Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Development

OSS: OpenProject in OSI, FOSS Events, and Women in Technology/Computing

Filed under
Development
OSS
  • OpenProject Foundation Joins Open Source Initiative

    The Open Source Initiative® (OSI), the founding organization of the open source software movement, announced that the OpenProject Foundation has joined the global non-profit as an Affiliate Member. OpenProject joins a who's who of global open source projects and foundations in support of software freedom, including Drupal Association, Eclipse Foundation, Linux Foundation, Mozilla Foundation, Wordpress Foundation, Wikimedia, and many more. The OSI Affiliate Member Program allows any non-profit community, organization or institution—unequivocally independent groups with a clear commitment to open source—to join the OSI in support of its mission to educate about and advocate for the benefits of open source software and to build bridges among different constituencies in the open source community.

  • Randa Approaches

    Later this week, I’m leaving for Zurich, and from there I’ll take the train up to Randa (up, in the sense that I live at sea level, and Randa is the length of one million micro-SD cards laid end-to-end higher).

    In Randa, I’ll be working as a KDE developer, and as a Calamares developer, and learning about accessibility tooling. There’s about 60 hacking hours in that week. I’ll also be working as the cook, for one day. There’s about 12 cooking hours in a day, since feeding 30 people takes a lot of vegetable-chopping, bread-slicing, and dish-washing.

  • FOSScamp Syros 2017 – day 2

    The morning stated by taking the bus to Kini beach. After some to enjoy the water (which were still cold in the morning), we sat for talking about the local Debian community and how can we help it grow. The main topic was localization (l10n), but we soon started to check other options. I reminded them that l10n isn’t only translation and we also talked about dictionaries for spell checking, fonts and local software which might be relevant (e.g. hdate for the Jewish/Hebrew calendar or Jcal for the Jalali calendar). For example it seems that regular Latin fonts are missing two Albanian characters.

    We also talked about how to use Open Labs to better work together with two hats – member of the local FOSS community and also as members of various open source projects (not forgetting open content / data ones projects as well). So people can cooperate both on the local level, the international level or to mix (using the other’s project international resources). In short: connections, connections, connections.

  • GnuPG Financial Results for 2016
  • ‘Women Were in Fact Pioneers in Computing Work’

    When a white male Google employee was fired after the release of a memo in which he complained about efforts to increase gender or racial diversity because employment gaps in tech may be due in part to “biological differences” which are “universal across human culture”—woman like feelings more than ideas, that sort of thing—this is not indication that, as USA Today hyperventilated, “the hot button issue of gender bias in the workplace has just gone thermonuclear.” It did provide occasion for the airing of some old ideas involving sexism and scientism, presented as somehow new, because technology.

  • a new interview question

    Obviously if you discover a person that thinks that gender imbalance is just the way it is and that nothing can or should be done about it, or that women don't program well, or the like, then that's a great result: clear no-hire. This person is likely to make life unpleasant for their female colleagues, and your company just avoided the problem. High fives, interview team!

Programming: Qt Creator 4.4, Ecere SDK, LLVM Clang, Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" Installer, antergos 17.9 ISO and More

Filed under
Development
  • Qt Creator 4.4.0 released

    We are happy to announce the release of Qt Creator 4.4.0!

  • Qt Creator 4.4 Released With New Inline Warning/Errors, CMake Improvements

    The Qt Company has announced the immediate availability of the Qt Creator 4.4 integrated development environment focused on Qt/C++ development.

    Qt Creator 4.4 has new inline annotations when in the Clang code model, some C++ highlighting improvements, improvements when using the CMake build system in its recent server-mode, removal of Windows CE support, and a variety of other improvements to this cross-platform IDE.

  • Ecere SDK: A cross-platform toolkit for GUIs and graphics

    In the summer of 1997, I was an avid gamer of the golden classics of the real-time strategy (RTS) and immersive 3D/sandbox role-playing games that defined those genres. After wasting many hours gaming, I wanted to do something more constructive. I had dreams of building my own video games.

    The previous year, I had created a basic textured-mapping, software-rendering 3D engine for a tutorial series called the 3D Coding BlackHole. I was working on developing a clone of a popular RTS game—as a learning experience and a stepping stone to building a new game with potential contributors.

  • More Benchmarks Of AMD's Threadripper With LLVM Clang 6.0 SVN

    With AMD a few days ago having landed an updated scheduler model for Zen CPUs within LLVM, I ran some fresh compiler benchmarks to see how the performance compares.

    This weekend I ran tests of LLVM Clang 4.0, Clang 5.0, and Clang 6.0 SVN after the landing of the recent znver1 scheduler model update. Just some quick tests from the AMD Threadripper 1950X Linux system while a more formal compiler comparison is in the works.

  • Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" Installer Enters Alpha with Linux 4.12 Support

    Work on the next major version of the Debian GNU/Linux operating system is ongoing since early July, a couple of weeks after the Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" series arrived, and it now looks like it's already in Alpha stages of development.

  • ISO Refresh: antergos 17.9
  • Intel Preparing Sub-Group Support For Their ANV Vulkan Driver
  • RadeonSI Lands Primitive Binning Support For Vega

    With a goal of increasing performance, AMD developers have added support for primitive binning to the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver.

Programming: Linux Development, Vulkan 1.0.60, Vala 0.38 and More

Filed under
Development

Developers' News: AMDGPU, Neon, GNOME Builder, Firefox 57, Coreutils 8.28, and More

Filed under
Development
  • Work-In-Progress Porting Of GCN 1.0/1.1 UVD To AMDGPU DRM Driver

    With the experimental AMDGPU DRM driver's support for GCN 1.0 "Southern Islands" and GCN 1.1 "Sea Islands" graphics processors as an alternative to the default Radeon DRM driver, one of the disadvantages of that experimental kernel driver is losing out on UVD video decoding. But a port is in the works.

  • Great Web Browsing Coming Back to KDE with Falkon, New Packaging Formats Coming to KDE with Snap

    Today is a good day filled with possibility and potential. The browser formerly known as QupZilla has gained a better name Falkon and a better home, KDE. This bring quality web browsing back to native KDE software for the first time in some years. It’s a pleasingly slick experience using QtWebEngine and integrating with all the parts of Plasma you’d expect.

    At the same time we at KDE neon are moving to new packaging format Snaps, a container format which can be used on many Linux distros. Falkon is now built by KDE neon CI and is in the edge channel of the Snap archive.

  • Builder 3.26 Sightings

    We’re getting close to 3.26 and a number of features have landed. Let’s take a quick screenshot tour to see what you’re likely to see in 3.26.

  • All Hands On Deck – How you can use your skills to contribute to Firefox 57 success

    If you’ve been following Firefox development over the last year, you probably know that we’re hard at work on a major refactor of the browser, codenamed Quantum.

    It’s been a very exciting and challenging time with hundreds of engineers bringing to life new concepts and incorporating them into our engine – Gecko. Those refactors, which will culminate in the release of Firefox 57, touch the very foundation of our engine and require massive changes to it.

  • coreutils-8.28 released [stable]

    This is to announce coreutils-8.28, a stable release.
    See the NEWS below for more details.

    Thanks to everyone who has contributed!

  • Coreutils 8.28 Released With Many Fixes, Few New Features

    Coreutils 8.28 is now available as the collection of core components found on GNU/Linux systems from cp, mv, df, tail, and many other common commands to command-line users.

  •  

  • Return to old school programming

    When my brother and I were growing up, our parents brought home an Apple II personal computer. Actually ours was one of the first Apple "clones," a Franklin ACE 1000, but it ran all of the original Apple software. And more importantly, you could write your own programs with the included AppleSoft BASIC.

    My brother and I cracked open the computer guide that came with it, and slowly taught ourselves how to write programs in BASIC. My first attempts were fairly straightforward math quizzes and other simple programs. But as I gained more experience in BASIC, I was able to harness high resolution graphics mode and do all kinds of nifty things.

  • cron.weekly issue #96: LogDevice, qmail, redis, Linus, HAProxy, libraries, concert, restic & more

    There’s some old-skool Linux news in this one with qmail & some Apple history, even more open source venture rounds & some practical guides for monitoring & securing containers. Should keep you occupied for at least a morning coffee.

Debian: Indexing Debian's buildinfo, Latest Development Reports (LTS)

Filed under
Development
Debian
  • Indexing Debian's buildinfo

    Debian is currently collecting buildinfo but they are not very conveniently searchable. Eventually Chris Lamb's buildinfo.debian.net may solve this problem, but in the mean time, I decided to see how practical indexing the full set of buildinfo files is with sqlite.

  • My free software activities, August 2017

    This is my monthly Debian LTS report. This month I worked on a few major packages that took a long time instead of multiple smaller issues. Affected packages were Mercurial, libdbd-mysql-perl and Ruby.

  • F/LOSS activity, August 2017
  • My free software activities, August 2017

    This is my monthly Debian LTS report. This month I worked on a few major packages that took a long time instead of multiple smaller issues. Affected packages were Mercurial, libdbd-mysql-perl and Ruby.

Programming: Fastify, DevOps Buzzword, Python, LLVM, PHP and RcppAnnoy

Filed under
Development
  • Introducing Fastify, a Speedy Node.js Web Framework

    Why have we written yet another web framework for Node.js? I am committed to making the Node.js platform faster, more stable and more scalable. In 2016, myself and David Mark Clements started Pino, which was designed to be the fastest logger for Node.js, and it now has four active maintainers and an ecosystem of hundreds of modules.

    Fastify is a new web framework inspired by Hapi, Restify and Express. Fastify is built as a general-purpose web framework, but it shines when building extremely fast HTTP APIs that use JSON as the data format. These are extremely common in both web and mobile software architectures, so Fastify could improve the throughput of the majority of applications.

  • The evolution of DevOps [Ed: DevOps is just a buzzword]

    A few years ago, I wrote that DevOps is the movement that doesn't want to be defined.

  • Why Python is a crucial part of the DevOps toolchain

    DevOps is built for agility and handling change. In this year’s Skill Up survey, Packt found that Python is one of the primary languages used by DevOps engineers. In this article, Richard Gall explores why Python is such a popular part of the DevOps toolchain.

    DevOps is a way of thinking; it’s an approach, not a specific set of tools. And that’s all well and good – but it only gives you half the picture. If we overstate DevOps as a philosophy or a methodology, then it becomes too easy to forget that the toolchain is everything when it comes to DevOps. In fact, DevOps thinking forces you to think about your toolchain more than ever – when infrastructure becomes code, the way in which you manage it, change it is constantly.

  • Updated AMD Zen Scheduler Model Lands For LLVM 6.0

    With the soon-to-be-released LLVM 5.0 there is the initial AMD Zen scheduler model for the compiler to benefit Ryzen / EPYC processors. But now already hitting the LLVM development code for LLVM 6.0 is a revised scheduler model.

  • [Fedora/Red Hat] PHP version 7.0.23 and 7.1.9
  • RcppAnnoy 0.0.9

Oracle Passes More Projects (NetBeans) to Apache, Layoffs Coming

Filed under
Development
  • 1st code donation is complete

    Hi all, The 1st NetBeans code donation from Oracle to Apache is complete and http://bits.netbeans.org/download/apache-donation/ApacheNetBeansDonation1.zip is the first code drop. Everyone is welcome to look at the code, which will be imported into the Apache NetBeans repository. The 1st code donation, i.e., the NetBeans Platform + the Java SE tooling, which includes the new Jigsaw and JShell features, comprises around 45,000 files (around 4 million lines of code) to be transferred from Oracle to Apache. Hereby we are at step 5 of the process outlined below. Mentors, can you create the official Apache NetBeans repository so that we can import the code into it. Many thanks, Geertjan

  • The Sounds Of More Oracle Layoffs, SPARC Execution Could Be Near

    America this weekend by reportedly doing a fresh round of layoffs and it's sounding like it could affect a number of heads.

    Thelayoff.com/Oracle is once again a vibrant discussion board today with word that massive layoffs are set for Friday, 1 September, and sound squarely aimed at their hardware division, SPARC. There are many reported Oracle employees stating notification of a FedEx shipment tomorrow from Oracle headquarters, widely expected to be their termination papers, etc.

Programming: XOD, PHP 7.2 Release Candidate, Coding Freely, GStreamer Rust Bindings

Filed under
Development
  • XOD: A New Open Source Visual Programming Language

    To start let’s quickly go over some of the basic fundamentals of what exactly the XOD programming language is before we get into it more in depth. In short, it is a visual programming language that use nodes to allow you to build programs. A node would be any type of blocks that are some sort of a physical operating device (sensor, relay, motor are all types of nodes). So pretty much a node is anything that is a physical representation of many smaller levels of software/hardware working together to create an end, physical object.

  • PHP on the road to the 7.2.0 release

    Version 7.2.0RC1 is released. It's now enter the stabilisation phase for the developpers, and the test phase for the users.

  • PHP 7.2.0 Release Candidate 1 Released

    The PHP development team announces the immediate availability of PHP 7.2.0 Release Candidate 1. This release is the first Release Candidate for 7.2.0. All users of PHP are encouraged to test this version carefully, and report any bugs and incompatibilities in the bug tracking system.

  • PHP 7.2 Release Candidate Arrives

    PHP 7.2 has matured past the alpha and beta stages and is now out with its first release candidate.

    PHP 7.2 is being fitted with the new libsodium extension for better cryptography, a number of bug fixes, updated SQLite, improved error messages, DOM enhancements, and many other changes as outlined in the NEWS file.

  • 3 consequences of coding in the open

    I'd never rule out going back to anything closed source (not that I plan on leaving Reaction!), but working full-time in open source has opened my eyes to a whole new side of things that I've truly enjoyed. Absolute transparency has made me a better planner and developer. Having to express my ideas to the world before, during, and after implementing them changes the way I do things. The 24/7 availability is both engrossing and also overwhelming. And finally, working with not just the core team, but our GitHub community, pushes me to make decisions together and grow as a developer.

  • GStreamer Rust bindings release 0.8.0

    As written in the previous blog post, I’m working on nice Rust bindings for GStreamer. Now it’s finally time for the first release, 0.8.0.

    First of all, I should thank Arturo Castro a lot. He worked on the previous GStreamer bindings (versions < 0.8.0), which were all manually written instead of mostly autogenerated like the new ones. As such, the API is now completely different but the old bindings can still be found here.

LLVM 5.0 Release Candidate 4

Filed under
Development
  • [llvm-dev] [5.0.0 Release] Release Candidate 4 tagged
  • LLVM 5.0 Release Should Be Imminent

    LLVM 5.0 was supposed to be officially released last week, but instead another release candidate was warranted while the stable debut is expected in the days ahead.

    LLVM release manager Hans Wennborg opted for a 5.0-RC4 release on Tuesday due to a few more changes trickling in as they try to clear their blocker bug list for this six-month update to the LLVM compiler infrastructure.

  • [Old] Why We Argue: Style

     

    Code is read many more times than it is written, which means that the ultimate cost of code is in its reading. It therefore follows that code should be optimized for readability, which in turn dictates that an application's code should all follow the same style. Adhering to a common style saves you money.

Go, 'First' Programming Languages, and "Flang" Compiler

Filed under
Development
  • My use-case for Go

    After using a few very good applications written in Go (Syncthing, Docker and Hugo are some examples) I wanted to get to learn a bit more about the language.

    I'm very interested in programming languages theory and how it could give developers the tools they need to write software in the best possible way and with as many guarantees as possible on the correctness of the resulting applications.

    To get an idea of where programming languages theory is headed have a look at the post Graydon Hoare (the creator of Rust and now one of Swift's developers) published discussing possible new research directions for programming languages.

  • What was your first programming language?

    Whether you first learned to program in a classroom setting, on the job, or by teaching yourself, everyone who has contributed code to an open source project has a story of how they first picked up programming. And no matter if you still use it today, your first language played an important role in shaping your understanding of computer systems.

  • NVIDIA & Co Continue Working On LLVM Fortran "Flang" Compiler

    Since earlier this year NVIDIA posted their work on "Flang", an LLVM-based Fortran compiler, to GitHub while now they have done a formal announcement and update about its status.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • [LabPlot] Improved data fitting in 2.5
    Until now, the fit parameters could in principle take any values allowed by the fit model, which would lead to a reasonable description of the data. However, sometimes the realistic regions for the parameters are known in advance and it is desirable to set some mathematical constrains on them. LabPlot provides now the possibility to define lower and/or upper bounds for the fit parameters and to limit the internal fit algorithm to these regions only.
  • [GNOME] Maps Towards 3.28
    Some work has been done since the release of 3.26 in September. On the visual side we have adapted the routing sidebar to use a similar styling as is used in Files (Nautilus) and the GTK+ filechooser.
  • MX 17 Beta 2
  • MiniDebconf in Toulouse
    I attended the MiniDebconf in Toulouse, which was hosted in the larger Capitole du Libre, a free software event with talks, presentation of associations, and a keysigning party. I didn't expect the event to be that big, and I was very impressed by its organization. Cheers to all the volunteers, it has been an amazing week-end!
  • DebConf Videoteam sprint report - day 0
    First day of the videoteam autumn sprint! Well, I say first day, but in reality it's more day 0. Even though most of us have arrived in Cambridge already, we are still missing a few people. Last year we decided to sprint in Paris because most of our video gear is stocked there. This year, we instead chose to sprint a few days before the Cambridge Mini-Debconf to help record the conference afterwards.
  • Libre Computer Board Launches Another Allwinner/Mali ARM SBC
    The Tritium is a new ARM single board computer from the Libre Computer Board project. Earlier this year the first Libre Computer Board launched as the Le Potato for trying to be a libre and free software minded ARM SBC. That board offered better specs than the Raspberry Pi 3 and aimed to be "open" though not fully due to the ARM Mali graphics not being open.
  • FOSDEM 2018 Will Be Hosting A Wayland / Mesa / Mir / X.Org Developer Room
    This year at the FOSDEM open-source/Linux event in Brussels there wasn't the usual "X.Org dev room" as it's long been referred to, but for 2018, Luc Verhaegen is stepping back up to the plate and organizing this mini graphics/X.Org developer event within FOSDEM.
  • The Social Network™ releases its data networking code
    Facebook has sent another shiver running up Cisco's spine, by releasing the code it uses for packet routing. Open/R, its now-open source routing platform, runs Facebook's backbone and data centre networks. The Social Network™ first promised to release the platform in May 2017. In the post that announced the release, Facebook said it began developing Open/R for its Terragraph wireless system, but since applied it to its global fibre network, adding: “we are even starting to roll it out into our data center fabrics, running inside FBOSS and on our Open Compute Project networking hardware like Wedge 100.”
  • Intel Icelake Support Added To LLVM Clang
    Initial support for Intel's Icelake microarchitecture that's a follow-on to Cannonlake has been added to the LLVM/Clang compiler stack. Last week came the Icelake patch to GCC and now Clang has landed its initial Icelake enablement too.
  • Microsoft's Surface Book 2 has a power problem
     

    Microsoft’s Surface Book 2 has a power problem. When operating at peak performance, it may draw more power than its stock charger or Surface Dock can handle. What we’ve discovered after talking to Microsoft is that it’s not a bug—it’s a feature.

Kernel: Linux 4.15 and Intel

  • The Big Changes So Far For The Linux 4.15 Kernel - Half Million New Lines Of Code So Far
    We are now through week one of two for the merge window of the Linux 4.15 kernel. If you are behind on your Phoronix reading with the many feature recaps provided this week of the different pull requests, here's a quick recap of the changes so far to be found with Linux 4.15:
  • Intel 2017Q3 Graphics Stack Recipe Released
    Intel's Open-Source Technology Center has put out their quarterly Linux graphics driver stack upgrade in what they are calling the latest recipe. As is the case with the open-source graphics drivers just being one centralized, universal component to be easily installed everywhere, their graphics stack recipe is just the picked versions of all the source components making up their driver.
  • Intel Ironlake Receives Patches For RC6 Power Savings
    Intel Ironlake "Gen 5" graphics have been around for seven years now since being found in Clarkdale and Arrandale processors while finally now the patches are all worked out for enabling RC6 power-savings support under Linux.

Red Hat: OpenStack and Financial News

Security: Google and Morgan Marquis-Boire

  • Google: 25 per cent of black market passwords can access accounts

    The researchers used Google's proprietary data to see whether or not stolen passwords could be used to gain access to user accounts, and found that an estimated 25 per cent of the stolen credentials can successfully be used by cyber crooks to gain access to functioning Google accounts.

  • Data breaches, phishing, or malware? Understanding the risks of stolen credentials

    Drawing upon Google as a case study, we find 7--25\% of exposed passwords match a victim's Google account.

  • Infosec star accused of sexual assault booted from professional affiliations
    A well-known computer security researcher, Morgan Marquis-Boire, has been publicly accused of sexual assault. On Sunday, The Verge published a report saying that it had spoken with 10 women across North America and Marquis-Boire's home country of New Zealand who say that they were assaulted by him in episodes going back years. A woman that The Verge gave the pseudonym "Lila," provided The Verge with "both a chat log and a PGP signed and encrypted e-mail from Morgan Marquis-Boire. In the e-mail, he apologizes at great length for a terrible but unspecified wrong. And in the chat log, he explicitly confesses to raping and beating her in the hotel room in Toronto, and also confesses to raping multiple women in New Zealand and Australia."