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Development

LLVM 7.0.0 is Ready

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Development
BSD
  • [llvm-dev] [7.0.0 Release] The final tag is in

    The final version of 7.0.0 has been tagged from the branch at r342370. It is identical to rc3 modulo release notes and docs changes.

  • LLVM 7.0 Is Ready For Release

    The LLVM/Clang 7.0 release had been running a bit behind schedule and warranted a third release candidate, but this week LLVM 7.0.0 is now ready to ship.

    Release manager Hans Wennborg announced minutes ago on the mailing list that the 7.0.0 release has been tagged in their source tree. This ends up being the same as last week's 7.0-RC3 except for release notes and documentation updates.

  • LLVM Developers Still Discussing SPIR-V Support Within Clang

    One of the features that didn't materialize for LLVM / Clang 7.0 is the SPIR-V support within the compiler toolchain.

    While there has been a SPIR-V / LLVM translator out-of-tree and various developers at different vendors have been discussing for months the prospects of adding SPIR-V intermediate representation support to LLVM/Clang, it has yet to materialize.

    The latest developer discussion is to have a roundtable talk on the SPIR-V integration at the 2018 LLVM Developers' Meeting. This year the LLVM Developers' Meeting is happening at the San Jose Convention Center from 17 to 18 October.

Bulgaria prepares to build its own central code repository

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Development
OSS

In November, Bulgaria’s state eGovernment agency SEGA (Държавната агенция „Електронно управление“ ДАЕУ) will award a contract for building the country’s open source code repository. SEGA began studying submitted proposals this Tuesday. The repository, to be based on Git, will be hosting source all software newly developed by or for Bulgaria’s public services.

Read more

Jono Bacon: Linus, His Apology, And Why We Should Support Him

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Development
Linux

I am also mindful of ego. None of us like to admit we have an ago, but we all do. You don’t get to build one of the most fundamental technologies in the last thirty years and not have an ego. He built it…they came…and a revolution was energized because of what he created. While Linus’s ego is more subtle, and thankfully doesn’t extend to faddish self-promotion, overly expensive suits, and forays into Hollywood (quite the opposite), his ego has naturally resulted in abrupt opinions on how his project should run, sometimes plugging fingers in his ears to particularly challenging viewpoints from others. His post today is a clear example of him putting Linux as a project ahead of his own personal ego.

This is important for a few reasons. Firstly, being in such a public position and accepting your personal flaws isn’t a problem many people face, and isn’t a situation many people handle well. I work with a lot of CEOs, and they often say it is the loneliest job on the planet. I have heard American presidents say the same in interviews. This is because they are the top of the tree with all the responsibility and expectations on their shoulders. Put yourself in Linus’s position: his little project has blown up into a global phenomenon, and he didn’t necessarily have the social tools to be able to handle this change. Ego forces these internal struggles under the surface and to push them down and avoid them. So, to accept them as publicly and openly as he did today is a very firm step in the right direction. Now, the true test will be results, but we need to all provide the breathing space for him to accomplish them.

So, I would encourage everyone to give Linus a shot. This doesn’t mean the frustrations of the past are erased, and he has acknowledged and apologized for these mistakes as a first step. He has accepted he struggles with understanding other’s emotions, and a desire to help improve this for the betterment of the project and himself. He is a human, and the best tonic for humans to resolve their own internal struggles is the support and encouragement of other humans. This is not unique to Linus, but to anyone who faces similar struggles.

Read more

Also: Kernel prepatch 4.19-rc4; Linus taking a break

Programming: Masters and slaves, backing the wrong horse, and Julia

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Development
  • Redis does a Python, crushes 'offensive' master, slave code terms

    The open-source Redis database, like the Python programming language, is moving away from using the technical terms "master" and "slave" in its documentation and API – to the extent that's possible without breaking things.

    For Python, the decision this week to replace the words "master" and "slave", prompted by undisclosed complaints that they're offensive, led to a backlash.

    Meanwhile, those overseeing Python's CPython repo on Github today locked a pull request purging the words, and deleted several comments. But not before one developer highlighted the irony of executing the word change using the Git version-control software, which still relies heavily on "master" – for example, merging commits in the master branch. (Barely any instances of "slave" appear in Git code, though.)

    The Register asked Python developer Victor Stinner, author of the pull requests and Python bug report at the heart of the issue, whether he would like to discuss the controversy, but he declined. In previous comments, he justified his proposals to strip "master" and "slave" from the widely used programming language by saying some people object to the terms.

  • Backing the wrong horse?

    I started using the Ruby programming in around 2003 or 2004, but stopped at some point later, perhaps around 2008. At the time I was frustrated with the approach the Ruby community took for managing packages of Ruby software: Ruby Gems. They interact really badly with distribution packaging and made the jobs of organisations like Debian more difficult. This was around the time that Ruby on Rails was making a big splash for web application development (I think version 2.0 had just come out). I did fork out for the predominant Ruby on Rails book to try it out. Unfortunately the software was evolving so quickly that the very first examples in the book no longer worked with the latest versions of Rails. I wasn't doing a lot of web development that at the time anyway, so I put the book, Rails and Ruby itself on the shelf and moved on to looking at the Python programming language instead.

    Since then I've written lots of Python, both professionally and personally. Whenever it looked like a job was best solved with scripting, I'd pick up Python. I hadn't stopped to reflect on the experience much at all, beyond being glad I wasn't writing Perl any more (the first language I had any real traction with, 20 years ago).

  • Google's Dataset Search, Julia programming language, and more news

    TechRepublic described this programming language, originating from 2012 and just released as version 1.0, as follows: "designed to combine the speed of C with the usability of Python, the dynamism of Ruby, the mathematical prowess of MatLab, and the statistical chops of R."

    Liked by data scientists and mathematicians, Julia is also used in industries, such as the automotive industry for self-driving cars, and for 3-D printing.

    Julia is open source, counts 700 active contributors, 1,900 registered packages and two-million downloads. Details, download, and documentation can be found on julialang.org.

Stop using GitHub as a measure of open source contributions

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Development
Microsoft

It should go without saying, but apparently doesn’t, that GitHub hosts only a fraction of open source projects and activity.

GitHub launched about 10 years ago. Open source and free software development predates GitHub’s existence by twenty years or so. A lot of projects have picked up and moved from their previous homes to GitHub, but many haven’t. GNU projects, for example, aren’t hosted there. Canonical’s Launchpad repository hosts a lot of projects that aren’t on GitHub. Fedora has Pagure, the Eclipse project has its own source control for its projects, as well as the Apache Software Foundation, etc.

Some of those may mirror projects on GitHub, but it’s unclear to me how people who don’t have GitHub accounts are counted when people survey GitHub. I’m skeptical that using GitHub APIs to pull user data to see “what company does so-and-so work for?” is effective when that person hasn’t created a GitHub account.

GitHub metrics are biased towards newer projects, corporate-founded projects, and projects that have a bent towards non-reciprocal licenses.

Read more

​Cloud Foundry survey finds top enterprise languages

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Development

That said, the CFF also found that, "More and more, businesses are employing a polyglot and a multi-platform strategy to meet their exact needs." The CFF discovered 77 percent of enterprises are using or evaluating Platforms-as-a-Service (PaaS); 72 percent are using or considering containers; and 46 percent are using or thinking about serverless computing. Simultaneously, more than a third (39 percent) are using all three technologies together.

For companies this "flexibility of cloud-native practices enables [companies to move] away from a monolithic approach and towards a world of computing that is flexible, portable and interoperable." That means, while Java and JavaScript are only growing ever more popular, the larger the company, the more languages are used.

Read more

Python Programming and Politics, Events

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Development
  • Python Programming Language Ditches 'Master-Slave' Terms, Pissing Off Some

    A quiet debate has been brewing in the coding community for years that’s forced programmers to ask if using the terms “master” and “slave” are insensitive. Now, Python, one of the most popular high-level programming languages in the world, has ditched the terminology—and not everyone is happy about it.

    Master/Slave is generally used in hardware, architecture, and coding to refer to one device, database, or process controlling another. For more than a decade, there’s been some concern that the terms are offensive because of their relationship to the institution of slavery. Last week, a developer named Victo Stinner published four pull requests asking the Python community to consider changing the Master/Slave terms to something like Parent/Worker. “For diversity reasons, it would be nice to try to avoid ‘master’ and ‘slave’ terminology which can be associated to slavery,” he wrote to explain his thinking.

  • EuroPython 2018

    In July I took the train up to beautiful Edinburgh to attend the EuroPython 2018 conference. Despite using Python professionally for almost 8 years, this was my first experience of a Python conference. The schedule was packed, and it was challenging deciding what talks to attend, but I had a great time and enjoyed the strong community feeling of the event. We even went for a group run around Holyrood Park and Arthur’s Seat, which I hope is included in the schedule for future years.

    Now that the videos of the talks have all been published, I wanted to share my personal highlights, and list the talks I saw during and since the conference. I still haven’t caught up on everything I wanted to see, so I’ve also included my watch list.

Programming: Firefox Reality Development, RHEL/Fedora PHP, Python-Powered Xonsh

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Development
  • Firefox Reality Developers Guide

    Firefox Reality, Mozilla's VR web browser, is getting closer to release; so let's talk about how to make your experiences work well in this new browser.

  • PHP version 5.6.38, 7.0.32, 7.1.22 and 7.2.10
  • Xonsh – A Python-Powered Shell Language and Command Prompt

    Xonsh (pronounced “Konk“,) is a cross-platform, Python-powered, Unix shell language and command prompt designed for the use of experts and novices alike.

    The Xonsh language is a Python 3.4+ superset and it features additional shell primitives that make it familiar to working from IPython and Bash.

    Xonsh is easily scriptable and it allows you to mix both command prompt and python syntax coupled with a rich standard library, man-page completion, typed variables, and syntax highlighting, among other features.

Why Python is so popular with developers: 3 reasons the language has exploded

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Development

Python is the fastest-growing programming language in the world, as it increasingly becomes used in a wide range of developer job roles and data science positions across industries. But how did it become the go-to coding language for so many tasks?

"Python is very popular because of its set of robust libraries that make it such a dynamic and a fast programming language," said Kristen Sosulski, clinical associate professor of information, operations, and management sciences in the Leonard N. Stern School of Business at New York University, and author of Data Visualization Made Simple. "It's object-oriented, and it really allows for everything from creating a website, to app development, to creating different types of data models."

Read more

Linux Foundation and Kernel Events, Developments

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Development
  • Top 10 Reasons to Join the Premier European Open Source Event of the Year [Ed: LF advertises this event where Microsoft is Diamond sponsor (highest level). LF is thoroughly compromised, controlled by Linux's opposition.]
  • AT&T Spark conference panel highlights open source road map and needs [Ed: Linux Foundation working for/with a surveillance company]

    The telecommunications industry has been around for 141 years, but the past five have been the most disruptive, according to the Linux Foundation's Arpit Joshipura.

    Joshipura, general manager, networking and orchestration, said on a panel during Monday's AT&T Spark conference in San Francisco that the next five years will be marked by deployment phases across open source communities and the industry as a whole.

    "Its (telecommunications) been disrupted in just the last five years and the speed of innovation has skyrocketed in just the last five years since open source came out," Joshipura said.

  • A Hitchhiker’s Guide to Deploying Hyperledger Fabric on Kubernetes

    Deploying a multi-component system like Hyperledger Fabric to production is challenging. Join us Wednesday, September 26, 2018 9:00 a.m. Pacific for an introductory webinar, presented by Alejandro (Sasha) Vicente Grabovetsky and Nicola Paoli of AID:Tech.

  • IDA: simplifying the complex task of allocating integers

    It is common for kernel code to generate unique integers for identifiers. When one plugs in a flash drive, it will show up as /dev/sdN; that N (a letter derived from a number) must be generated in the kernel, and it should not already be in use for another drive or unpleasant things will happen. One might think that generating such numbers would not be a difficult task, but that turns out not to be the case, especially in situations where many numbers must be tracked. The IDA (for "ID allocator", perhaps) API exists to handle this specialized task. In past kernels, it has managed to make the process of getting an unused number surprisingly complex; the 4.19 kernel has a new IDA API that simplifies things considerably.

    Why would the management of unique integer IDs be complex? It comes down to the usual problems of scalability and concurrency. The IDA code must be able to track potentially large numbers of identifiers in an efficient way; in particular, it must be able to find a free identifier within a given range quickly. In practice, that means using a radix tree (or, soon, an XArray) to track allocations. Managing such a data structure requires allocating memory, which may be difficult to do in the context where the ID is required. Concurrency must also be managed, in that two threads allocating or freeing IDs in the same space should not step on each other's toes.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Ubuntu MATE 18.10 Released for GPD Pocket PCs, Raspberry Pi Images Coming Soon

Shipping with the latest MATE 1.20.3 desktop environment and Linux 4.18 kernel, Ubuntu MATE 18.10 is now available with updated apps and core components, better hardware support, and, for the first time, images for the GDP Pocket and GDP Pocket 2 handheld computers, along with the generic images for 64-bit Intel PCs. According to Martin Wimpress, Ubuntu MATE 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) includes some hardware-specific tweaks and other improvements to core components in an attempt to make the Linux-based operating system work out-of-the-box and without any hiccups on both the GDP Pocket and GDP Pocket 2 tiny computers. Read more

Plasma 5.14.2

Today KDE releases a Bugfix update to KDE Plasma 5, versioned 5.14.2. Plasma 5.14 was released in October with many feature refinements and new modules to complete the desktop experience. Read more Also: KDE Plasma 5.14.2 Desktop Environment Improves Firmware Updates, Snap Support

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

  • Red Hat: Creativity is risky (and other truths open leaders need to hear)
    Leaders are all too aware of the importance of invention and innovation. Today, the health and wealth of their businesses have become increasingly dependent on the creation of new products and processes. In the digital age especially, competition is more fierce than ever as global markets open and expand. Just keeping pace with change requires a focus on constant improvement and consistent learning. And that says nothing about building for tomorrow.
  • APAC Financial Services Institutions Bank on Red Hat to Enhance Agility
  • APAC banks aim to use open source to enhance agility
  • Huawei CloudFabric Supports Container Network Deployment Automation, Improving Enterprise Service Agility
    At HUAWEI CONNECT 2018, Huawei announced that its CloudFabric Cloud Data Center Solution supports container network deployment automation and will be available for the industry-leading enterprise Kubernetes platform via a new plug-in.
  • Redis Labs Integrates With Red Hat OpenShift, Hits 1B Milestone
    Redis Labs is integrating its enterprise platform as a hosted and managed database service on Red Hat’s OpenShift Container Platform. That integration includes built-in support for Red Hat’s recently launched Kubernetes Operator. The Redis Enterprise integration will allow customers to deploy and manage Redis databases as a stateful Kubernetes service. It will also allow users to run Redis Enterprise on premises or across any cloud environment.
  • Needham & Company Starts Red Hat (RHT) at Buy
  • Fedora Toolbox — Hacking on Fedora Silverblue
    Fedora Silverblue is a modern and graphical operating system targetted at laptops, tablets and desktop computers. It is the next-generation Fedora Workstation that promises painless upgrades, clear separation between the OS and applications, and secure and cross-platform applications. The basic operating system is an immutable OSTree image, and all the applications are Flatpaks. It’s great! However, if you are a hacker and decide to set up a development environment, you immediately run into the immutable OS image and the absence of dnf. You can’t install your favourite tools, editors and SDKs the way you’d normally do on Fedora Workstation. You can either unlock your immutable OS image to install RPMs through rpm-ostree and give up the benefit of painless upgrades; or create a Docker container to get an RPM-based toolbox but be prepared to mess around with root permissions and having to figure out why your SSH agent or display server isn’t working.
  • Fedora 28 : Alien, Steam and Fedora distro.