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Development

Programming: GCC and LLVM Updates, new tint

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Development
GNU
BSD
  • New Qualcomm Saphira Server CPU Added To GCC

    Details are very scarce on the new Qualcomm "Saphira" processor, but initial support for it was added this week to the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC).

    Qualcomm Saphira isn't turning up much in search engines besides some trademark applications and the likes, but this new CPU is seeing quick support in GCC, perhaps due to GCC 8 feature development ending soon.

  • 5.0.1-rc1 has been tagged

    5.0.1-rc1 has been tagged, testers can begin testing and uploading binaries. If you run into any issues, please file bugs at bugs.llvm.org. There are still 2 weeks left until the 5.0.1 merge deadline, so there is still time to get fixes in.

  • LLVM 5.0.1 Is Coming In The Next Few Weeks

    Tom Stellard of Red Hat will once again be taking up duties as point release manager for LLVM.

    Tom has now tagged a 5.0.1-rc1 release for testers to begin trying out this first bug-fix update to LLVM 5.0, which itself was released in early September.

  • tint 0.0.4: Small enhancements

    A maintenance release of the tint package arrived on CRAN earlier today. Its name expands from tint is not tufte as the package offers a fresher take on the Tufte-style for html and pdf presentations.

Go Up, Many Programming Languages Go Down

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Development
  • Why Go is skyrocketing in popularity

    The Go programming language, sometimes referred to as Google's golang, is making strong gains in popularity. While languages such as Java and C continue to dominate programming, new models have emerged that are better suited to modern computing, particularly in the cloud. Go's increasing use is due, in part, to the fact that it is a lightweight, open source language suited for today's microservices architectures. Container darling Docker and Google's container orchestration product Kubernetes are built using Go. Go is also gaining ground in data science, with strengths that data scientists are looking for in overall performance and the ability to go from "the analyst's laptop to full production."

    As an engineered language (rather than something that evolved over time), Go benefits developers in multiple ways, including garbage collection, native concurrency, and many other native capabilities that reduce the need for developers to write code to handle memory leaks or networked apps. Go also provides many other features that fit well with microservices architectures and data science.

  • 15 Most Disliked Programming Languages That Developers Don’t Want To Work With

    It’s a well-known fact that your choice of a programming language decides the growth of your career as a developer. For example, if you’re an Android developer, you must start learning Kotlin programming and join the army of developers who are ready to walk with the changing trend. The same could be said for iOS developers who are learning Swift.

    But, what if you are a programming novice and looking for a new language? In this scenario, it’s advisable to start with easy-to-learn programming languages like Python or JavaScript. To help you out in this decision and give you a good idea of the languages which are disliked by the programmers, Stack Overflow has published a blog post.

GitLab Changes its Contributor Licensing to Better Serve Open-Source Projects

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Development
Legal
  • GitLab Changes its Contributor Licensing to Better Serve Open-Source Projects

    Self-hosted Git repository management tool GitLab today announced that it is abandoning its Contributor Licensing Agreement (CLA) and adopting a Developer Certificate of Origin (DCO) and license.

    According to the company, which claims 67% market share in the self-hosted Git market, "the DCO gives developers greater flexibility and portability for their contributions."

  • GitLab Transitions Contributor Licensing to Developer Certificate of Origin to Better Support Open Source Projects; Empower Contributors

    GitLab, a software product used by 2/3 of all enterprises, today announced it was abandoning the industry-standard Contributor License Agreement (CLA) in favor of a Developer Certificate of Origin (DCO) and license. The DCO gives developers greater flexibility and portability for their contributions. The move has already attracted the attention of large open source projects who recognize the benefits. Debian and GNOME both plan to migrate their communities and open source projects to GitLab.

    GitLab's move away from a CLA is meant to modernize its code hosting and collaborative development infrastructure for all open source projects. Additionally, requiring a CLA became problematic for developers who didn't want to enter into legal terms; they weren't reviewing the CLA contract and they effectively gave up their rights to own and contribute to open source code.

Programming: Node.js 8 and Open Source Sparse Tensors

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Development
  • NEWS: Node.js 8 Moves into Long-Term Support and Node.js 9 Becomes the New Current Release Line

    We are super excited to announce that later today Node.js 8 will be ready for production as it transfers into the de facto Long-Term Support release line opening it up to a larger user base that demands stability and security (Node.js 8.9.0 is the first official Node.js 8 release to hit LTS status). Node.js 8 is one of the biggest release lines from the Node.js community to date with features and add-ons like Async / Await and V8 JavaScript Engine 6.1. It is up to 20 percent faster than its predecessor Node.js 6 (source nearForm) in typical web applications. An early tester found that Node.js 8 cut its web response by 70 percent:

  • Open Source Sparse Tensor Computation Is Fast

    Tensors are data tables in n dimensions and when they occur they are often sparse, i.e. most of the entries are zero. In the past we have hand-crafted code to work efficiently with sparse tensors, but now we have Taco, an open source compiler that can automatically generate code that can run up to 100 times faster.

Programming: pinp, GNSS, JavaScript, Security Updates

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Development
  • pinp 0.0.3: More docs, more features

    Our pinp package for snazzier one or two column vignette received it second update. Now at version 0.0.3, it arrived on CRAN on Saturday with minimal fuzz as an 'CRAN-pretest-publish' transition.

  • Google lets Android devs see nanosecond-level GNSS data

    Created for phone designers, The Chocolate Factory has decided the raw GNSS data is also valuable to researchers, writing that the data “allows you to see the behavior of the GNSS receiver in great detail, including receiver clock offset and drift to the order of 1 nanosecond and 1 ppb [part per billion – El Reg] and measurement errors on a satellite-by-satellite basis.

  • ES8, the Javascript standard of 2017

    Surely you will know that since 2015 it was agreed to update the Javascript standard every year in order to keep JS up to date in a smooth way. The changes of last year were very decaffeinated, but this year we have some juicier news.

  • Security updates for Tuesday

Programming: uClibc, GCC, Fresh

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Development
  • uClibc Is Still Around As A Lightweight C Standard Library

    The uClibc project is still advancing as a lightweight, performant C standard library even while glibc has been making performance advancements and other improvements as well.

    Alexey Brodkin of Synopsys spoke at this week's Embedded Linux Conference Europe about how uClibc is still relevant today and "makes sense" for organizations like Synopsys.

  • GCC Prepares For C17 Language Support

    Not to be confused with C++17 that brings many notable additions and improvements, C17 is also coming soon as an update to the C programming language.

    The C17 programming language update is just a "bug fix version" to the C11 standard. C17 will soon go to ballot for voting and still might end up being known as C18, but for now the GNU Compiler Collection is getting prepped with patches as C17.

  • News: The new released Fresh IDE .

    The reputable IDE for FASM named Fresh comes on 29.10.2017 06:47:22 with new news.

Programming: Android 8.1 Developer, Z Garbage Collector, GNU C Library

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Development
  • Android 8.1 Developer Preview hands-on: Everything new in Google’s latest update

    Google gave us 64 days to get used to Android 8.0 Oreo being the latest version of Android. While only one third-party phone has upgraded to the latest version, Google is already dropping a developer preview for the next version of Android on the world. Two days ago it released the Android 8.1 Developer Preview, and after a solid day of trying to flash it, totally bricking a Pixel 2, and later having Google pull the update files because they didn't work, we're here to report what Android 8.1 is actually like.

    Like most of the .1 releases these days, it's full of some minor, but important, updates that probably just weren't ready in time for Android 8.0.

  • ZGC large-heap Java garbage collector may go open source

    An Oracle-developed, low-latency Java garbage collector geared to large heaps could move to the open source community, if a proposal to do so gets community approval. Votes are due by November 8.

    Called the Z Garbage Collector (ZGC), the project is designed to support multiterabyte heaps, have pause times not exceeding 10 milliseconds, and offer no more than a 15 percent application reduction throughput compared to the G1 garbage collector.

  • Point releases for the GNU C Library

    The GNU C Library (glibc) project produces regular releases on an approximately six-month cadence. The current release is 2.26 from early August; the 2.27 release is expected at the beginning of February 2018. Unlike many other projects, though, glibc does not normally create point releases for important fixes between the major releases. The last point release from glibc was 2.14.1, which came out in 2011. A discussion on the need for a 2.26 point release led to questions about whether such releases have a useful place in the current software-development environment.

    The glibc 2.26 release is generally only found in relatively fast-moving distributions at this point. For most users, 2.26 has been without problems, but that is not true for everybody. There have been a few significant regressions in this release that have required fixes; one of those was seen as important enough that the question of creating a 2.26.1 point release was raised. Romain Naour subsequently brought that discussion to the libc-alpha mailing list. Having a point release containing important fixes would be helpful to downstream distributors that want to incorporate those fixes, he said.

Programming: TLS, Systers, RockScript, London Perl Workshop

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Development
  • Mauritian code-cutters to help deliver TLS 1.3

    When IETF 100's hackathon kicks off in Singapore, one of the groups hoping to make waves will come from Mauritius.

    Their aim, Logan Velvindron of hackers.mu told Vulture South, is twofold: to make serious contributions to the development of the as-yet-immature TLS 1.3, and along the way, break Mauritius out of its public image as a tourist destination with nothing to contribute to today's IT.

  • Scout out code problems with SonarQube

    More and more organizations are implementing DevOps to make it faster to get quality code into the production environment after passing through the intermediate development and testing environments. Although things such as version control, continuous integration and deployment, and automated testing all fall under the scope of DevOps, one critical question remains: How can an organization quantify code quality, not just deployment speed?

  • Systers: Helping women find their potential in code

    Systers is the world's largest email community of women in technical computing roles, with more than 7,500 members from more than 65 countries. Systers was founded in 1987 by Anita Borg as the first online community for women in computing, and it hosts 23 different affinity groups where women technologists can connect with and offer support to members of their self-identified cultures.

  • RockScript: An Open Source Scripting Language and Engine for Microservice Orchestration

    Tom Baeyens has released a preview of RockScript, an open source scripting language and engine for integrating and orchestrating microservices in the style of Event-Driven Architecture (EDA). RockScript uses a language that looks much like JavaScript, which when executed by the accompanying engine allows the coordination of transactional activities within microservice systems in a similar fashion to Business Process Execution Language (BPEL) and Business Process Modelling (BPM).

  • London Perl Workshop

     

     
        WHEN: 25th November 2017 at 9:00AM
        WHERE: 115 New Cavendish Street London W1W 6UW (map)
     

  • How to rethink project management for DevOps

Events: Chrome Dev Summit, GSoC Mentor Summit, Google Code-in, Samsung's 'Open Source Conference’, Raleigh's ATO

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Development
OSS
  • Chrome Dev Summit 2017

    I attended the 5th Chrome Dev Summit this week. The talks were all recorded and are available via the schedule (the keynote and leadership panel on day 1 are perhaps of broadest interest and highest bang-for-buck viewing value). It was a high quality, well-produced event with an intimate feel – I was very surprised when Robert Nyman told me it was over 700 people! I appreciated the good vegetarian food options and noticed and was very impressed by the much-better-than-typical-tech-conferences gender representation and code of conduct visibility.

  • The 2017 GSoC Mentor Summit

    I am wrapping up the ideas after the Google mentor summit 2017. In spite of having mentored my first GSoC student in 2008, this is the first time I ever attended this summit. There were ~300 mentors representative of many different open source communities. A triple-concentrate of all the main open projects in a not-too-noisy environment (unlike e.g. FOSDEM) – all in all, it has been a very pleasant experience!

  • Google Code-in 2017 open source mentor organizations revealed, including Ubuntu!

    Google does a great job supporting the open source community, which is appropriate, as the company leverages the code too. The search giant gives back to the community through programs such as "Google Code-in." If you aren't familiar, it is an educational contest which teaches children about open source by having them working on an actual established project. Today, the Android-maker reveals the mentors that will be participating in Google Code-in 2017.

  • Samsung Electronics Kicks Off ‘2017 Open Source Conference’

    Samsung Electronics will hold 'Samsung OpenSource Conference' at Samsung Electronics Seoul R & D campus in Ueon-dong, Seoul from October 25 to 26.

    The Samsung Open Source Conference, which has been held every year since 2014, is the largest open source conference in Korea with over 1,000 developers participating in the program every year.

  • Is Raleigh the East Coast's Silicon Valley?

    They are also awed by the conference itself. This year well over 3,000 people shelled out somewhere around a couple of hundred bucks each to attend the two-day event, which took place earlier this week and utilized more than 20 meeting rooms at the Raleigh Convention Center to house over 200 sessions.

Programming: Comments, SciPy 1.0, and Android 8.1 O Developer Preview

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Development
  • How much do you comment your source code?

    While it may be true that the best code is self-documenting, even the clearest written source code requires adequate documentation in order to be quickly parsed and understood by human readers.

  • SciPy 1.0 released

    The SciPy project has announced the release of SciPy 1.0. The "Python-based ecosystem of open-source software for mathematics, science, and engineering" has been around for 16 years since version 0.1 and, in reality, the 1.0 designation is overdue. "Some key project goals, both technical (e.g. Windows wheels and continuous integration) and organisational (a governance structure, code of conduct and a roadmap), have been achieved recently. Many of us are a bit perfectionist, and therefore are reluctant to call something '1.0' because it may imply that it's 'finished' or 'we are 100% happy with it'. This is normal for many open source projects, however that doesn't make it right. We acknowledge to ourselves that it's not perfect, and there are some dusty corners left (that will probably always be the case). Despite that, SciPy is extremely useful to its users, on average has high quality code and documentation, and gives the stability and backwards compatibility guarantees that a 1.0 label imply." Beyond the Windows wheels (a binary distribution format) mentioned above, there are some other new features in the release: continuous-integration coverage for macOS and Windows, a set of new ordinary differential equation solvers and a unified interface to them, two new trust region optimizers and a new linear programming method, many new BLAS and LAPACK functions were wrapped, and more.

  • Google launches the Android 8.1 Developer Preview
  • Android 8.1 O Developer Preview And Android Studio 3 With Kotlin Support Released: Download Here
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Librem 5 Phone Progress Report

  • Librem 5 Phone Progress Report – The First of Many More to Come!
    First, let me apologize for the silence. It was not because we went into hibernation for the winter, but because we were so busy in the initial preparation and planning of a totally new product while orienting an entirely new development team. Since we are more settled into place now, we want to change this pattern of silence and provide regular updates. Purism will be giving weekly news update posts every Tuesday, rotating between progress on phone development from a technology viewpoint (the hardware, kernel, OS, etc.) and an art of design viewpoint (UI/UX from GNOME/GTK to KDE/Plasma). To kickoff this new update process, this post will discus the technological progress of the Librem 5 since November of 2017.
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Benchmarking Retpoline-Enabled GCC 8 With -mindirect-branch=thunk

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An introduction to Inkscape for absolute beginners

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Behind the scenes with Pop!_OS Linux

In October, Linux PC maker System76 released its homegrown version of Linux, Pop!_OS, giving users the choice between its legacy Ubuntu operating system or the new Pop!_OS flavor of Linux. Recently Opensource.com gave away a System76 laptop with Pop!_OS installed, which made me curious about the company and this new version of Linux, so I spoke with Cassidy James Blaede, Pop!_OS's user experience (UX) designer. Blaede joined System76 in 2014, fresh out of college at the University of Northern Iowa and marriage to his wife, Katie. While in college, he co-founded the elementary OS project and interned at UX consultancy Visual Logic, both of which influenced his work for System76. He started at System76 as a front-end developer and was later promoted to UX architect. Read more