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Development

Choosing Software to Work Remotely from Your Linux Dev Station

Filed under
Development
GNU
Linux
HowTos

In the previous article, I gave an overview of how I've managed to go mobile. In this installment, I'm going to talk about the software I'm using on my different devices. Then in the third and final installment, I'll explain how I set up my Linux servers, what software I'm using, and how I set up the security. Before getting started, however, I want to address one important point: While downtime and family time are necessary (as some of you wisely pointed out in the comments!) one great use for this is if you have to do a lot of business traveling, and if you're on call. So continuing our story...

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Qt Creator 3.4 RC1 released

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Development
KDE

We are happy to announce the release of Qt Creator 3.4 RC1 today.

I already described many of the new features in the beta blog post. Since then, we fixed many bugs, including a whole lot of debugger integration issues, and generally polished Qt Creator for release. You find the more complete change log at code.qt.io.

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Clonezilla Live 2.4.0-7 Released to Fix a Btrfs Issue, Based on Debian Sid

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Development

Steven Shiau has released a new development version of his Clonezilla Live operating system aimed at system administrators who want an easy-to-use, portable, and straightforward solution for cloning disk drives.

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Linux Mint Developers Launched a New Project Called mint-dev-tools

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Development

Not only are the Linux Mint developers working on the operating systems, they are also making sure that third-party developers have a say in their project as well. That is why they have started to work on a new project called "mint-dev-tools," which is aimed specifically at devs, as the name implies.

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GNOME Builder Makes It Easier for Developers to Create Apps for GNOME 3.16

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Development
GNOME

On March 26, we announced the release of the GNOME 3.16 desktop environment, and we unveiled its awesome features, including updated and new applications. However, we completely missed one app: GNOME Builder, a powerful IDE (Integrated Development Environment) for GNOME.

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It's Now Easier To Try PHP 7 On Fedora & RHEL

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Development
Red Hat
Software

For those interested in PHP 7, it's now easier to try out the development version of the next-generation PHP on Fedora and Red Hat Enterprise Linux based operating systems.

It's already easy to build PHP (7) on most any supported platform, but for those interested in RPMs and Yum'ing, there's now pre-built packages of PHP7 in its current development state. Remi Collet who often handles the PHP packages for Fedora, has put out an experimental package collection containing the early PHP7 packages.

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KWinception

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Development
KDE

Last week I merged in a few important changes for the upcoming KWin 5.3 release. The rootless Xwayland support is integrated, which means we are a huge step closer to managing Wayland clients. Rendering, input and cursor is already using the Wayland code paths and will be shared with proper Wayland clients. I have already started working on code for that and have it working quite nicely already but decided to delay the integration for Plasma 5.4.

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More Qt/KDE development: Cutelyst 0.7.0 is out and now has a tutorial!

Writing QML based apps, the KDE way

GTK+ 3.16.0 Arrives with Overlay Scrollbars, OpenGL Support, Experimental Mir Backend

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Development
GNOME

The GNOME development team, through Matthias Clasen, has the pleasure of announcing the immediate availability for download of GTK+ 3.16.0, a powerful, open-source and cross-platform toolkit used in the GNOME 3.16 desktop environment for creating graphical user interfaces.

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The Demise of Open Source Hosting Providers Codehaus and Google Code

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Development
OSS

At the turn of the millenium, a new breed of open-source hosting platforms was created to provide free hosting for open-source projects. The inaugral hosting service was SourceForge, created by VA Linux as a means to host open-source projects in 1999, to support their VA Linux product created in 1993. The repository provided a location for developers to host code (with CVS), have an issue tracking system, mailing lists and hosting for download purposes. By the end of 2001, over 30,000 projects were hosted on SourceForge. By 2006 the number of projects had grown to 100k, and adding Google Ads provided a means of income to support the hosting site. 2006 also saw Subversion being added to the platform.

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PHP 7 Set to Dramatically Acclerate PHP Performance

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Development

According to the data, running drupal 7.27 on PHP 7 is 4.23 percent faster than running it on HHVM, that number rises to 25 percent faster for those running earlier builds of the in-development Drupal 8 release.

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More in Tux Machines

What Your CIO Needs to Know About Open Source

Today’s businesses are becoming increasingly familiar with the many benefits of open source software. In fact, 74 percent of IT professionals, in the U.S. alone, agree that the software offers better quality of continuity and control than that of proprietary. However, some CIOs are still skeptical about adopting open source software into their IT infrastructure as they’ve grown accustomed to their proprietary software vendors. Read more

Elementary OS Freya 0.3 review

Elementary OS is a Linux desktop distribution that’s being primed as a “fast and open replacement for Windows and OS X.” It’s safe to say that that’s the goal of every Linux distribution. Some distributions have, to a large extent, succeeded, while some are partially or completely misguided. Elementary OS, even though it’s still just at version 0.3, belongs to the first group. Some of the design decisions make it slightly painful to use, but as a unit, the distribution is moving in the right direction. Will it ever get to the point where it replaces Windows and OS X for all users? No, because there’ll always be those that love Windows and Mac OS X no matter what. And there are still applications that have no real alternatives in Linux. Read more

Evolving KDE: Lehman’s Laws of Software Evolution In The Community

The board of KDE eV has launched a new initiative to ensure that KDE remains awesome and relevant for the foreseeable future. Unlike previous approaches it is not a point-in-time solution, it is a continuous process of improvement. And it is a good thing. Previously, I have written/spoken a lot about the role of Brooks’ Law in the context of Free Software. Brooks’ Law teaches us to be careful about the management of growth in our communities. Especially treated in consideration with the grossly under appreciated Conway’s Law. There are, of course, other laws of Software Engineering that apply to Free Software development. Read more