwords and other sensitive data from multiple governments and private companies. But to date, the specifics of exactly how that attack went down and who was hit have remained shrouded in secrecy.

    This post seeks to document the extent of those attacks, and traces the origins of this overwhelmingly successful cyber espionage campaign back to a cascading series of breaches at key Internet infrastructure providers.

  • With elections weeks away, someone “sophisticated” [cracked] Australia’s politicians

    With elections just three months away, Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison announced on February 18 that the networks of the three major national political parties had been breached by what Australian security officials described as a "sophisticated state actor."

  • Australia's major political parties [cracked] in 'sophisticated' attack ahead of election

    Sources are describing the level of sophistication as "unprecedented" but are unable to say yet which foreign government is behind the attack.

  • Parliament attackers appear to have used Web shells

    Attackers who infiltrated the Australian Parliament network and also the systems of the Liberal, National and Labor Parties appear to have used Web shells – scripts that can be uploaded to a Web server to enable remote administration of a machine.

Android Leftovers

How Linux testing has changed and what matters today

If you've ever wondered how your Linux computer stacks up against other Linux, Windows, and MacOS machines or searched for reviews of Linux-compatible hardware, you're probably familiar with Phoronix. Along with its website, which attracts more than 250 million visitors a year to its Linux reviews and news, the company also offers the Phoronix Test Suite, an open source hardware benchmarking tool, and OpenBenchmarking.org, where test result data is stored. According to Michael Larabel, who started Phoronix in 2004, the site "is frequently cited as being the leading source for those interested in computer hardware and Linux. It offers insights regarding the development of the Linux kernel, product reviews, interviews, and news regarding free and open source software." Read more

Programmes and Events: Outreachy, FOSDEM and LibreOffice Asia Conference

  • Outreachy Summer 2019 Applications Open With Expanded Eligibility
    But beginning this round, they are also opening the application process to "anyone who faces systemic bias or discrimination in the technology industry of their country is invited to apply." For evaluating the systemic bias or discrimination, an essay question was added to the application process about what discrimination they may have faced or otherwise think they could face in seeking employment. Also different beginning this round is only students (update: for non-student participants, this restriction does not apply) from the Northern Hemisphere can apply to this May to August round while the Southern Hemisphere round is being deemed the December to March round moving forward.
  • VkRunner at FOSDEM
    I attended FOSDEM again this year thanks to funding from Igalia. This time I gave a talk about VkRunner in the graphics dev room. It’s now available on Igalia’s YouTube channel below: I thought this might be a good opportunity to give a small status update of what has happened since my last blog post nearly a year ago.
  • First LibreOffice Asia Conference
    The First LibreOffice Asia Conference Will Be Held On May 25-26, 2019 In Nihonbashi, Tokyo, Japan This is the first ever LibreOffice conference covering Asia, a rapidly-growing area for free and open source software. The call for papers will be launched soon. Berlin, February 18, 2019 – After the huge success of the LibreOffice Conference Indonesia in 2018, members of the Asian communities have decided to raise the bar in 2019 with the first ever LibreOffice Asia Conference in Nihonbashi – the very center of Tokyo, Japan – on May 25-26. One of the main organizers, Naruhiko Ogasawara, a member of the Japanese LibreOffice community and The Document Foundation, can’t hide his excitement: “When we launched the LibreOffice Mini Conference Japan in 2013 as a local event, we knew little about communities in other parts of Asia. In recent years we have attended the LibreOffice Conference and other Asian events like OpenSUSE Asia, COSCUP etc. We have realized that many of our colleagues are active and that our community should learn a lot from them. We are proud to be able to hold the first Asia Conference with our colleagues to further strengthen that partnership.”