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Development

Tizen IVI SDK – 3.0 Alpha 4 is Available to Download

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Development
Linux

The Tizen In-Vehicle Infotainment Software Developers Kit (IVI SDK) is a now available for you to download and runs on Windows*, Ubuntu*, and Mac OS X*. It includes Emulator (based on QEMU), Web Simulator, IDE, documents and samples, and supports a real IVI device as a target.

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Google offers sweet new SDK to let Android devs join 'Lollipop' guild

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Android
Development

Android 5.0 "Lollipop" won't ship to the public for a couple more weeks, but Google has tossed developers a bone by releasing the final SDK and system images for select Nexus devices ahead of launch.

The new Lollipop SDK that posted on Friday replaces the earlier Android L Developer Preview that the Chocolate Factory offered up at its annual Google I/O conference in June.

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libguestfs 1.28 released

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Development

The new stable version of libguestfs — a C library and tools for accessing and modifying virtual machine disk images — has been released.

There is one brand new tool, virt-log. And I rewrote the virt-v2v and virt-p2v tools. These tools convert VMware and Xen guests and physical machines, to run on KVM. They are now much faster and better than before.

As well as that there are hundreds of other improvements and bug fixes. For a full list, see the release notes.

Libguestfs 1.28 will be available shortly in Fedora 21, Debian/experimental, RHEL and CentOS 7, and elsewhere.

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Self-documentation of code

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Development

The inadequacy or lack of documentation of software is a recurring issue. This applies just as often to proprietary software as it does to free software. Documentation of code has two main purposes: to make the code readable for other programmers, and to make the code useable. Good documentation of free software is vital for users, and contributing to the documentation (or translation to a minority language) of a free software project is a good way to get involved for those who don’t know where to start, or how to program, and want to know how it’s done. The problem is a shortage of recruits.

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JIT Support Is Closer To Landing For GCC

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Development
GNU

Since last year there's been an initiative for an embeddable GCC JIT compiler and ambitions to mainline the JIT support with LLVM long having been promoted for its Just-In-Time compilation abilities. Now with new patches, GCC JIT is a step closer to being mainlined.

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Google Announces 2014-2015 Dates for Student Centered Open Source Code Programs

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Development
Google
OSS

AH Google Logo Colored 1.6Each year Google facilitates contests and mentorships to help students from all over the world gain valuable experience in the field of open source code development. Google has recently revealed some of the information regarding their upcoming Code-In and Summer of Code events. The Code-In will begin this upcoming December and last until mid- January. The Summer of Code will begin in May of 2015 and last until August. According to their official statement regarding these programs, Google states that “we are passionate about introducing students to open source software development. Since 2005, the Open Source Programs team at Google has worked with over 10,000 students and over 485 open source projects in a variety of fields to create more code for us all.”

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Cutelyst 0.4.0 is out!

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Development
KDE

This is yet another big step for Cutelyst, this release bring several important fixes to the last version, and stabilizes the API a bit more. So far I have successfully deployed 3 commercial applications build on top of Cutelyst + Grantlee5, and the result is great.

If you don’t know Cutelyst yet it’s a Web Framework allowing you to build web applications using Qt, for more info check (this blog and) our website/wiki which is still work in progress: http://cutelyst.org or join #cutelyst on freenode

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My very first commit to KDE

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Development
KDE

After helping with a recent local KDE translation sprint, Andrej Mernik suggested that I should ask for direct commit access to the KDE localisations SVN, so I do not bug him or Andrej Vernekar to commit translations for me.

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How I Accidentally Became an Android Developer

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Android
Development
Mac

My name is Tom, and I’m Buffer’s Android developer, though you might be surprised to learn that before Buffer I had very little experience developing for Android.

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Packages for Builder — a GNOME IDE — now available for Fedora 21

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Development
GNOME

Builder is an in-development IDE that we reported on a few months ago as part of our GUADEC coverage. Builder aims to be an IDE that will focus purely on GNOME applications, with a goal of making it “Dead Simple”. The lead Builder developer Christian Hergert recently reported on his blog that there are now Fedora 21 COPR builds of the Builder master available for use and testing.

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More in Tux Machines

Debian Development and News

  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, June 2018
    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.
  • PKCS#11 v2.20
    By way of experiment, I've just enabled the PKCS#11 v2.20 implementation in the eID packages for Linux, but for now only in the packages in the "continuous" repository. In the past, enabling this has caused issues; there have been a few cases where Firefox would deadlock when PKCS#11 v2.20 was enabled, rather than the (very old and outdated) v2.11 version that we support by default. We believe we have identified and fixed all outstanding issues that caused such deadlocks, but it's difficult to be sure.
  • Plans for DebCamp and DebConf 18
    I recently became an active contributor to the Debian project, which has been consolidated throughout my GSoC project. In addition to the great learning with my mentors, Lucas Kanashiro and Raphäel Hertzog, the feedback from other community members has been very valuable to the progress we are making in the Distro Tracker. Tomorrow, thanks to Debian project sponsorship, I will take off for Hsinchu, Taiwan to attend DebCamp and DebConf18. It is my first DebConf and I’m looking forward to meeting new people from the Debian community, learn a lot and make useful contributions during the time I am there.
  • Building Debian packages in CI (ick)
    I develop a number of (fairly small) programs, as a hobby. Some of them I also maintain as packages in Debian. All of them I publish as Debian packages in my own APT repository. I want to make the process for making a release of any of my programs as easy and automated as possible, and that includes building Debian packages and uploading them to my personal APT repository, and to Debian itself.
  • My DebCamp/DebConf 18 plans
    Tomorrow I am going to another DebCamp and DebConf; this time at Hsinchu, Taiwan.
  • Things you can do with Debian: multimedia editing
    The Debian operating system serves many purposes and you can do amazing things with it. Apart of powering the servers behind big internet sites like Wikipedia and others, you can use Debian in your PC or laptop. I’ve been doing that for many years. One of the great things you can do is some multimedia editing. It turns out I love nature, outdoor sports and adventures, and I usually take videos and photos with my friends while doing such activities. And when I arrive home I love editing them for my other blog, or putting them together in a video.

32-Bit Vs. 64-Bit Operating System

This has really been confusing to some people choosing between 32-bit and 64-bit systems. Head over to any operating system’s website, you will be given a choice to download either versions of the same operating system. So what is the difference? Why do we have two different versions of the same OS? Let us solve this mystery here, once and for all. Read more

Convert video using Handbrake

Recently, when my son asked me to digitally convert some old DVDs of his high school basketball games, I immediately knew I would use Handbrake. It is an open source package that has all the tools necessary to easily convert video into formats that can be played on MacOS, Windows, Linux, iOS, Android, and other platforms. Handbrake is open source and distributable under the GPLv2 license. It's easy to install on MacOS, Windows, and Linux, including both Fedora and Ubuntu. In Linux, once it's installed, it can be launched from the command line with $ handbrake or selected from the graphical user interface. (In my case, that is GNOME 3.) Read more

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