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Programming/Development: 'DevOps', NumPy, Google SLING

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Development
  • 5 DevOps leadership priorities in 2018

    This week, DevOps professionals gathered in San Francisco to talk about the state of DevOps in the enterprise. At 1,400 attendees, the sold-out DevOps Enterprise Summit has doubled in size since 2014 – a testament to the growth of the DevOps movement itself.

    With an ear to this event and an eye on the explosion of tweets coming out of it, here are five key priorities we think IT leaders should be aware of as they take their DevOps efforts into the new year.

  • NumPy Plan for dropping Python 2.7 support

    The Python core team plans to stop supporting Python 2 in 2020. The NumPy project has supported both Python 2 and Python 3 in parallel since 2010, and has found that supporting Python 2 is an increasing burden on our limited resources; thus, we plan to eventually drop Python 2 support as well. Now that we're entering the final years of community-supported Python 2, the NumPy project wants to clarify our plans, with the goal of to helping our downstream ecosystem make plans and accomplish the transition with as little disruption as possible.

  • Google SLING: An Open Source Natural Language Parser

    Google Research has just released an open source project that might be of interest if you are into natural language processing. SLING is a combination of recurrent neural networks and frame based parsing.

    Natural language parsing is an important topic. You can get meaning from structure and parsing is how you get structure. It is important in processing both text and voice. If you have any hope that Siri, Cortana or Alexa are going to get any better then you need to have better natural language understanding - not just the slot and filler systems currently in use.

Development of Linux 4.15

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Development
Linux
  • Broadcom Hurricane 2 & Allwinner R40 Supported By Linux 4.15

    More ARM platform upstreaming has taken place for the Linux 4.15 kernel development cycle among other ARM hardware improvements.

  • Intel Coffee Lake & Cannonlake Thermal Support In Linux 4.15

    While Intel Coffee Lake hardware is shipping already, a few bits of tardy kernel code for these "8th Gen Core" CPUs is only hitting the Linux 4.15 kernel. The Intel DRM driver is most notably enabling Coffee Lake graphics by default in 4.15, but there's also some thermal code now landing among other changes now happening.

    Zhang Rui sent in the thermal updates for Linux 4.15 on Thursday and they include late additions for Coffee Lake but at the same time the relevant additions for Cannonlake that will be shipping in 2018 as the next-gen Intel CPUs.

  • AMDGPU DC Pull Request Submitted For Linux 4.15 Kernel - 132,395 Lines Of Code

    One day after submitting the main DRM feature pull request for Linux 4.15, David Airlie of Red Hat has submitted the secondary pull request that would feature the long-awaited introduction of AMDGPU DC into the mainline kernel.

Linux 4.15 Development Updates

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Development
Linux

Programming: Embedded OpenJDK, Kanban Board and More

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Development
  • Azul Systems Affirms Commitment to Open Source Embedded Java

    Azul will Provide Continued Support for Embedded builds of OpenJDK on x86, Arm and PowerPC Processors

  • How to create better documentation with a kanban board

    If you're working on documentation, a website, or other user-facing content, it's helpful to know what users expect to find—both the information they want and how the information is organized and structured. After all, great content isn't very useful if people can't find what they're looking for.

    Card sorting is a simple and effective way to gather input from users about what they expect from menu interfaces and pages. The simplest implementation is to label a stack of index cards with the sections you plan to include in your website or documentation and ask users to sort the cards in the way they would look for the information. Variations include letting people write their own menu headers or content elements.

  • Uber Open-Sources Its AI Programming Language, Encourages Autonomous Car Development

    Uber's self-driving car ambitions have been an open secret surrounding the company for some time now. If the ride share company's ambitions are met, someday when you hail a ride using its app it'll be an autonomous car that shows instead of a human looking to supplement his income. The company has been actively recruiting engineering talent toward its autonomous car program – even running into some legal trouble with Google along the way over accusations of poaching talent and technology.

  • 25 Pitfalls When Learning to Program
  • DevOps: How to avoid project death by hand-off

    There's a notion in DevOps that our work begins when we understand the strategic business goals that we're trying to meet, then we deliver on them. This is typically a two-step process where one team creates goals, then hands them off to another team to implement them.

Happy 60th birthday, Fortran

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Development

The Fortran compiler, introduced in April 1957, was the first optimizing compiler, and it paved the way for many technical computing applications over the years. What Cobol did for business computing, Fortran did for scientific computing.

Fortran may be approaching retirement age, but that doesn't mean it's about to stop working. This year marks the 60th anniversary of the first Fortran (then styled "FORTRAN," for "FORmula TRANslation") release.

Even if you can't write a single line of it, you use Fortran every day: Operational weather forecast models are still largely written in Fortran, for example. Its focus on mathematical performance makes Fortran a common language in many high-performance computing applications, including computational fluid dynamics and computational chemistry. Although Fortran may not have the same popular appeal as newer languages, those languages owe much to the pioneering work of the Fortran development team.

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Collabora's Role in Linux Development

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Development
Linux
  • Nine Collabora Developers Have Contributed 46 Patches to the Linux 4.14 Kernel

    Collabora's Mark Filion informs Softpedia today on the contributions made by the Collabora developers to the recently released Linux 4.14 kernel series.

    Linux kernel 4.14 is the newest long-term supported (LTS) kernel series, bringing exciting new features like support for AMD Secure Memory Encryption, bigger memory limits, Heterogeneous Memory Management to support upcoming GPUs, faster TBL flushing, asynchronous non-blocking buffered reads, and much more.

  • Collabora & Linux Kernel 4.14

    Linus Torvalds has released Linux 4.14, so it's time to take a look at the Collaborans' contributions to this release. On total, we had 9 developers who authored 46 patches all around the kernel. In addition, 7 Collaborans contributed their time to review and test 40 patches. Finally, over a hundred patches found their way to Linus tree via our team, who provided over 108 non-author sign-offs during this development cycle.

    Taking a deeper look at the contributions, Sebastian Reichel continued on his role as the Power Supply maintainer. Aside from several improvements for the da9052 PMIC driver, he added a driver for PWM controllable vibrators, which will be used by the Motorola Droid 4. Romain Perier, who recently left Collabora, touched several users of the PCI DMA Pool wrappers, which is currently deprecated, and updated them to use the DMA Pool API directly, making it one step closer to complete his proposal to remove the pci_poll_*() macros.

Programming: Practical Functional Programming,Goodbye to C

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Development
  • Practical Functional Programming

    40 years ago, on October 17th, 1977, the Turing Award was presented to John Backus for his contribution to the design of high-level programming systems, most notably the Fortran programming language. All Turing Award winners are given the opportunity to present a lecture on a topic of their choice during the year in which they receive the award. As the creator of the Fortran programming language, one may have expected Backus to lecture on the benefits of Fortran and future developments in the language. Instead, he gave a lecture entitled Can programming be liberated from the Von Neumann style? in which he criticized some of the mainstream languages of the day, including Fortran, for their shortcomings. He also proposed an alternative: a functional style of programming.

  • The long goodbye to C

    I was thinking a couple of days ago about the new wave of systems languages now challenging C for its place at the top of the systems-programming heap – Go and Rust, in particular. I reached a startling realization – I have 35 years of experience in C. I write C code pretty much every week, but I can no longer remember when I last started a new project in C!

  • Ten interesting features from various modern languages
  • 7 Open-Source Test Automation Frameworks

    As we enter the last quarter of 2017, TestProject’s team decided to round up the best open-source test automation frameworks out there, to help you choose the right one for you!

    Here are the pros and cons of 7 different open-source test automation frameworks.

Programming and Hardware: Atom 1.22, BSD, GCC, RISC-V, ROCm

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Development
  • Atom 1.22

    Users who work with large projects will be happy to see we resolved a long-standing performance issue related to spawning Git processes to fetch Git status. This manifested in periodic pauses of Atom’s UI and we’ve seen a noticeably smoother experience.

    The autocomplete-plus default provider now computes suggestions natively and on a separate thread. This means no memory overhead and no threat to Atom’s responsiveness. Read more in our in-depth blog post on Atom’s new concurrency-friendly buffer implementation.

  • Atom 1.22 Hackable Text Editor Introduces Performance and Usability Improvements

    GitHub updated their open-source and cross-platform Atom hackable text editor to version 1.22, a monthly bugfix release that promises to add an extra layer of performance and usability improvements.

    Atom 1.22 is here to address a long-standing performance issue for those who work with large projects. The issue was related to the spawning of Git processes that fetch the Git status, and it would apparently occur at times.

  • The first AF3e preorders

    This morning, Google alerted me to a reputable site mentioning “Absolute FreeBSD, 3rd Edition.”

  • Paul Irofti (pirofti@) on hotplugd(8), math ports, xhci(4) and  other kernel advancements
  • Cannonlake Onboarding Posted For GCC Compiler

    An Intel developer is looking to merge the -march=cannonlake support for the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC).

  • Codasip and Avery Partner to Improve Regression Test Methodology of RISC-V Processors

    Codasip, the leading supplier of RISC-V® embedded CPU cores, today announced its partnership with Avery Design Systems, the provider of cutting-edge verification intellectual property (VIP) solutions for SoC and IP companies.

  • Exploring AMD’s Ambitious ROCm Initiative

    The ROCm developers wanted a platform that supports a number of different programming languages and is flexible enough to interface with different GPU-based hardware environments (Figure 1). As you will learn later in this article, ROCm provides direct support for OpenCL, Python, and several common C++ variants. One of the most innovative features of the platform is the Heterogeneous-Compute Interface for Portability (HIP) tool, which offers a vendor-neutral dialect of C++ that is ready to compile for either the AMD or CUDA/NVIDIA GPU environment.

  • RQuantLib 0.4.4: Several smaller updates

Giving Open-Source Projects Life After a Developer's Death

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Development
OSS

You've probably never heard of the late Jim Weirich or his software. But you've almost certainly used apps built on his work.

Weirich helped create several key tools for Ruby, the popular programming language used to write the code for sites like Hulu, Kickstarter, Twitter, and countless others. His code was open source, meaning that anyone could use it and modify it. "He was a seminal member of the western world's Ruby community," says Justin Searls, a Ruby developer and co-founder of the software company Test Double.

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More in Tux Machines

Librem 5 Phone Progress Report

  • Librem 5 Phone Progress Report – The First of Many More to Come!
    First, let me apologize for the silence. It was not because we went into hibernation for the winter, but because we were so busy in the initial preparation and planning of a totally new product while orienting an entirely new development team. Since we are more settled into place now, we want to change this pattern of silence and provide regular updates. Purism will be giving weekly news update posts every Tuesday, rotating between progress on phone development from a technology viewpoint (the hardware, kernel, OS, etc.) and an art of design viewpoint (UI/UX from GNOME/GTK to KDE/Plasma). To kickoff this new update process, this post will discus the technological progress of the Librem 5 since November of 2017.
  • Purism Eyeing The i.MX8M For The Librem 5 Smartphone, Issues First Status Update
    If you have been curious about the state of Purism's Librem 5 smartphone project since its successful crowdfunding last year and expedited plans to begin shipping this Linux smartphone in early 2019, the company has issued their first status update.

Benchmarking Retpoline-Enabled GCC 8 With -mindirect-branch=thunk

We have looked several times already at the performance impact of Retpoline support in the Linux kernel, but what about building user-space packages with -mindirect-branch=thunk? Here is the performance cost to building some performance tests in user-space with -mindirect-branch=thunk and -mindirect-branch=thunk-inline. Read more

An introduction to Inkscape for absolute beginners

Inkscape is a powerful, open source desktop application for creating two-dimensional scalable vector graphics. Although it's primarily an illustration tool, Inkscape is used for a wide range of computer graphic tasks. The variety of what can be done with Inkscape is vast and sometimes surprising. It is used to make diagrams, logos, programmatic marketing materials, web graphics, and even for paper scrapbooking. People also draw game sprites, produce banners, posters, and brochures. Others use Inkscape to draft web design mockups, detail layouts for printed circuit boards, or produce outline files to send to laser cutting equipment. Read more

Behind the scenes with Pop!_OS Linux

In October, Linux PC maker System76 released its homegrown version of Linux, Pop!_OS, giving users the choice between its legacy Ubuntu operating system or the new Pop!_OS flavor of Linux. Recently Opensource.com gave away a System76 laptop with Pop!_OS installed, which made me curious about the company and this new version of Linux, so I spoke with Cassidy James Blaede, Pop!_OS's user experience (UX) designer. Blaede joined System76 in 2014, fresh out of college at the University of Northern Iowa and marriage to his wife, Katie. While in college, he co-founded the elementary OS project and interned at UX consultancy Visual Logic, both of which influenced his work for System76. He started at System76 as a front-end developer and was later promoted to UX architect. Read more