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You have GNU sense of humor! Glibc abortion 'joke' diff tiff leaves Richard Stallman miffed

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Development
GNU

Late last month, open-source contributor Raymond Nicholson proposed a change to the manual for glibc, the GNU implementation of the C programming language's standard library, to remove "the abortion joke," which accompanied the explanation of libc's abort() function.

Nicholson said: "The joke does not provide any useful information about the abort() function so removing it will not hinder use of glibc."

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Programming: HHVM 3.26 and Qt 5.11

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Development
  • HHVM 3.26 - Introducing HackC

    HHVM 3.26 is released! Highlights include a new frontend, relicensing of the typechecker and related tools and libraries to MIT, and support for Ubuntu 18.04. Packages have been published in the usual places.

  • HHVM 3.26 Released With New HackC Compiler Front-End

    The Facebook developers working on the HHVM interpreter for PHP/Hack have announced the major v3.26 update.

    HHVM 3.26 is a major release in that it now uses the HackC compiler front-end by default. HackC offers a full-fidelity parser and bytecode emitter for both Hack and PHP languages. HHVM developers are planning to drop their legacy front-end to HHVM in their next release (v3.27).

  • Compressed Textures in Qt 5.11

    As modern user interfaces become ever more graphics intensive, the demands on graphics memory to hold the textures increase. This is particularly relevant for embedded systems, where resources come at a higher premium, and can be a challenge for system performance. One of the key remedies for this is to reduce the memory requirements of the graphics assets.

  • Qt 5.11 Adding Khronos KTX Texture Support To Qt Quick

    Of the many features coming in the soon-to-be-released Qt 5.11 is better support for compressed textures with Qt Quick.

LLVM and GNU Compilers: Glow and GCC 9

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Development
GNU
BSD
  • Thank you from the Glow Developers

    Hello LLVM community,

    We have been working hard on a new domain specific optimizing compiler, and we are pleased to announce that we have recently open sourced the project!  We would like to introduce you to Glow, an optimizing compiler for neural networks!

  • Glow: An LLVM Optimizing Compiler For Neural Networks

    The latest interesting use of the LLVM compiler infrastructure stack is for Glow, a machine learning / neural network optimizing compiler.

    Glow is intended to be used by high-level machine learning frameworks and it in turn -- via leveraging LLVM -- will generate optimized code for different hardware targets.

  • GCC 9.0 Sees A Number Of BRIG Improvements For HSA

    Being very early in the GCC 9.0 development cycle following the GCC 8 stable release earlier this week, a number of BRIG front-end improvements have landed. BRIG as a reminder is the binary form for HSA IL.

    In January of 2017 is when the GCC BRIG support landed in time for GCC 7. With the GCC 8 release there are some BRIG improvements for this compiler's HSA support, but nothing really too notable. Sadly, since this code has been merged, I haven't heard of any major users of this code intended for supporting HSA accelerators with AMD seemingly divesting in HSA.

Development and Programs: Eclipse, Python, MCC DAQ, Filemanager, Cloud Commander

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Development
Software
  • Eclipse Che’s Plans for 2018

    2018 has been a busy year already, and we’re not even halfway through.  Eclipse Che 6 brought team and enterprise features including multi-user and multi-tenancy as well as a large number of other great capabilities (you can read all about it in our Che 6 release post).

  • Best Free Python Visualization Packages

    Python is a very popular general purpose programming language — with good reason. It’s object oriented, semantically structured, extremely versatile, and well supported. Programmers and data scientists favour Python because it’s easy to use and learn, offers a good set of built-in features, and is highly extensible. Python’s readability makes it an excellent first programming language.

    Data visualization is an important method of exploring data and sharing results with others. When it comes to this field, Python is rubbing shoulders with R as the language of choice. Unfortunately, Python’s visualization landscape is pretty difficult to fathom without some serious digging. In part, this is because there are so many good open source Python visualization libraries available. Some of the packages are suitable for any field, others excel at a specific task.

  • New Linux® Support from Measurement Computing

    Measurement Computing Corporation (MCC) today announced the release of Universal Library (UL) for Linux, a programming library for use with MCC DAQ devices. Due to the strength and growth of the Linux community, the need for open-source DAQ solutions has increased. Th

  • Filemanager – A Cross-platform Stylish Web File Manager

    Today, we will be discussing about an useful application called “filemanager”. It provides a file managing interface within a specified directory or you can assign your own directory. You can use it as the way you use your local file manager. The only difference we use it from the web browser.

  • Cloud Commander – A Web File Manager With Console And Editor

    Cloud commander is a web-based file manager application that allows you to view, access, and manage the files and folders of your system from any computer, mobile, and tablet Pc via a web browser. It has two simple and classic panels, and automatically converts it’s size as per your device’s display size. It also has two built-in editors namely Dword and Edward with support of Syntax-highlighting and one Console with support of your system’s command line. So you can edit your files on the go. Cloud Commander server is a cross-platform application that runs on Linux, Windows and Mac OS X operating systems, and the client will run on any web browser. It is written using JavaScript/Node.Js, and is licensed under MIT.

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Programming: Turing Test 2, A Test of Knowledge, and Python2/Python3

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Development
  • Turing Test 2

    In this modern era, in which the Internet and the World Wide Web play such visible roles, a different problem arises. In this version, which I will call "Turing Test 2," a computer program undertakes textual interactions with a human and another computer. The task of the computer program is to distinguish between the human and the computer. If the computer program successfully identifies which correspondent is a human and which is a computer, it has successfully passed Turing Test 2. If it cannot, then it fails the test. One particular form of this test is called a CAPTCHAb (Completely Automated Public Turing test to tell Computers and Humans Apart). These tests take many forms, but a popular variation is to display a distorted image of a word or random string of numbers and characters. In theory, a human interacting with the CAPTCHA will successfully respond with the correct alphanumeric string while a computer program, interacting with the same image will not succeed. There are other variations, for example, in which an image of an equation is displayed and the solution to the equation must be entered in response. Assuming the image is just a set of pixels, the challenge for the computer program trying to appear human is to correctly identify the equation and solve it.

  • A Test of Knowledge

    Software development is often described as knowledge work. This label is invariably used as a shorthand for “work that doesn’t involve getting your hands dirty”, “jobs your parents never had and you struggle to explain to them” or, without any apparent irony over the use of fingers on keyboards and screens, “the digital economy”. But step back from these simple substitutions and an obvious yet deeper truth becomes visible: knowledge work is about knowledge. It’s about knowing stuff and, most often, also about how you deal with stuff you don’t know.

  • A personal python milestone

    Today I migrated the script from Python2 and yum to Python3 and dnf. First of all kudos to Seth Vidal, and secondly, kudos to the dnf team for putting together a worthy successor to yum, and more importantly, usable documentation of same.

Programming Leftovers

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Development
  • Building a data pipeline with testing in mind

    If you've built batch data pipelines, but didn't know the best way to check their health or test changes for potential regressions, this article is for you.

    Monitoring and testing batch data pipelines require a different approach from monitoring and testing web services. It's one thing to build a robust data-pipeline process in Python but an entirely different challenge to find tooling and build out the framework that provides confidence that a data system is healthy. To truly iterate and develop a codebase, developers must be able to test confidently during the development process and to monitor the production system. This article offers some solutions to monitoring and configuring alerts on data pipelines.

  • What makes a great SRE?

    In January 2018, digital experience monitoring firm Catchpoint conducted a survey of 416 professionals with the title or responsibilities of a Site Reliability Engineer (SRE). The goal of the survey was to find out what it really means to be an SRE, examining the types of organizations, skills, and culture that exist where site reliability engineers work.

  • This Week in Rust 232
  • These Weeks In Servo 111

    In the last few weeks, we merged 190 PRs in the Servo organization’s repositories.

  • Typemock Launches C/C++ Mocking Framework for Linux

    Typemock, the leader in unit testing solutions, today announced the launch of Isolator++ for Linux. For over a decade, Typemock has been the smart way for developers to unit test .NET and C/C++ on Windows, and with this new release, developers will be able to easily unit test their code on Linux as well.  

New Programming and Skills Surveys

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Development
  • New Report from The Linux Foundation Shows Demand High for DevOps Skills

    A growing number of companies are looking for full-time hires; 60% in 2017 versus 53% in 2016, but only 43% of hiring managers in 2017 report the economy is encouraging them to hire more, down from 57% in the previous year.

    42% of companies are keen on adding DevOps skills to their hiring portfolio, with 50% of hiring managers more likely to hire a certified professional. 47% of companies will help pay for employees' certifications, representing an increase from from one-third a year ago. Only 21% say they definitely would not pay for certifications (down from 30% in 2016). 33% of managers report they have offered additional training and/or certification opportunities as an incentive to retain employees, up from 26% last year. 76% of open source professionals say certifications are useful to their careers.

  • By the numbers: Python community trends in 2017/2018

    Python is rapidly growing in popularity and drawing more attention in tech news, including reports about Python being used involve more high school girls in computer engineering and a recommendation that intro-level college computing classes teach the programming language. Additionally, Stack Overflow's 2018 developer survey found Python is the programming language the most people want to learn. Python is seen and used across the web, from simple personal websites to data mining and machine learning at the world's largest banks.

    What makes Python so special? Who are Python developers? And why is it so popular? To answer these and many other important questions, JetBrains and the Python Software Foundation (PSF) partnered on a developer survey of people who use Python as a primary or supplementary language. Until now, there hasn't been a Python-specific study to learn how it is being used by diverse developers, what components complement its use, and what makes it one of the most loved languages.

Programming: GNU/Linux Development and Custom Android ROMs

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Android
Development
GNU
Linux
  • Create a Linux desktop application with Ruby

    Recently, while experimenting with GTK and its Ruby bindings, I decided to write a tutorial introducing this functionality. In this post, we will create a simple ToDo application (something like what we created with Ruby on Rails) using the gtk3 gem (a.k.a. the GTK+ Ruby bindings).

  • C# developer, Linux two of the fastest-growing search terms for Canadian tech job seekers

    A new report from Indeed Canada shows the fastest-growing search terms for tech job seekers in Canada.

  • The pain of installing custom ROMs on Android phones

    A while back I bought a Nexus 5x. During a three-day ordeal I finally got Omnirom installed - with full disk encryption, root access and some stitched together fake Google Play code that allowed me to run Signal without actually letting Google into my computer.

    A short while later, Open Whisper Systems released a version of Signal that uses Web Sockets when Google Play services is not installed (and allows for installation via a web page without the need for the Google Play store). Dang. Should have waited.

    Now, post Meltdown/Spectre, I worked up the courage to go through this process again. In the comments of my Omnirom post, I received a few suggestions about not really needing root. Hm - why didn't I think of that? Who needs root anyway? Combining root with full disk encryption was the real pain point in my previous install, so perhaps I can make things much easier. Also, not needing any of the fake Google software would be a definite plus.

    This time around I decided to go with LineageOS since it seems to be the most mainstream of the custom ROMs. I found perfectly reasonable sounding instructions.

Gitcoin ICO: Grow Open Source Software For Tips & Rewards?

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Development
OSS

Existing incentive open software are faced with various challenges. Some of them include the fact that open source software developers create a lot of economic value, however, this value is not well incentivized. The repo maintainer is faced with the challenge of taming while the contributor has the monetization challenge. The job hunter, on the other hand, is faced with the prioritization problem.

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Free Software Development and Howtos

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HowTos
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Ryzen 7 2700 / Ryzen 7 2700X / Core i7 8700K Linux Gaming Performance With RX Vega 64, GTX 1080 Ti

With the Linux benchmarks of the Ryzen 7 2700 last week I included a few Linux gaming benchmarks, but for those evaluating CPU options for your next Intel/AMD Linux gaming system upgrade, here is a much more thorough set of benchmarks from a wide variety of OpenGL and Vulkan powered Linux games. The Ryzen 7 2700, Ryzen 7 2700X, and Core i7 8700K processors were tested for this Ubuntu gaming comparison while testing with both a Radeon RX Vega 64 and GeForce GTX 1080 Ti. Read more

Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie" Will Reach End of Security Support on June 17, 2018

According to a security advisory posted by developer Moritz Muehlenhoff on the Debian-security-announce mailing list, the Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie" operating system series will no longer receive regular security updates as of June 17, 2018. However, a limited number of packages will still be updated for a while. "This is an advance notice that regular security support for Debian GNU/Linux 8 (code name "jessie") will be terminated on the 17th of June," said Moritz Muehlenhoff. "As with previous releases additional LTS support will be provided for a reduced set of architectures and packages." Read more

Parrot 4.0 Ethical Hacking OS Debuts with MD Raid Support, Stable Sandboxed Apps

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Linux Foundation LFCE: Hugues Clouâtre

I started using Linux and open source software professionally at the beginning of my IT career while attending university. I found the simplicity and flexibility of Linux quite interesting, especially compared to the mainstream operating systems at that time (2004). Red Hat and Debian were the first Linux distributions I used in a business environment. Linux gives you the freedom to experiment -- it got me interested right away. Read more