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Development

Git 2.9 Version Control System Gets Its First Point Release with 28 Improvements

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Development

Coming approximately one month since the launch of the massive Git 2.9 update, the first point release in the series, Git 2.9.1, is now available for download on all supported platforms.

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Development News

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Development
  • [Pulp] Sprint Demo 4 — July 7, 2016
  • 10 Biggest Mistakes in Using Static Analysis

    Static analysis was introduced to the software engineering process for many important reasons. Developers use static analysis tools as part of the development and component testing process. The key aspect of static analysis is that the code (or another artifact) is not executed or run, but the tool itself is executed, and the input data to the tool provides us with the source code we are interested in. Static analysis started with compilers and derived technologies that are well established in the software development world. Each technology applicable for static analysis can choose between several alternatives, set up its own rules, and benefit from using them. What is most surprising to me is that even with a huge set of tools and possibilities, static analysis is not properly used and disregarded in most projects.

  • LiveCode Ltd.'s LiveCode

    The new features in LiveCode 8 are intended to empower a new audience of app makers. Some of these include nine pre-made widgets, 46 new extensions, the all new LiveCode Builder language, a 3.5x performance boost, Script Only stacks for better version control and working in teams, LiveCode for HTML5 and a new Feature Exchange for community funding of new features, among others.

FFmpeg 3.1 "Laplace" Open-Source Multimedia Framework Gets First Point Release

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Development

The FFmpeg development team have announced recently the release of the first maintenance update for the FFmpeg 3.1 "Laplace" series of the popular open-source and cross-platform multimedia framework.

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Software development kit from Lumenera supports Linux ARM-based processors

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Development
Linux

With the Linux SDK 2.1, USB 3.0 cameras from Lumenera now support Ubunti Linux, as it is used globally because of its versatility, reliability, and extensive developer libraries. Ubuntu has regular Long Term Support releases that are supported for five years, making it an ideal choice for developers. Cameras supported with this release include the Lt225, Lt425, Lt365R, Lt665R, Lt965R, Lt1265R, Lt16059H cameras, as well as the soon-to-be released Lt29059. It also supports Ubuntu versions 14.04.03, 14.04.04 and 12.04.05) on 32 and 64-bit x86 platforms and has the same common API call format as Lumenera’s Windows SDK and Linux 2.0 SDK for easy migration between platforms.

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LWN Series on Python

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Development
  • Twisted in an asyncio world
  • Pyjion
  • Automated testing of CPython patches
  • Why is Python slow?

    Python users often complain that the language is slow. Kevin Modzelewski presented some of his findings on Python's slowness at the 2016 Python Language Summit. He works at Dropbox on the Pyston just-in-time (JIT) compiled version of Python; that project has learned some interesting things along the way about what causes Python to be slow.

  • The Python JITs are coming

    Nathaniel Smith envisions a future where just-in-time (JIT) compiler techniques will be commonly used in Python, especially for scientific computing. He presented his ideas on where things are headed at the 2016 Python Language Summit. He currently works at the University of California, Berkeley on NumPy and other scientific Python projects. Part of what he has been doing is "working on the big picture of what JITs will mean for scientific computing".

Mageia 6 Is Getting Closer to a Final Release, Could Ship with Linux Kernel 4.7

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Development

The Mageia development team announced just a few moments ago that they'd released the first stabilization snapshot (sta1) of the upcoming Mageia 6 Linux operating system.

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Also: Mageia 6 "Sta1" Release Ships, Finally Switches To GRUB2

Development News

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Development
  • PHP 7.1 Alpha 2 Released

    Succeeding the PHP 7.1 Alpha release that happened earlier this month is now the second alpha build of this significant update to the PHP programming language.

  • 4 languages poised to out-Python Python

    Nothing lasts forever -- including programming languages. What seems like the future of computing today may be tomorrow's footnote, whether deserved or undeserved.

    Python, currently riding high on the list of languages to know, seems like a candidate for near-immortality at this point. But other languages are showing that they share Python's strengths: convenient to program in, decked out with powerful ways to perform math and science work, arrayed with a huge number of convenient third-party libraries.

  • ECMAScript 2016: The Latest Version Of JavaScript Language Has Arrived

The heartbeat of open source projects can be heard with GitHub data

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Development
OSS

GitHub released charts last week that tell a story about the heartbeat of a few open source, giving insights into activity, productivity and collaboration of software development.

Why are these important? Enterprises increasingly define software development as a top priority to gain competitive advantage or defend against disruption. They often turn to open source software because it is fast and agile. Enterprise IT decision makers should understand GitHub because it is the backbone of most open source projects.

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D language, JavaScript

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Development

Flatpak Officially Released for Next-Generation, Standalone GNU/Linux Apps

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Development
GNU
Linux

Softpedia has been informed by GNOME Project's Allan Day about the official unveiling and general availability of the Flatpak project for various GNU/Linux operating systems.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Microsoft and Linux

GNOME News

  • gnome-boxes: Coder’s log
    So another two weeks have passed and it’s time to sum things up and reflect a little on the struggles and accomplishments that have marked this time period, which was quite a bumpy ride compared to the others, but definitely more exciting.
  • GNOME Keysign 0.6
    It’s been a while since I reported on GNOME Keysign. The last few releases have been exciting, because they introduced nice features which I have been waiting long for getting around to implement them.
  • Testing for Usability
    I recently came across a copy of Web Redesign 2.0: Workflow That Works (book, 2005) by Goto and Cotler. The book includes a chapter on "Testing for Usability" which is brief but informative. The authors comment that many websites are redesigned because customers want to add new feature or want to drive more traffic to the website. But they rarely ask the important questions: "How easy is it to use our website?" "How easily can visitors get to the information they want and need?" and "How easily does the website 'lead' visitors to do what you want them to do?" (That last question is interesting for certain markets, for example.)

SUSE Leftovers

  • Newest Tumbleweed snapshot updates KDE Applications
    The latest openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshot has updated KDE Applications in the repositories to version 16.04.3. Snapshot 20160724 had a considerably large amount of package updates for Tumbleweed KDE users, but other updates in the snapshot included updates to kiwi-config-openSUSE, Libzypp to version 16.1.3, yast2-installation to version 3.1.202 and Kernel-firmware to 2016071
  • Highlights of YaST development sprint 22
    openSUSE Conference’16, Hackweek 14 and the various SUSE internal workshops are over. So it’s time for the YaST team to go back to usual three-weeks-long development sprints… and with new sprints come new public reports! With Leap 42.2 in Alpha phase and SLE12-SP2 in Beta phase our focus is on bugs fixing, so we don’t have as much fancy stuff to show in this report. Still, here you are some bits you could find interesting.