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Programming: DApp, Groovy, TensorFlown and a Lot More

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Development
  • Chinese Tech Giant Baidu Launches Blockchain OS to Support DApp Development

    Chinese search engine and web services company Baidu has launched its Baidu Blockchain Engine (BBE), an operating system designed to facilitate decentralized application (DApp) development. The news was officially announced by Baidu’s cloud computing unit, Baidu Cloud, on Feb. 14.
    Baidu Cloud states that it considers an open source, commercialized platform to be “the only way to build a blockchain operating system.” BBE has reportedly been built on the basis of Baidu’s “ABC” technology strategy — artificial intelligence (AI), big data and cloud computing —  and aims to make DApp development “as simple as creating a mobile app.”

  • How is the Eclipse Foundation Specification Process (EFSP) different from the Java Community Process (JCP)?

    As most of you are aware, Oracle has contributed the Java EE specification to the Eclipse Foundation. The enterprise Java community decided to rename the Java EE specification to Jakarta EE. Part of this huge transition to open source is changing the specification process. The famous Java Community Process (JCP) is going to be replaced by the Eclipse Foundation Specification Process (EFSP), which will be better suited for vendor neutrality, transparency, and all other attributes associated with open source. So what exactly is the difference?

    To learn more about the new process, please refer to the EFSP v1.0, and Wayne Beaton’s article in this newsletter.

  • How To Build A Successful Developer Community

    As a community starter, the first question one should ask themselves is why developers want to join the community: is it because they are going to learn new skills or make their work easier?

    What is the impetus for building the community by asking questions like, whether the community is built around an open-source project? Are the developer tools available? Is there a platform with an API? Is it like a partner ecosystem? Or is it just selling a product?

  • Ember.js video documentary released

    Besides being an interesting piece of content for developers and open-source enthusiasts around the world, the documentary also addresses the human element of open-source software and the power of community.

    The documentary starts off with Tom Dale telling the story about how in the early days of creating web apps using Javascript, people where telling them, "please stop using Javascript", and "you guys are abusing the system" - but they had to stick with the vision and see it through and today, everyone uses Javascript to create web applications.

  • Why 2019 Will Be the Year for Shift-Left Mainframe Testing

    While 2018 was the year for planning and implementing shift-left methodologies in testing, mainframe and server testers were, for the most part, left behind. These legacy infrastructure experts were tied down to old-school testing tools. Mainframes kept functioning, but tools and testing practices often became bottlenecks, preventing performance testing teams from testing more quickly mid-cycle and pre-release.

  • Ubisoft's Clever-Commit AI will sniff out bugs in Firefox

    GAMES DO ENCOURAGE VIOLENCE, but against bugs in the case Ubisoft which has partnered with Mozilla to build out an artificial intelligence (AI) system that sniffs out code gremlins.

    Dubbed Clever-Commit, the AI will act as a form of coding assistant that learns from a developer's base bug and regression data to predict and flag potential new bugs that might be added as new code is slapped onto the codebase.

    The system, which is already being used internally by Ubisoft, will be adopted by Mozilla to review Firefox code and spot dodgy bits, with the goal of making the browser more stable for its users. But if the systems works well, Mozilla has plans to stick it further into Firefox.

  • Ubisoft and Mozilla team up to develop Clever-Commit, an AI coding assistant

    Game developer Ubisoft today announced that it has partnered with Mozilla to develop Clever-Commit, an AI-based coding assistant that learns from your code base’s bug and regression data to analyze and flag potential new bugs as new code is committed. Ubisoft already uses this tool internally and Mozilla  says that it will deploy it to spot bugs in its Firefox code.

  • Programming languages: Python rides high but Groovy is cool again with developers

    Groovy, which came to life in 2007, hasn't been a top-20 language in Tiobe's index since 2016 but in the February listing it is now at 19th place, up from 49th last year. 

    Groovy hit its stride as a language for writing scripts for popular continuous-integration tool Jenkins, but it's also been buoyed by the Gradle open-source build-automation system. According to Tiobe, these days more 'glue' software is being written in Groovy. 

  • The Deep Learning Framework Backed By Facebook Is Getting Industry's Attention

    When it comes to deep learning frameworks, TensorFlow is one of the most preferred toolkits.

  • Inside the AI developer’s toolbox
  • Guide To Web Scraping With Python Libraries Selenium & Beautiful Soup
  • Speeding up basic object operations in Cython
  • Python’s str.isdigit vs. str.isnumeric
  • Test and Code: 65: one assert per test
  • Setting up Tor hidden service
  • How to install WildFly (JBoss) on Ubuntu 18.04

Daniel García Moreno: I'm a hacker

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Development
GNOME

The hack computer is built on top of the Endless OS. Endless OS is based on debian and the desktop is a modified gnome shell, but it's not the usual debian derivative, it's based on OSTree. The main difference is that the root filesystem is read only and updates are managed with ostree, that's like a git repository.

This kind of Operating System is easier to maintain, because the user can't modify the base system, so this means that he was unable to break it. All user applications are installed via flatpak, so are independent of the OS version and because of flathub you can install latests version of apps without the need to update the full operating system.

This is the way that Fedora SilverBlue is trying to follow and is a new way to build and distribute GNU/Linux.

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HowTos and Programming Leftovers

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Development
HowTos

Python 2.7.16 release candidate 1 available

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Development

A release candidate for the upcoming 2.7.16 bug fix release is now available for download.

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Debian Developers' Updates and Python Bits

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Development
Debian

Programming: Choosing Between Go and Rust, Python, R-tree and R

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Development
  • The developer’s dilemma: Choosing between Go and Rust

    If you were to make a list of important programming languages that have appeared in the past decade, Go and Rust would almost certainly be featured on it.

    Similarly, if you were to sit down and think about which programming languages are best suited to developing secure, microservices-friendly frameworks or applications today, you might find yourself debating between Go and Rust.

    If you’re struggling to decide whether Go or Rust is a better language for your development needs, keep reading. This post compares Go and Rust, explaining how they are similar, how they’re different, and what each can do for you.

  • pprint.isrecursive: Check if object requires recursive representation
  • Performance benchmark on mdds R-tree

    I must say that I am overall very pleased with the performance of R-tree. I can already envision various use cases where R-tree will be immensely useful. One area I’m particularly interested in is spreadsheet application’s formula dependency tracking mechanism which involves tracing through chained dependency targets to broadcast cell value changes. Since the spreadsheet organizes its data in terms of row and column positions which is 2-dimensional in nature, R-tree can probably be useful for speeding things up in that area.

  • In memory of Monty Hall

    To explore this a bit further and to have a nice exercise with R, a small simulation of games is created.

Programming: Emacs Org, ISO C++, PyCharm and Recursive Programming

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Development
  • The world’s most advanced UNICs of Organizers

    I recently began using Emacs Org mode, a tool for keeping notes, maintaining TODO lists, planning projects, and authoring documents with a fast and effective plain-text system.
    Since I am a cosplayer I was looking for a repacement for Cosplanner, a non-free Android app. When I was still using Android, I once installed Cosplanner and found out that it has many nasty features. So I deleted my copy. Unlike Cosplanner, Orgmode uses a human readable text format that you can read with any text editor. This allows the user to store an Orgmode file in a git repository that can be synced between devices.

  • November 2018 ISO C++ meeting trip report (Core Language)

    The ISO C++ standards meeting in November 2018 was held in San Diego, CA. As usual, Red Hat sent three of us to the meeting: me (for the Core Language Working Group), Jonathan Wakely (for the Library Working Group [LEWG]), and Thomas Rodgers (for the Concurrency and Parallelism Study Group [SG1]). I felt the meeting was productive, though some features that had been expected to make it into C++20 are now in question.

  • PyCharm 2019.1 EAP 4

    Our fourth Early Access Program (EAP) version for PyCharm 2019.1 is now available on our website.

  • Recursive Programming

    Despite often being introduced early-on in most ventures into programming, the concept of recursion can seem strange and potentially off-putting upon first encountering it. It seems almost paradoxical: how can we find a solution to a problem using the solution to the same problem?

Programming: Conda-Forge, Meson Quest, PyLadies Auction at PyCon 2019 and More

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Development

Programming: WebKitGTK, Qt, Python and More

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Development
  • WebKitGTK 2.23.90 Adds Support For JPEG2000, More Touchpad Gestures

    It missed the GNOME 3.32 Beta by a week, but out today is the WebKitGTK 2.23.90 release, the downstream of the WebKit web layout engine focused on GTK integration and used by the likes of GNOME Web (Epiphany).

    Interestingly, this WebKitGTK release adds support for JPEG2000. That support is a bit surprising considering outside of Apple's Safari browsers, JPEG2000 isn't really supported by other web browsers for this offshoot of JPEG that has never been widely adopted. But now nearly two decades after JPEG2000 was published, it's at least supported by WebKitGTK.

  • Chakrma: Frameworks 5.55.0, Plasma 5.15.0, and Applications 18.12.2 by KDE are now available

    Most of our mirrors synchronize with the central repositories on the origin server within 24 hours. Use the mirror status web page to see when your mirror of choice last synchronized.

  • Qt on CMake Workshop Summary – Feb 2019

    Last Monday and Tuesday a few brave souls from both the Qt Company and KDAB gathered together in the KDAB Berlin office premises to work on the CMake build system for building Qt. There was Mikhail, Liang, Tobias, Kai (QtCompany) as well as Jean-Michaël, Allen, Volker and me (KDAB) sitting together in a tight room, focusing solely on the CMake port of Qt.

  • Python 3.8 alpha in Fedora
  • Fedora 31 Is Already Planning Ahead For Python 3.8

    While Fedora 30 isn't debuting for another three months, with the system-wide change deadline already having passed on that release, ambitious Fedora developers are already thinking about early feature plans for Fedora 31 that will debut in November.

    One of the first Fedora 31 system-wide change proposals is for upgrading from Python 3.7 to Python 3.8. Python 3.7 was released just last summer and the Python 3.8.0 release isn't even expected until the end of October, but given it will be another big update to Python3, Fedora developers are working on coordinating the upgrade early to prevent possible fallout late in the cycle.

  • What You Don't Know About Python Variables

    The first time you get introduced to Python’s variable, it is usually defined as “parts of your computer’s memory where you store some information.” Some define it as a “storage placeholder for texts and numbers.” We will soon find out that Python’s variable is deeper than this.

  • Some Attention to Detail
  • Mozilla GFX: WebRender newsletter #40
  • A GPIOZero Theramin for Valentine's Day

Programming: Python 3, Theia and More

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Development
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today's howtos

GCC 8.3 Released and GCC 9 Plans

  • GCC 8.3 Released
    The GNU Compiler Collection version 8.3 has been released. GCC 8.3 is a bug-fix release from the GCC 8 branch containing important fixes for regressions and serious bugs in GCC 8.2 with more than 153 bugs fixed since the previous release. This release is available from the FTP servers listed at: http://www.gnu.org/order/ftp.html Please do not contact me directly regarding questions or comments about this release. Instead, use the resources available from http://gcc.gnu.org. As always, a vast number of people contributed to this GCC release -- far too many to thank them individually!
  • GCC 8.3 Released With 153 Bug Fixes
    While the GCC 9 stable compiler release is a few weeks away in the form of GCC 9.1, the GNU Compiler Collection is up to version 8.3.0 today as their newest point release to last year's GCC 8 series.
  • GCC 9 Compiler Picks Up Official Support For The Arm Neoverse N1 + E1
    Earlier this week Arm announced their next-generation Neoverse N1 and E1 platforms with big performance potential and power efficiency improvements over current generation Cortex-A72 processor cores. The GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) ahead of the upcoming GCC9 release has picked up support for the Neoverse N1/E1. This newly-added Neoverse N1 and E1 CPU support for GCC9 isn't all that surprising even with the very short time since announcement and GCC9 being nearly out the door... Arm developers had already been working on (and landed) the Arm "Ares" CPU support, which is the codename for what is now the Neoverse platform.

Android Leftovers

5 Linux GUI Cloud Backup Tools

We have reached a point in time where most every computer user depends upon the cloud … even if only as a storage solution. What makes the cloud really important to users, is when it’s employed as a backup. Why is that such a game changer? By backing up to the cloud, you have access to those files, from any computer you have associated with your cloud account. And because Linux powers the cloud, many services offer Linux tools. Let’s take a look at five such tools. I will focus on GUI tools, because they offer a much lower barrier to entry to many of the CLI tools. I’ll also be focusing on various, consumer-grade cloud services (e.g., Google Drive, Dropbox, Wasabi, and pCloud). And, I will be demonstrating on the Elementary OS platform, but all of the tools listed will function on most Linux desktop distributions. Read more