Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Development

PyKDE5 Status

Filed under
Development
KDE

Also note that only Python 3 is supported. It doesn't make sense to support legacy Python versions like 2, especially when developers need to do a port anyway from PyKDE4 to PyKDE5.

Another important reason is that it costs more time and effort to support more configurations. It is no secret to anyone who has followed PyKDE4 development and support just a little bit, will have noticed that my time for KDE is very limited. The situation isn't likely to improve, in fact in a couple months it should get worse if all goes to plan. Smile I see that some people have stepped in to fill the void and fix some of the build and installation problems they have encountered (hi Luca!). This is great and I encourage people to get involved where possible. The hardest part is getting a working dev environment set up, deep C++ knowledge isn't really needed (I certainly don't have deep C++ knowledge!).

Read more

What Immigration did with just $1m and open source software

Filed under
Development
OSS

The Department of Immigration has showed what a cash-strapped government agency can do with just $1 million, some open source software, and a bit of free thinking.

Speaking at the Technology in Government forum in Canberra yesterday, the Department's chief risk officer Gavin McCairns explained how his team rolled an application based on the 'R' language into production to filter through millions of incoming visitors to Australia every year.

Read more

Digia spins Qt unit as a separate company

Filed under
Development
KDE

As the adoption of Qt is increasing in commercial as well as Open Source projects the company behind the project, Digia, has decided to spin Qt unit as a new company.

Digia has been facing a resource challenge with Qt as 75% of the contribution comes from Digia employees. Qt has dual presence one at qt.digia.com and one at qt.project.com and these two sites or two entities have drifted apart instead of coming closer. Now what is the difference between the two? Same as with any open source project and commercial product. qt.digia.com is all about commercial offering whereas qr-project is all about the community.

Read more

More Details On GCC & LLVM Collaboration

Filed under
Development
GNU
BSD

Last month in Cambridge was the 2014 GNU Tools Cauldron where GCC as a JIT compiler and other interesting topics were discussed by developers. One of the topics discussed was surrounding better collaboration between GCC and LLVM developers.

While in my earlier 2014 GNU Tools Cauldron coverage I commented on the session about GCC+LLVM collaboration, after the past Phoronix article on the event some additional information was published. The purpose of the GCC and LLVM/Clang compiler teams collaborating is to reach common defaults between compilers, avoid confusion with architecture flags and other compiler switches, and make other improvements to better the interoperability between the compilers to make a better end-user/developer experience. The focus isn't on merging GCC+LLVM, debating licensing differences, fighting over who as the faster compiler, or other such heated topics.

Read more

Web app dev kit supports Android and Ubuntu

Filed under
Android
Development
Linux
Ubuntu

Toshiba Electronics has introduced two starter kits for early development of web applications using the Toshiba TZ5000 Application Processor Lite (ApP Lite) series.

The RBTZ5000-2MA-A1 and RBTZ5000-6MA-A1 starter kits provide drivers for internet applications using HTML5.

Both kits provide drivers for video playback using Wireless LAN and HDMI output, with the RBTZ5000-2MA-A1 on Ubuntu Linux, and the RBTZ5000-6MA-A1 on an Android 4.4 platform.

Read more

Group Test: Linux Text Editors

Filed under
Development
Software

If you’ve been using Linux long, you know that whether you want to edit an app’s configuration file, hack together a shell script, or write/review bits of code, the likes of LibreOffice just won’t cut it. Although the words mean almost the same thing, you don’t need a word processor for these tasks; you need a text editor.

In this group test we’ll be looking at five humble text editors that are more than capable of heavy-lifting texting duties. They can highlight syntax and auto-indent code just as effortlessly as they can spellcheck documents. You can use them to record macros and manage code snippets just as easily as you can copy/paste plain text.

Read more

WebKitGTK+ 2.5.1: Good bye WebKit1

Filed under
Development
GNOME
Web

WebKitGTK+ 2.5.1 is the first version of this release cycle. It comes very late mainly due to the regressions introduced by the switch to CMake and the problems we found after removing WebKit1 from the tree. It also includes some new features that I’ll talk about in other posts, probably when 2.6.0 is released. In this post I’ll only focus on the breaks introduced in this release, in order to help everybody to adapt their applications to the API changes if needed...

Read more

Evince Hackfest

Filed under
Development
GNOME

This was a GSoC project of 2013, but the patch provided by the student was never in an “upstreamable” state. Again Germán, who always loved this feature, took care of the patch addressing my review comments. At the beginning of the hackfest most of the work has already been done, we only needed a few more review iterations during the hackfest to finally push this feature to master. The idea is to show the list of recent documents as an icon view with thumbnails and documents metadata. This view is loaded when evince is launched without any document replacing the useless empty window we had before. It also replaces the recent documents submenu in the gear menu.

Read more

GSoC: Open Source Event Manager Organizer Dashboard

Filed under
Development
Google
SUSE

In the past 4 months during this years Google Summer of Code (GSoC), a global program that offers student developers stipends to write code for open source software projects, Christian Bruckmayer collaborated with other students and mentors to code a dashboard for the Open Source Event Manager (OSEM). In this series of three posts Christian will tell you about his project and what he has learned from this experience.

Read more

GCC As A Just-In Time Compiler Is An Interesting Project

Filed under
Development
GNU

Aside from the experimental "Coconut" as a Python JIT compiler using GCC's new Just-In Time capabilities, the libgccjit.so shared library isn't yet depended upon in the real-world but the JIT compilation abilities are being built upon for hopeful incorporation into the GNU Compiler Collection.

Going back to October of 2013 has been work on this GCC-based embeddable JIT compiler that initially generated a lot of interest but has yet to be incorporated into a stable GNU Compiler Collection release.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

The top 14 hidden features in Windows, iOS, and Android

You may think you're a high-tech power user who knows all the nooks and crannies of Windows, iOS, and Android, but let's be realistic: There could be at least a few undocumented (or poorly documented) commands, control panels, and apps that have slipped by you—maybe more than a few. We've dived deep into each OS to uncover the best hidden tips and tricks that can make you more productive—or make common tasks easier. Got a favorite undocumented tip to share with readers? Add them in the comments section at the end of the article. Read more

Android-on-ARM mini-PC draws less than 7W

The DSA2LS runs a pre-installed Android 4.2.2 (Jelly Bean) with integrated online or offline update functionality on a dual-core, 1GHz Freescale i.MX6 DualLite system-on-chip. The SoC has a Vivante GC880 GPU that’s not as powerful as the Vivante GC2000 GPU found on the Dual and Quad i.MX6 models, but it still plays back 1080p video and offers 3D graphics acceleration. The power-sipping DualLite enables the fanless computer to run at a modest 6.26W active and 1.42W standby, according to Shuttle’s AnTuTu benchmarks. Read more

today's howtos

Leftovers: Software