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GCC 5.0 Outruns LLVM 3.5 Compiler By A Bit On Core-AVX2

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Development
GNU
Graphics/Benchmarks

In anticipation of the LLVM 3.5 release that brings a number of new compiler features -- including possible performance improvements from our benchmarking done earlier today -- here's some benchmarks comparing LLVM Clang 3.5 RC3 to a recent SVN snapshot of the GCC 5.0 compiler that's presently under development.

GCC 5.0 is still under heavy stage one development and isn't anticipated for release likely until H1'2015, so there's still a ways to go with the GNU Compiler Collection, but these brief benchmarks today should provide some nice perspective for how it's shaping up against LLVM Clang 3.5. Of course, as GCC 5.0 nears, we'll have plenty more compiler benchmarks over the months ahead.

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INTERMEDIATE RESULTS OF THE ICON TESTS: BREEZE

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Development
KDE

The introduction of the new Breeze icon set in KDE let us again wonder, what aspects of an icon set actually takes what impact on the usability of it. We investigated Oxygen and Tango Icons for the LibreOffice project before, but our focus then was on checking all icons of the standard tool bar. This time we focus on different icon sets and will use 13 common actions to compare them.
With this series we are going to test at least 10 different free icon sets: Breeze, Oxygen, Tango, Faenza, Nuvola, Nitrux, Elementary, Crystal Project, Humanity and Treepata. These icon sets differ on various aspects: use of color and details, flat or not and sometimes even on the metaphor used.

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LLVM Clang 3.5 Brings Some Compiler Performance Improvements

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Development
BSD

If all goes well, LLVM 3.5 will be released today. While we have already delivered some LLVM/Clang benchmarks of the 3.5 SVN code, over the days ahead we will be delivering more benchmarks of the updated compiler stack -- including looking at its performance against the in-development GCC 5.0. For getting this latest series of compiler benchmarking at Phoronix started, here's some fresh numbers of LLVM Clang 3.4 compared to a recent release candidate of LLVM Clang 3.5.

This article is using a CompuLab Intense-PC with Intel Core i7 3517UE Ivy Bridge processor for LLVM Clang 3.4 vs. LLVM Clang 3.5 benchmarking. The host system was Ubuntu 14.04 x86_64 and was running off the Linux 3.17 development kernel. Both compilers were built in their optimized release mode (--disable-assertions --enable-optimized) for the core-avx-i CPU. Aside from switching out LLVM Clang 3.4 for LLVM Clang 3.5 RC4, no other system changes were made.

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How to set up Raspberry Pi, the little computer you can cook into DIY tech projects

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Development
Linux

You don't need an electrical engineering degree to build a robot army. With the $35 Raspberry Pi B+, you can create robots and connected devices on the cheap, with little more than an Internet connection and a bunch of spare time.

The Raspberry Pi is a computer about the size of a credit card. The darling of the do-it-yourself electronics crowd, the Pi was originally designed to teach kids computer and programming skills without the need for expensive computer labs. People have used Raspberry Pis for everything from robots to cheap home media centers.

The Pi sports USB ports, HDMI video, and a host of other peripherals. The latest version, the B+, sports 512MB of RAM and uses a MicroSD card instead of a full-size card.

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Black Lab SDK 1.8 released

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Development
KDE

QT Creator - for QT 5
Gambas 3 - Visual Basic for Linux
Ubuntu Quickly - Quick and dirty development tool for python
emacs and Xemacs - Advanced Text Editor
Anjuta and Glade - C++ RAD development tool for GTK
Netbeans - Java development environment
GNAT-GPS - IDE for the following programming languages. Ada, C, JavaScript, Pascal and Python
Idle - IDE for Python
Scite - Text Editor

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Emacs & the obsessive email mongerer

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Development
Software

I had already mentioned in passing here that I am using Emacs for a variety of tasks: outline, project management and planning with Org-Mode, IRC (go figure, my default email client on all my machines is Emacs’ ERC), notes editing or quick scribbling with the Scartch buffer (happens to me all day long), and regularly, albeit less frequently than in 2013, various editing of html pages, javascript and sometimes even Python when I dare to edit one or two things in Python scripts. A consequence of all these use cases is that I have Emacs open almost everyday on almost any of my machines.

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Git 2.1 Released: What's New

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Development

Two-and-a-half months after Git 2.0, a new version of Git has been released. Though a minor update, the list of new features and improvements is large.

The complete release notes can be found on git repository and provide full details about what can be found in Git 2.1. What follows provides a minimal selection of new features in Git 2.1.

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Watch: "JavaScript: If you love it, set it free"

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Development
GNU

FSF executive director John Sullivan spoke at this year's FOSDEM, a volunteer-organized conference held in Belgium that highlights the development of free software.

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New Human Interface Guidelines for GNOME and GTK+

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Development
GNOME

I’ve recently been hard at work on a new and updated version of the GNOME Human Interface Guidelines, and am pleased to announce that this will be ready for the upcoming 3.14 release.

Over recent years, application design has evolved a huge amount. The web and native applications have become increasingly similar, and new design patterns have become the norm. During that period, those of us in the GNOME Design Team have worked with developers to expand the range of GTK+’s capabilities, and the result is a much more modern toolkit.

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Eclipse Luna for Fedora 20

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Development
Red Hat
Software

If you are a Fedora Eclipse user, then you're probably saddened since the release of Eclipse Luna (4.4) because you are still using Eclipse Kepler (4.3) on Fedora 20.

Well, be saddened no longer because Eclipse Luna is now available for Fedora 20 as a software collection!

A software collection is simply a set of RPMs whose contents are isolated from the rest of your system such that they do not modify, overwrite or otherwise conflict with anything in the main Fedora repositories. This allows you install multiple versions of a software stack side-by-side, without them interfering with one another. More can be read about this mechanism on the software collections website.

The Eclipse Luna software collection lives in a separate yum repository, which must be configured by clicking on this link to install the release package.

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More in Tux Machines

Devices: Adding Linux to A PDP-11, Adding GNU/Linux Software to Chrome OS, and Adding Ubuntu to Android

  • Adding Linux To A PDP-11
    The UNIBUS architecture for DEC’s PDPs and Vaxxen was a stroke of genius. If you wanted more memory in your minicomputer, just add another card. Need a drive? Plug it into the backplane. Of course, with all those weird cards, these old UNIBUS PDPs are hard to keep running. The UniBone is the solution to this problem. It puts Linux on a UNIBUS bridge, allowing this card to serve as a memory emulator, a test console, a disk emulator, or any other hardware you can think of. The key to this build is the BeagleBone, everyone’s second-favorite single board computer that has one feature the other one doesn’t: PRUs, or a programmable real-time unit, that allows you to blink a lot of pins very, very fast. We’ve seen the BeagleBone be used as Linux in a terminal, as the rest of the computer for an old PDP-10 front panel and as the front end for a PDP-11/03.
  • Chrome OS Linux apps will soon be able to access your entire Downloads folder and Google Drive
    Google is working hard to turn Chrome OS into more than just a browser, but a real, functional operating system for consumers of all kinds. Most recently, they’ve invited developers to the platform with Linux app support that enables all of their tools, including Android Studio, to work as expected. Soon, your Chrome OS and Google Drive files will be even more accessible to your Linux apps. [...] According to a new commit on the Chromium Gerrit, that’s all about to change. The commit primarily pertains to a new dialog that will be shown when sharing ‘root’ folders like My Drive or Downloads with your Chrome OS Linux apps (internally known as Crostini) container. The dialog is intended to forewarn you that sharing a root folder is a bit more serious than just sharing a sub-folder, and to be sure you know what you’re doing.
  • Samsung Note 9 and Tab S4 owners can run a full Ubuntu Desktop – Linux on Dex
    We have come a long way as an industry and if this is not one of the biggest milestones in personal computing, I don’t know what else qualifies. Over the past decade of smartphones being around, we have seen an exponential increase in the power that our smartphones pack. I mean, flagships from the past few years spot more RAM and processing power than most laptops out there, but the small form factor has always been a hindrance to the utilization of this power. I mean you can only do so much on a 5.5-inch display. Samsung has launched its “Linux on Dex” app in beta and is inviting geeks and tinkerers to register and help test and develop it. The app lets owners of specific Samsung devices “run” a full Ubuntu desktop on their device alongside Android.

What blockchain can learn from open source

Over the 10+ years I've been involved with open source, I've been part of small projects with innovative ideas that grew into large projects with solid communities. I've also witnessed the way dysfunctional communities can suck the energy from projects. I've also recently become active in blockchain by writing and contributing to projects. I've noticed that blockchain projects are like startups with open development and open business models. Therefore, to be successful, blockchain startups must learn how to build communities the open source way. Read more

Congatec shows off Qseven and SMARC modules with new i.MX8X

Congatec announced two industrial, Linux-ready modules equipped with NXP’s dual- or quad-A35 i.MX8X SoC: the Conga-QMX8X (Qseven) with optional PoE and the Conga-SMX8X (SMARC 2.0) with optional WiFi. When either Variscite or Congatec announces a computer-on-module based on a new processor, the other company typically follows suit shortly thereafter. After Variscite announced its NXP i.MX8X-based VAR-SOM-MX8X module on Nov. 13, Congatec followed up with a pair of i.MX8X Qseven and SMARC 2.0 modules: the Conga-QMX8X and Conga-SMX8X. None of these COMs have announced ship dates (or prices), so it’s unclear which will arrive first, or whether they’ll be beaten to market by the phyCORE-i.MX 8X module, announced back in March. Read more

Akash Angle: How do you Fedora?

Akash is a fan of the GNOME 3 desktop environment. He loves most of the goodies and bells and whistles the OS can throw in for getting basic tasks done. For practical reasons he prefers a fresh installation as a way of upgrading to the latest Fedora version. He thinks Fedora 29 is arguably the the best workstation out there. Akash says this has been backed up by reviews of various tech evangelists and open source news sites. Read more