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Programming Leftovers

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Development
  • Top 10 Natural Language Processing Tools For Today's Demand
  • The Rust Programming Language Blog: Call for 2021 Roadmap Blogs Ending Soon

    We will be closing the collection of blog posts on October 5th. As a reminder, we plan to close the survey on September 24th, later this week.

  • Python Practice Problems: Get Ready for Your Next Interview

    Are you a Python developer brushing up on your skills before an interview? If so, then this tutorial will usher you through a series of Python practice problems meant to simulate common coding test scenarios. After you develop your own solutions, you’ll walk through the Real Python team’s answers so you can optimize your code, impress your interviewer, and land your dream job!

  • Learn to Code Free — Our Interactive Courses Are ALL Free This Week!

    Exciting news: for the next week, all courses are free. Yup, every single course in every learning path is free from Sept 21-28.

    This free week includes all of our courses in R, Python, SQL, machine learning, Git, the command line, and much more!

    Even more exciting: complete at least one mission during this week and you'll unlock an additional prize: a downloadable data science career resources pack sent to your email!

    Now, it’s easier than ever to go from total beginner to job-qualified using Dataquest. The paywall is down!

  • Molfile "S SKP"

    In the last couple of essays I described some of the parts of a SDF record then pointed out some of the ways to break simple SDF record tokenizers. In this essay I'll point out an documentation curiosity which makes it even harder to parse a molfile with simple tools, though until I wrote this essay I had never seen it in actual use.

Oracle Solaris and Java Update

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OS
Development
  • Oracle Solaris: Update to the Continuous Delivery Model

    The Oracle Solaris 11 Operating System (OS) is synonymous with three words: consistent, reliable and secure. With Oracle Solaris OS being designed to deliver a consistent platform to run your enterprise applications, Oracle Solaris has become the most trusted solution for running both modern and legacy applications on the newest system hardware while providing the latest innovations. Oracle Solaris combines the power of industry standard security features, unique security and anti-malware capabilities, and compliance management tools for low risk application deployments and cloud infrastructure. In its most recent avatar, Oracle Solaris 11.4 has already provided our customers with the latest features and observability tools and the list of new features in build grows with every SRU release.

  • Oracle To Stick With Solaris "11.4" For Continuous Delivery SRU Releases

    With no new indications of Solaris 12 or Solaris 11.next and given the past layoffs and previous announcements from Oracle, today's statement that Solaris 11.4 will remain as their continuous delivery model with monthly SRU releases come as little surprise.

    Tanmay Dhuri who has been at Oracle since April as the Solaris product manager wrote today on the Oracle Solaris blog about their continuous delivery model. Basically it's reiterating that Solaris 11.4 will be sticking to a continuous delivery model moving forward. This comes after Solaris 11.4 turning two years old and seeing monthly SRU releases during that time. These monthly releases are designed to offer up timely security fixes and other mostly small updates to Oracle Solaris.

  • Java 15 Goes GA as the Language Turns 25

    Oracle today announced the general availability release of Java 15 during the opening keynote of its Developer Live conference, the online version of the company's annual CodeOne and OpenWorld events, underway this week.

    The latest Java Development Kit (JDK) delivers new functionality, preview features now finalized, incubating features in preview, the continued modernization of the existing code, and a host of bug fixes and the deprecation of outdated functionality.

    This release comes as Java turns 25, noted Georges Saab, vice president of development for Oracle's Java Platform Group, in a statement.

  • Solve a real-world problem using Java

    As I wrote in the first two articles in this series, I enjoy solving small problems by writing small programs in different languages, so I can compare the different ways they approach the solution. The example I'm using in this series is dividing bulk supplies into hampers of similar value to distribute to struggling neighbors in your community, which you can read about in the first article in this series.

    In the first article, I solved this problem using the Groovy programming language, which is like Python in many ways, but syntactically it's more like C and Java. In the second article, I solved it in Python with a very similar design and effort, which demonstrates the resemblance between the languages.

    Now I'll try it in Java.

Python Programming

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Development
  • Teach Python with the Mu editor

    Teaching kids to code is very popular in schools. Many years ago, in the days of the Apple II and Logo programming, I learned about turtle graphics. I enjoyed learning how to program the virtual turtle and later helping students to do the same.

    About five years ago, I learned about Python's turtle module, and it was the segue to my Python journey. Soon, I started using the turtle module to teach students Python programming basics, including using it to create interesting graphics.

    [...]

    In the early days of my Python adventure, I used IDLE, Python's integrated development environment. It was much easier than entering commands into the Python shell, plus I could write and save programs for later use. I took some online courses and read many excellent books about Python programming. I taught teachers and students how to create turtle graphics using IDLE.

  • Use this Python script to simulate Babbage's Difference Engine

    Charles Babbage (1791–1871) was an avid mathematician with very wide interests. He is well-known for envisioning the idea of computers and single-handedly developed what he called a Difference Engine to make serial calculations. It was a mechanical machine with a series of axles and gears to make calculations, with the output being a printed table. I recently began reading his 1864 book, Passages from the Life of a Philosopher, where he explains how the Difference Engines came to be.

    One of the problems his Engine was designed to solve relates to the idea of children playing with marbles and arranging them in a progressive pyramidal shape, with one marble in the top row, two in the second, three in the third, and so on. For small pyramids, you can simply count the marbles to find how many there are. But Babbage wanted to create an automatic list or table with one column showing the number of rows and another column showing the total number of marbles.

  • TDD in Python with pytest - Part 5

    This is the fifth and last post in the series "TDD in Python with pytest" where I develop a simple project following a strict TDD methodology. The posts come from my book Clean Architectures in Python and have been reviewed to get rid of some bad naming choices of the version published in the book.

  • PyDev of the Week: Jim Anderson

    This week we welcome Jim Anderson (@jimande75053775) as our PyDev of the Week! Jim is a contributing writer for Real Python.

    [...]

    I love to snowboard in the winter and I’m an avid bike commuter, though I’ll admit that sounds more impressive than it is – I only live 3 miles from work! I’ve got two grade-school aged daughters and a lovely wife, all of whom ski and give me grief for snowboarding.

    I’ve been lucky enough to get to program for a living since I was a kid, mainly on low-level and embedded software, with a couple of brief turns doing enterprise-level band-end code.

  • Test and Code: 131: Test Smarter, Not Harder

    Some people avoid writing tests. Some drudge through it painfully.
    There is a better way.

  • Replace Occurrences of a Substring in String with Python

    Replacing all or n occurrences of a substring in a given string is a fairly common problem of string manipulation and text processing in general. Luckily, most of these tasks are made easy in Python by its vast array of built-in functions, including this one.

  • PB Python Article Roadmap

    September 17th is Practical Business Python’s anniversary. Last year, I reflected on 5 years of growth. This year, I wanted to take a step back and develop a guide to guide readers through the content on PB Python.

    As of this writing, I have 84 articles on the site. They vary from fairly complex and lengthy to quick summaries. When I wrote them, I did it based on my interests at the time and without much thought on progression. Now that I have a decent volume of articles, I want to organize them in a more meaningful way.

    My ultimate goal for this site is that I want it to be a resource to help people use Python to automate away many of the repetitive tasks they do on a daily basis with tools like Excel. A secondary goal for is to cover more advanced Python topics that are difficult to do in Excel.

Programming Leftovers

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Development
  • Ned Batchelder: Scriv

    I’ve written a tool for managing changelog files, called scriv. It focuses on a simple workflow, but with lots of flexibility.

    I’ve long felt that it’s enormously beneficial for engineers to write about what they do, not only so that other people can understand it, but to help the engineers themselves understand it. Writing about a thing gives you another perspective on it, your own code included.

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: RcppSpdlog 0.0.2: New upstream, awesome new stopwatch

    Following up on the initial RcppSpdlog 0.0.1 release earlier this week, we are pumped to announce release 0.0.2. It contains upstream version 1.8.0 for spdlog which utilizes (among other things) a new feature in the embedded fmt library, namely completely automated formatting of high resolution time stamps which allows for gems like this (taken from this file in the package and edited down for brevity)...

  • [Perl] Week #078: Leader Element & Left Rotation

    First thing first, I managed to do video session for both tasks this week. It is so satisfying when everything goes as per the plan. For the last couple of weeks, I could only do one video session. One day, I would like to video with PIP. At the moment, I am little uncomfortable showing my face in the video. There is another reason why I can’t do it now. I don’t have my personal office in the house. I have been working from home since mid-March, nearly 6 months, sitting on sofa, 9-5. I must confess it is not easy. I miss my office chair and noise-free environment. I have 3 years twin girls. Luckily the school started last week, I get no-noise moment for few hours during the day. Also this week, I found time to do coding in Swift.

  • Searching Greek and Hebrew with regular expressions

    According to the Python Cookbook, “Mixing Unicode and regular expressions is often a good way to make your head explode.” It is thus with fear and trembling that I dip my toe into using Unicode with Greek and Hebrew.

    I heard recently that there are anomalies in the Hebrew Bible where the final form of a letter is deliberately used in the middle of a word. That made me think about searching for such anomalies with regular expressions. I’ll come back to that shortly, but I’ll start by looking at Greek where things are a little simpler.

  • Java 15 Gains Garbage Collection, Text Block Features

    Java 15 became generally available on Sept. 15, marking the second release in 2020 of the widely deployed programming language.

    The Java 15 release follows Java 14, which debuted in March, and is noteworthy for a number of improvements, as well as the fact that the release was not delayed due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Matthias Clasen: GtkColumnView

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Development
Red Hat
GNOME

One thing that I left unfinished in my recent series on list views and models in GTK 4 is a detailed look at GtkColumnView. This will easily be the most complicated part of the series. We are entering into the heartland of GtkTreeView—anything aiming to replace most its features will be a complicated beast.

Read more

Also: Oculus Rift CV1 progress

Programming and Hardware Hacking

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Development
  • Raspberry Pi inspired MaaxBoard Mini SBC features NXP i.MX 8M Mini SoC

    Last year, Embest – an Avnet company – introduced MaaXBoard NXP i.MX 8M SBC mostly compatible with Raspberry Pi form factor and running Android 9.0 or Yocto Linux.

  • Code a GUI live with Digital Making at Home
  • RenderDoc 1.10 Released For This Leading Cross-Platform Graphics Debugger

    RenderDoc 1.10 was released on Friday for this leading open-source program supporting frame-capture-based debugging on Vulkan, OpenGL / GLES, and Direct3D across Windows, Linux, and Android along with platforms like Stadia and the Nintendo Switch.

    RenderDoc 1.10 brings various optimizations and speed improvements, which is always nice to see. RenderDoc should now have lower idle overhead, greater performance when capturing a frame on Vulkan in certain instances, faster cold startup time, improved replay time when switching events for Vulkan captures, and other optimizations.

  • Sublime Text – Best text editor for Linux [Ed: Why promote dodgy proprietary software when better editors exist that are Free/libre?]

    In this guide, you will learn how to install Sublime Text editor on Linux distributions like Ubuntu, Mint, Fedora, Manjaro, etc.

    Sublime Text is a cross-platform, light-weight code editor. It natively supports many programming and markup languages. Its functions can be extended with plugins. It has many other features, some of them listed below.

  • GCC 11 Compiler Might Finally Enable DWARF 5 Debugging By Default

    For a number of years the GNU Compiler Collection has shipped experimental support for the DWARF 5 debugging data format while finally for next year's GCC 11 release it might be deemed stable and used by default.

    The DWARF 5 debug data format was published back in 2017 to succeed the now decade old DWARF Version 4. With DWARF 5 there is support for better data compression, various performance improvements, better debug handling around optimized code, and other enhancements over DWARF4. DWARF 5 itself was in development for a half-decade and is detailed at DWARFstd.org.

Python Programming

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Development
  • Tweet from Django application using Tweepy

    In this tutorial, we will learn how to post a tweet from Django application using Tweepy.

  • What are Dependencies in Programming

    This article is going to be a very informative read no matter what kind of programmer you are. In fact, even if you aren’t a programmer you will find this article useful. After all, dependencies is not just a programming concept. It’s a general term that has meaning even outside of Computer Science.

    [...]

    Dependency is a broad software engineering term used to refer when a piece of software relies on another one. Simply put, if Program A requires Program B to be able to run, Program A is dependent on Program B. This makes Program B a dependency of Program A.

    You may ask, why would Program A even need Program B, or any other program for that matter? This will be further elaborated in the “Why we use dependencies” section in this article, but a short version is that Program A requires a special service or feature which Program B has.

    It doesn’t really matter what it is, if your program needs to run correctly, it’s a dependency. Common examples of dependencies are programming libraries, Online services, programming scripts etc.

  • How to rename columns in Pandas Dataframe

    In this tutorial, we will cover various methods to rename columns in pandas dataframe in Python. Renaming or changing the names of columns is one of the most common data wrangling task. If you are not from programming background and worked only in Excel Spreadsheets in the past you might feel it not so easy doing this in Python as you can easily rename columns in MS Excel by just typing in the cell what you want to have. If you are from database background it is similar to ALIAS in SQL. In Python there is a popular data manipulation package called pandas which simplifies doing these kind of data operations.

    [...]

    First step is to install pandas package if it is not already installed. You can check if the package is installed on your machine by running !pip show pandas statement in Ipython console. If it is not installed, you can install it by using the command !pip install pandas.

  • Create the function which converts a given string into an md5 hash and return the value in the hexadecimal format

    When you sign up for an account somewhere, some websites do not actually store your password in their databases. Instead, they will transform your password into something else using a cryptographic hashing algorithm.

    After the password is transformed, it is then called a password hash. Whenever you try to login, the website will transform the password you tried using the same hashing algorithm and simply see if the password hashes are the same.

    Create the python function that converts a given string into an md5 hash. The return value should be encoded in hexadecimal.

  • How to rename columns in pandas dataframe

    In this tutorial, we will cover various methods to rename columns in pandas dataframe in Python. Renaming or changing the names of columns is one of the most common data wrangling task. If you are not from programming background and worked only in Excel Spreadsheets in the past you might feel it not so easy doing this in Python as you can easily rename columns in MS Excel by just typing in the cell what you want to have. If you are from database background it is similar to ALIAS in SQL. In Python there is a popular data manipulation package called pandas which simplifies doing these kind of data operations.

  • Unravelling unary arithmetic operators

    In this entire blog series on Python's syntactic sugar, this might end up being the most boring post. We will cover the unary arithmetic operators: -, +, and ~ (inversion if you don't happen to be familiar with that last operator). Due to the fact that there is only a single object being involved, it's probably the most straightforward syntax to explain in Python.

    [...]

    That is literally all of the documentation for unary arithmetic operators in Python's data model. Now is that an over-simplification, or is it actually as simple as it sounds?

Python Programming

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Development
  • Python 3.8.5 : Linked List - part 001.
  • Doug Hellmann: sphinxcontrib.datatemplates 0.7.0

    sphinxcontrib.datatemplates is an extension for Sphinx to render parts of reStructuredText pages from data files in formats like JSON, YAML, XML, and CSV.

  • Python : 10 Ways to Filter Pandas DataFrame

    In this article, we will cover various methods to filter pandas dataframe in Python. Data Filtering is one of the most frequent data manipulation operation. It is similar to WHERE clause in SQL or you must have used filter in MS Excel for selecting specific rows based on some conditions. In terms of speed, python has an efficient way to perform filtering and aggregation. It has an excellent package called pandas for data wrangling tasks. Pandas has been built on top of numpy package which was written in C language which is a low level language. Hence data manipulation using pandas package is fast and smart way to handle big sized datasets.

  • Top GUI Frameworks that is every Python Developer's Favorite

    Python is one of the most popular and widely known programming languages that is a favorite in the developer community. Its advanced libraries and file extensions enable developers to build state-of-the-art tools for real-world problems, or simply design a GUI (Graphic User Interface). GUI plays an essential role in the computer world as it makes human-machine interaction easier. Python offers a diverse range of options for GUI frameworks. Some of these frameworks are more preferred by the developers to build both .apk and .exe applications. Moreover, its GUI toolkits include TK, GTK, QT, and wxWidgets, which come with more features than other platform-specific kits. Though the Python wiki on GUI programming lists on 30 cross-platform frameworks, we have selected our top 4 picks. They are:

    Kivy: It an open-source Python library for the rapid development of applications that makes use of innovative user interfaces, such as multi-touch apps. This liberal MIT-licensed Kivy is based on OpenGL ES 2 and includes native multi-touch for each platform. It is an event-driven framework based around the main loop, making it very suitable for game development. It supports multiple platforms, namely, Windows, MacOSX, Linux, Android-iOS, and Raspberry Pi. Unlike QtCreator, Kivy doesn’t have a visual layout program, but it uses its own design language to help you associate UI layout with code objects.

C/C++ Programming

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Development
  • How to use Strcpy() in C language?

    In this article, we are going to learn about the strcpy() function in the C programming language. The strcpy() function is a very popular standard library function to perform the string copy operation in the C programming language. There are several standard header files in C programming language to perform standard operations. The “string.h” is one of such header files, which provides several standard library functions to perform string operations. The “strcpy()” function is one of the library functions provided by “string.h”.

  • How to Use C++ Vector

    An array is a series of same object types in consecutive memory locations. An array cannot increase ore reduce in length. A vector is like an array, but its length can be increased or reduced. A vector, therefore, has many more operations than an array.

    C++ has many libraries, all of which form the C++ Standard Library. One of these libraries is the container library. A container is a collection of objects, and certain operations can be performed on the collection. C++ containers can be grouped into two sets: sequence containers and associative containers. Sequence containers are vector, array (not the same array discussed previously), deque, forward_list, and list. These are different collections (array-like data structures), and each offers distinct trade-offs.

    Any programmer should know how to decide whether to use a vector, an array, a deque, a forward_list, or a list. When a programmer needs a structure that requires more operations than those associated with an ordinary array, the ordinary array should not be used.

    If the task involves frequent insertions and deletions in the middle of the sequence, then a list or forward_list should be used. If the task involves frequent insertions and deletions in the beginning or end of a sequence, then a deque should be used. A vector should be used when these kinds of operations are not required.

  • How to Use isalpha() in C Language

    There are several standard library header files in the C programming language used to perform various standard operations. The “ctype.h” is one such header file, and the “isalpha()” function is one of the library functions provided by “ctype.h.” The isalpha() library function is used to identify whether a character is an alphabet. In this article, you will learn about the isalpha() library function in C language.

  • NVIDIA C++ Standard Library Now Available Via GitHub

    Introduced last year as part of CUDA 10.2 was libcu++ as the CUDA C++ standard library, which works with not only NVIDIA CUDA enabled configurations but also CPUs. The libcu++ sources are now available via GitHub.

The Top 50 Programming Languages to Learn Coding

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Development

Gone are the days when a handful of people were considered as top computer programmers and developers. The dawn of the digital age has now made it possible to everyone to play with codes and write a computer program. What all this need is to have a solid grasp of emerging technology and programming languages. However, it is not as easy as it seems since there are a large number of programming languages out there and choosing one and master in it might be challenging. Thus, before getting started into the world of coding, you must make the right choice and come up with the one that best suited for you.

Read more

Also: How to use C++ Pointers

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