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Core i9 7980XE GCC 9 AVX Compiler Tuning Performance Benchmarks

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Development
GNU
Graphics/Benchmarks

Continuing on with our benchmarks this month of the newly-released GCC 9 compiler, here are some additional numbers for the AVX-512-enabled Intel Core i9 7980XE processor on Ubuntu Linux when testing tuning for various AVX widths.

These latest Intel Core i9 benchmarks of the newly pressed GCC 9 compiler show the performance when running various C/C++ benchmarks after being built with CFLAGS/CXXFLAGS of "-O3 -march=skylake", "-O3 -march=skylake-avx512 -mprefer-vector-width=128", "-O3 -march=skylake-avx512 -mprefer-vector-width=256" and "-O3 -march=skylake-avx512 -mprefer-vector-width=512"

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today's howtos and programming leftovers

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Development
HowTos

Build Your Own Internet Radio Receiver

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Development
OSS

When I get home at night, I like to tune into the world with the push of a button. I've lived in lots of different places—from Dunedin, New Zealand, to Santa Fe, New Mexico—and in each town, I've come to love a radio station (usually a community radio station) that embodies the spirit of the place. With the push of a button, I can get a bit back in sync with each of these places and also visit new communities, thanks to internet radio.

Why build your own internet radio receiver? One option, of course, is simply to use an app for a receiver. However, I've found that the most common apps don't keep their focus on the task at hand, and are increasingly distracted by offering additional social-networking services. And besides, I want to listen now. I don't want to check into my computer or phone, log in yet again, and endure the stress of recalling YAPW (Yet Another PassWord). I've also found that the current offering of internet radio boxes falls short of my expectations. Like I said, I've lived in a lot of places—more than two or four or eight. I want a lot of buttons, so I can tune in to a radio station with just one gesture. Finally, I've noticed that streams are increasingly problematic if I don't go directly to the source. Often, streams chosen through a "middle man" start with an ad or blurb that is tacked on as a preamble. Or sometimes the "middle man" might tie me to a stream of lower audio quality than the best being served up.

So, I turned to building my own internet radio receiver—one with lots of buttons that allow me to "tune in" without being too pushy. In this article, I share my experience. In principle, it should be easy—you just need a Linux distro, a ship to sail her on and an external key pad for a rudder. In practice, it's not too hard, but there are a few obstacles along the course that I hope to help you navigate.

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today's howtos and programming

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Development
HowTos

today's howtos and programming

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Development
HowTos

Programming: JavaScript, Perl, Python and C++

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Development
  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Knockout

    This week’s open-source project is Knockout (KO) and it works purely on JavaScript. KO is a JavaScript MVVM (a modern variant of MVC) library that enables developers to create rich, desktop-like user interfaces with JavaScript and HTML.

    KO uses “observers” that help the UI stay in sync with an underlying data model and declarative bindings to enable productive development, according to Knockout’s page on GitHub.

  • Why I love Perl 6

    love Perl 6 because, if that solution seems too scary to you
    (too infinite, too lazy, too concurrent, too pipelined, too Unicoded,
    too declarative, too functional, too much like something that
    an Erlang guru would code), then Perl 6 will equally allow you
    to write a plain and simple version: one that's imperative, iterative,
    block structured, variable-driven, pure ASCII, and more-or-less
    exactly what you'd write in Perl 5, or even in C: [...]

  • Python's creator thinks it has a diversity problem [Ed: Python has Microsoft entryism problems (far more urgent than this)]
  • Evennia: Creating Evscaperoom, part 1
  • Evennia: Creating Evscaperoom, part 2
  • Dissecting boost::astar_search

    Right now, I am having a hard time understanding BGL’s (the Boost Graph Library) template spaghetti, so decided to write a blogpost while I decipher it, one at a time, documenting the whole thing along the way.

  • KTextEditor/Kate Bugs – Scratch Your Own Itch

Programming Leftovers

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Development

Programming/Development: Python Natural Language Processing, DevNation Federal, KTextEditor/Kate, Blender3D

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Development
  • Top 10 Python NLP Libraries For 2019

    With the help of Natural Language Processing, an organisation can gain valuable insights, patterns, and solutions. Python is one of the widely used languages and it is implemented in almost all fields and domains. In this article, we list down 10 important Python Natural Language Processing Language libraries.

  • DevNation Federal brings open source to the Beltway

    On June 27th, Red Hat will not only be hosting one of the best technical gatherings of 2019, but it will be doing so in Washington D.C. — not San Francisco, Seattle, or ... DevNation Federal conference will bring together industry experts and key maintainers of popular open source projects in a one-day immersive conference for federal developers.

  • KTextEditor/Kate Bugs – Help Appreciated

    The bug report count of KTextEditor (implementing the editing part used in Kate/KWrite/KDevelop/Kile/…) and Kate itself reached again some value over 200.

    If you have time and need an itch to scratch, any help to tackle the currently open bugs would be highly appreciated.

    The full list can be found with this bugs.kde.org query.

    [...]

    The team working on the code is small, therefore please be a bit patient if you wait for reactions. I hope we have improved our reaction time in the last months but we still are lacking in that respect.

  • Blender3D User interface and API Freeze

    In the last month, we’ve polished the user interface and added the last planned features to Blender 2.80. The details can be found in the weekly development notes.

    Now we are freezing the user interface, so that there is a stable base for creating documentation and tutorials. Settings will stay in the same place and screenshots should remain valid for the final 2.80 release. A handful of menu entries may be added, or a tooltip might be improved, but nothing major that would break documentation.

  • Blender 2.80 Reaches Its API & UI Freeze

    In order to meet the July release target for Blender 2.80, there is now an API and user-interface freeze on this next feature update for this leading open-source, cross-platform 3D modeling software.

    Blender 2.80 has now entered its UI and API freeze milestone for the 2.80 release. The Blender settings should also be maintained now moving forward for the Blender 2.80 release and its Python API compatibility, including for add-ons.

Programming: SVE2, Graphical Interface, Guile, Python and More

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Development
  • Arm SVE2 Support Aligning For GCC 10, LLVM Clang 9.0

    Given the significant performance benefits to Arm's Scalable Vector Extension 2 (SVE2), they are working on ensuring the open-source Linux compiler toolchains support these new CPU instructions ahead of SoCs shipping that support this big addition.

    Arm announced Scalable Vector Extension 2 (SVE2) recently as their latest advancement around SIMD programming and increasing data-level parallelism in programs. SVE2 is designed to ultimately deliver better SIMD performance than their long-available Neon extensions and to scale the performance with vector length increases as well as enabling auto-vectorization techniques. More details in this post on SVE2.

  • Intake: Discovering and Exploring Data in a Graphical Interface

    Do you have data that you’d like people to be able to explore on their own? Are you always passing around snippets of code to load specific data files? These are problems that people encounter all the time when working in groups and using the same datasources or when trying to distribute data to the public. Some users are comfortable interacting with data entirely programatically, but often it is helpful to use a GUI (Graphical User Interface) instead. With that in mind we have reimplemented the Intake GUI so that in addition to working in a jupyter notebook, it can be served as a web application next to your data, or at any endpoint.

  • lightening run-time code generation

    The upcoming Guile 3 release will have just-in-time native code generation. Finally, amirite? There's lots that I'd like to share about that and I need to start somewhere, so this article is about one piece of it: Lightening, a library to generate machine code.

  • Python Language Creator: “Male Attitude” Is Hurting The Programming Space

    Guido van Rossum is a famous name in the programming world. He is the creator of the Python programming language which was developed back in 1989. It is only since the last few years when this general-purpose programming language started gaining popularity.

    The number of Python users has increased significantly and it was not only named as the best programming language by IEEE but also the most asked-about language on Stack Overflow, overthrowing JavaScript — the all-time winner for decades.

  • Avant-IDLE: an experiment
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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Stable kernels 5.1.10, 4.19.51, and 4.14.126

  • Linux 5.1.10
    I'm announcing the release of the 5.1.10 kernel. All users of the 5.1 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 5.1.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.1.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...
  • Linux 4.19.51
  • Linux 4.14.126

Android Leftovers

My personal journey from MIT to GPL

As I got started writing open source software, I generally preferred the MIT license. I actually made fun of the “copyleft” GPL licenses, on the grounds that they are less free. I still hold this opinion today: the GPL license is less free than the MIT license - but today, I believe this in a good way.

[...]

I don’t plan on relicensing my historical projects, but my new projects have used the GPL family of licenses for a while now. I think you should seriously consider it as well.

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