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Godot Engine - Multiplayer in Godot 4.0: Scene Replication (part 1)

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Development
Gaming

It's finally time for the long-awaited post about the new multiplayer replication system that is being developed for Godot 4.0. Below, we will introduce the concepts around which it was designed, the currently implemented prototype, and planned changes to make it more powerful and user-friendly.

Design goals

Making multiplayer games has historically been a complex task, requiring ad-hoc optimizations and game-specific solutions. Still, two main concepts are almost ubiquitous in multiplayer games: some form of messaging, and some form of state replication (synchronization and reconciliation).

While Godot does provide a system for messaging (i.e. RPC), it does not provide a common system for replication.

In this sense, we had quite a few #networking meetings in August 2021 to design a replication API that could be used for the common cases, while being extensible via plugins or custom code.

Read more

Programming Leftovers

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Development

  • LLVM Prepares New ThreadSanitizer Runtime That Is Faster, Lower Memory Use - Phoronix

    LLVM developers have been working recently to land their new ThreadSanitizer run-time. The TSan as a reminder is the compiler instrumentation with associated run-time library for being able to detect data races.

    ThreadSanitizer is successful at detecting data race conditions even within large and complex code-bases. But unfortunately it's quite burdensome to enable with performance slowing down in the range of 5~15x while the run-time memory overhead can be in the range of 5~10x.

  • xcrun: error: invalid active developer path - buildVirtual
  • Why PHP Is Getting a Foundation and Why That Matters - FOSS Force

    The PHP Foundation is an effort by 10 key PHP vendors to assure adequate funding to keep the popular scripting language viable.

  • Qt 5.12.12 Released

    We have released Qt 5.12.12 today. This is the last release from Qt 5.12 LTS series and the standard support of Qt 5.12 LTS ends in December 2021.

    Qt 5.12.12 contains ~ 30 bug fixes compared to the Qt 5.12.11. Please check details about the release from Qt 5.12.12 Release Note.

    Note that Qt 5.12 LTS standard support ends in December 2021. It has been quite a long journey with it; big thanks to everyone involved!

  • LWJGL - The Lightweight Java Game Library Version 3.3 Released

    The part to note in this definition is that LWJGL provides access to native APIs through Java. That it is a wrapper over the APIs doesn't mean that you should not be familiar with the semantics of the underlying API. Hence to get the most out of LWJGL a good understanding of the native APIs is essential too.

    At this point it is important to disambiguate between a library and a framework. LWJGL is a library and as such is low level; it is not a gamedev framework like libgdx (which itself uses LWJGL under the covers!) or a gamedev engine like GoDot which provide higher level of abstractions. For this reason, it is not recommended for novice programmers to start out writing games with it.

    And, of course, it is debatable whether Java is a good language for gamedev over the classic value of C++. Some advantages of using Java are its support of multiple operating systems and, of course, the easy learning curve in comparison to C++. Minuses could be garbage collection, performance and a smaller dev community. In any case, it depends on the use case; as they say, choose the best tool for the job at hand.

  • Bitrot resistance of next-generation image formats

    What happens when a single bit gets corrupted in an image file you cherish? The results can range from absolutely nothing to an imperceptible visual change to a complete loss of the image. The hero image below is somewhere in the middle of the scale; where the top half of the image is perfect, and the lower half is reduced to meaningless digital noise.

    Whether due to mechanical failure or transmission interference like cosmic radiation: bitrot happens. A rotted bit, or flipped bit, is when one bit of RAM or persistent storage unintentionally flips its state between zero and one. You can only do so much to protect your system from random failure. Multiple backups and data verification is the only proven strategy to protect against it.

    Traditional JPEG images (referred to as JPEG troughing the article as opposed to JXL), especially with progressive encoding, handle bitrot remarkably well. You might see a single pixel shift its color almost imperceptibly, or one of the encoding layers may shift slightly. The effects are so well understood that you can even find free software that can automatically recover corrupted JPEG photos.

    However, the next-generation image formats pack data much more densely than in the legacy image formats. There’s isn’t just less redundancy, but every single bit means more to the complete image. This means the effects of bitrot produce a much greater loss of visual fidelity and decodes to more abstract results. The newer encoding techniques include predictive models that can get thrown off completely by a single bit out of place. The digital hellfire in the lower half of the above hero image is a perfect example of this.

  • OpenFaaS: How to Add Python Requirements and Dependencies - Anto ./ Online

    This guide will show you how to add requirements and dependencies for a Python project using OpenFaaS.

    Python dependencies are software components that your project needs for it to work. You can manually use PyPI (the Python Package Index) to provide packages that you need, but OpenFaaS can automate this for you.

  • Perl Weekly Challenge 140: Add Binary
  • My Favorite Warnings: experimental | Tom Wyant [blogs.perl.org]

    Perl has had experimental features ever since I started using it at about version 5.6. These were things that were considered useful, but about which there was doubt -- about their final form, whether a satisfactory implementation existed, or whatever.

    Until Perl 5.18, experimental features were simply documented as experimental. At that point, an experimental warning category was added, with sub-categories experimental::lexical_subs, experimental::lexical_topic, experimental::regex_sets, and experimental::smartmatch.

    Most of the features covered by the original Perl 5.18 warning categories were actually introduced in Perl 5.10 as back-ports from Raku (or Perl 6, as it was then called), and not documented as experimental. My impression was that the relevant experimental:: warnings were introduced becaue the corresponding features were recognized as being more experimental than originally believed. Programmers already familiar with a feature might not notice an extra sentence in the documentation, but they will surely notice if their code starts spitting out experimental warnings.

PHP 8.1 Released

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Development
  • 25 Nov 2021: PHP 8.1.0 Released

    The PHP development team announces the immediate availability of PHP 8.1.0. This release marks the latest minor release of the PHP language.

  • PHP 8.1 Released With Fibers, Enumerations, Read-Only Properties & Much More - Phoronix

    PHP 8.1.0 was just officially released as the latest annual feature update to this widely-used, server-side programming language.

    PHP 8.1 finally introduces the notion of "enums" or enumerations for a custom type that is a discrete number of possible values. PHP enums can be used anywhere an object can be used.

  • Remi Collet: PHP version 8.1.0 is released!

    RC5 was GOLD, so version 8.1.0 GA is just released, at planed date.

    A great thanks to all developers who have contributed to this new major and long awaiting version of PHP and thanks to all testers of the RC versions who have allowed us to deliver a good quality version.

    RPM are available in the remi-php81 repository for Fedora ≥ 33 and Enterprise Linux ≥ 7 (RHEL, CentOS, Alma, Rocky...) and as Software Collection in the remi-safe repository.

Programming Leftovers

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Development
  • NVIDIA's Open-Source Image Scaling SDK 1.0 Released - Phoronix

    Last week NVIDIA announced the Image Scaling SDK as an open-source, cross-platform GPU image upscaling implementation that with their own hardware makes use of DLSS. Following the brief exposure over the past week, NVIDIA Image Scaling SDK 1.0 has been formally christened.

    The NVIDIA Image Scaling SDK can work on the likes of Intel and AMD Radeon hardware via the SDK's generic compute shaders that are MIT licensed. Integrating the NVIDIA Image Scaling SDK does require integration on part of the game/engine developer.

  • Tips for formatting when printing to console from C++ | Opensource.com

    When I started writing, I did it primarily for the purpose of documenting for myself. When it comes to programming, I'm incredibly forgetful, so I began to write down useful code snippets, special characteristics, and common mistakes in the programming languages I use. This article perfectly fits the original idea as it covers common use cases of formatting when printing to console from C++.

  • In response to the moderation team resignation [Ed: Rust project doing massive damage control campaign now, just as those who resigned had predicted. Rust lacks legitimacy. GAFAM prisoner. Microsoft controlled.]

    As top-level team leads, project directors to the Foundation, and core team members, we are actively collaborating to establish next steps after the statement from the Rust moderation team.

  • This Week In Rust: This Week in Rust 418

Programming Leftovers

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Development
  • Using AWK with CSV Files

    Unfortunately, things get more complex from there.

    CSV files can contain commas, line-breaks, and delimited quotes within the quoted values, which is great for storing data in a CSV file, but is something that AWK is just not well suited to handle: [...]

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: nanotime 0.3.4 on CRAN: Maintenance Update

    Another (minor) nanotime release, now at version 0.3.4, arrived at CRAN overnight. It exports some nanoperiod functionality via a C++ header, and Leonardo and I will use this in an upcoming package that we hope to talk about a little more in a few days. It also adds a few as.character.*() methods that had not been included before.

    nanotime relies on the RcppCCTZ package for (efficient) high(er) resolution time parsing and formatting up to nanosecond resolution, and the bit64 package for the actual integer64 arithmetic. Initially implemented using the S3 system, it has benefitted greatly from a rigorous refactoring by Leonardo who not only rejigged nanotime internals in S4 but also added new S4 types for periods, intervals and durations.

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: RcppArmadillo 0.10.7.3.0 on CRAN: Bugfix, New Features

    Armadillo is a powerful and expressive C++ template library for linear algebra aiming towards a good balance between speed and ease of use with a syntax deliberately close to a Matlab. RcppArmadillo integrates this library with the R environment and language–and is widely used by (currently) 928 other packages on CRAN.

    I somehow missed to blog and tweet about the recent release based on the Armadillo 10.7.3 upstream release. Conrad is in “long-term support mode”, and 10.7.* is meant to provide fixes and stability relative to the most recent release which we did on September 30. We did actually find a regression when checking reverse-dependencies requiring an upstream move to 10.7.3. At the same time, we folded pull request #352 in. It addresses an old bug of ours where Armadillo fields types were not converted correctly in all dimensions.

  • PHP Established New Non-Commercial Organization PHP Foundation

    The reasons behind the establishment of the PHP Foundation is that one of the key contributors, Nikita Popov, has decided to switch his focus away from PHP to LLVM.

    You might think that large open source projects are well-funded, but this is not true. In fact many of them rely on a small group of maintainers, as is exactly the case with PHP.

    Despite being used by 78% of the web, PHP only has a few full-time contributors.

    Nikita Popov, a well-known long-time PHP ecosystem contributor, is the author of generators, variadic functions and argument unpacking, engine exceptions, uniform variable syntax, and many other PHP contributions. He is also known for PHP Parser which laid the groundwork for many other tools.

    Popov started working on PHP in 2011 and worked on PHP at JetBrains with the PhpStorm team, making significant contributions to three major releases there – PHP 7.4, PHP 8.0, and PHP 8.1.

Linux Development Leftovers

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Development
Linux
  • Intel Posts New Iteration Of Key Locker Support For Linux - Phoronix

    With Intel Tiger Lake mobile processors introduced last year there has been good open-source support going back to launch, but a few of the more niche features have seen slower than normal handling for getting the features supported by the upstream Linux kernel. The latest patch series being revived now is for Intel Key Locker support.

    Just a few days ago I talked about Intel pursuing a new Indirect Branch Tracking (IBT) patch series as part of their Control-Flow Enforcement Technology (CET) introduced on Tiger Lake. After months of silence, another Tiger Lake feature is seeing revised kernel patches emerge this week and that is for Key Locker.

  • EasyOS: Kernel 5.10.81 compiled with improved AMD CPU support

    I don't have a PC with AMD CPU, so haven't bothered much with configuring the kernel to work with them. However, some guys testing EasyOS are keen on them, so today have given it a closer look.

  • Digest of YaST Development Sprints 135 & 136

    As already explained in this same blog quite some time ago the YaST Partitioner can be used to set up several kinds of encryption, but “Regular LUKS2” was not one of those. That was intentional because using LUKS2 comes with many challenges, as summarized in this Bugzilla comment. But now the time has come to start introducing experimental support for general LUKS2 encryption. Initially it will be available in openSUSE Tumbleweed and pre-releases of SLE-15-SP4 but only if the environment variable YAST_LUKS2_AVAILABLE is set. Check the description of this pull request for screenshots and more information.

    Support for LUKS2 in AutoYaST will have to wait a bit, until we have received some feedback from interactive installations and ironed out all the details. But AutoYaST users can meanwhile test and enjoy another new feature available also in Tumbleweed and 15.4 pre-releases - support for identifying EFI systems in dynamic profiles, which includes both rules and ERB templates. Learn more and see some examples in the description of the corresponding pull request.

    The last feature for Tumbleweed and the upcoming 15.4 that we want to highlight in this report is the brand new support for NTLM authentication in linuxrc.

Programming Leftovers

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Development
  • Dependency Derby | Coder Radio 441

    Are Linux devs getting upset with the Python community? We weigh in on a nuanced issue. Plus the mass-mod resignation over at Rust, and Mike's thoughts on setting up a dev environment on Windows 11.

  • Adobe XD Bridge TP for Qt Design Studio released!

    Adobe XD Bridge TP for Qt Design Studio released!

    Qt Design Studio is a UI design and development tool that enables designers and developers to rapidly prototype and develop complex UIs.

  • Python virtualenv and venv dos and don’ts
  • Oscilloscope Probes Itself To Add Video | Hackaday

    Modern oscilloscopes are often loaded with features, but every now and then you run into a feature that seems easy to implement yet isn’t available. [kgsws] wanted to use his Rigol DS1074 to show live measurements in his YouTube videos, but found out that this scope doesn’t support video output. Not to be deterred, [kgsws] decided to add this feature himself. In the video embedded below, he describes in detail the process of adding a USB Video Capture (UVC) interface to his oscilloscope.

    The basic idea was to find the signals going into the scope’s display and read them out using a Cypress EZ-USB board. This is a development board that can be used to design USB devices, and supports the UVC mode. However, with no documentation of any of the Rigol’s internal circuitry [kgsws] had to probe the display connector to find out which pin carried which signal. And since he had no other scope available than this Rigol, he hooked up the various bits of the disassembled instrument so that it could (awkwardly) probe its own internal signals.

  • 7 Segment Display And Raspberry PI Pico: Wiring and Setup with MicroPython

    7 segment display can be controlled with a few Micropython lines from Raspberry PI Pico. It is one of simplest projects and a funny way to start coding and cabling

    In this tutorial, I’m going t show you how to connect and configure a 7 segment display with a Raspberry PI Pico. If you are interested in how to get it working with Raspberry PI computer boards (like RPI Zero, RPI 4 model B, RPI 3 model A/B, and so on), please refer to my Control a 7 Segment Display from Raspberry PI with Python.

Security Fixes in Ruby

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Development
Security

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • PHP Foundation formed to fund core developers, vows to pay 'market salaries'

    The trigger for this initiative appears to be the decision of Nikita Popov, a significant PHP contributor, to focus mainly on LLVM in future. Popov, currently a software developer at JetBrains working on the PhpStorm IDE, will be leaving the company from 1 December, according to a post by product marketing manager Roman Pronskiy, which also introduces the new foundation.

  • The New Life of PHP – The PHP Foundation

    During PHP’s 26-year history, the language has been actively developed by a huge number of people, such as Rasmus Lerdorf, Zeev Suraski, Andi Gutmans, Nikita Popov, and many, many others. In 2021, PHP is in for another round of evolution.

    [...]

    The PHP Foundation will be a non-profit organization whose mission is to ensure the long life and prosperity of the PHP language.

  • [Old] Avoiding Busses

    It's always been the case that there are certain parts of PHP source code that only a few people understand. The Karma system used to help us determine where a contributor could commit code in the source tree; If you had /Zend karma, you had a clue about Zend. Among those people with /Zend karma, some people understood more than others.

    This was a perfectly sustainable way of developing the language, because while /Zend is complicated, it's written in a language that everybody working on a C project understands. In principle, we can take people who know a little C and turn them into a /Zend karma worthy workhorse for PHP, able to produce patches, and fixes, and features. Indeed, we have done, and are still doing that in the incubator that is Stackoverflow chat.

    Many moons have passed ... What do you think the bus factor of PHP is today ?

  • Why Now Is the Time to Get a Job in Tech

    Now is a great time to get started with a career in tech. The recent Great Resignation and corresponding churn in the job market means many organizations are looking to hire workers immediately. According to the recent Job Openings and Labor Turnover (JOLTS) report, 4.4 million Americans left their jobs in September, and there are now 10.4 million job openings, which passes pre-pandemic levels.

  • Dynatrace : OneAgent release notes version 1.229

    Starting with Dynatrace version 1.231, the Extension Framework (also referred to as the plugins framework) will start using Python 3.8. The Python 3.6 component will be replaced by Python 3.8.

Wayland Protocols, CSS, and Programming

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Development
  • [ANNOUNCE] wayland-protocols 1.24
    wayland-protocols 1.24 is now available.
    
    This release adds feedback to the DMA buffer protocol, allowing smarter and
    more dynamic DMA buffer allocation semantics. Other changes include
    documentation improvements and improved testing infrastructure.
    
    This is also the first release of wayland-protocols that do not include a
    autotools build description.
    
  • Wayland Protocols 1.24 Released With Improvement To DMA-BUF Protocol For Multi-GPUs - Phoronix

    Wayland Protocols 1.24 is out today as the latest revision to this official collection of the Wayland protocols/specifications. Notable with the 1.24 revision is the introduction of wp_linux_dmabuf_feedback.

    Added initially as an "unstable" addition for Wayland-Protocols 1.24 is wp_linux_dmabuf_feedback as the "feedback" addition to the Linux DMA-BUF protocol. This is particularly useful for modern multi-GPU setups where needing to know about the GPU device in use by the compositor and the semantics around it such as if using the secondary GPU that DMA-BUF can still exchange buffers with the main GPU and in a compatible format.

  • Excellent Free Tutorials to Learn CSS - LinuxLinks

    Web pages are built with HTML, which specifies the content of a page. CSS (Cascading Style Sheets) is a separate language which specifies a page’s appearance.

    CSS code is made of static rules. Each rule takes one or more selectors and gives specific values to a number of visual properties. Those properties are then applied to the page elements indicated by the selectors.

    Here’s our recommended tutorials to learn CSS.

  • Python 3.11 new and deprecated Features – NextGenTips

    Python 3.11 has just been released, we can explore the new features which had been added and removed from the previous release.

    Python programming language is an interpreted high-level general-purpose programming language. Its design philosophy emphasizes code readability with its use of significant code indentation.

  • How to work with Jupyter Notebooks in PyCharm

    If you are someone in the field of Computer Science, chances are you’re a little familiar with Python. As this high-level, general-purpose programming language is rising in popularity, its strengths and impact are becoming more and more prominent. New developers want to delve into data analytics possible with Python’s elite data visualization and analysis tools.

    Python is Significant in the World of Programming

    According to a survey done by JetBrains, “Python is the primary language used by 84% of programmers. Furthermore, almost 58% of developers use Python for data analysis, while 52% use it for web development. The use of Python for DevOps, machine learning, and web crawling or web scraping follow close behind along with a multitude of other uses.”

  • Intel Graphics Compiler 1.0.9289 Released As A Huge Update - Phoronix

    Intel just released IGC 1.0.9289 as a huge update to their open-source Graphics Compiler used on Linux currently by their OpenCL/oneAPI Level Zero compute stack and also by Windows with their official driver.

    The LLVM-based Intel Graphics Compiler has been maturing well over the past few years since its original introduction as part of their OpenCL "NEO" driver on Linux. Intel has even begun using IGC on Windows within their widely-used driver stack there while Intel's Mesa OpenGL/Vulkan drivers may eventually transition to using IGC too for having a unified graphics compiler across targets.

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More in Tux Machines

October/November in KDE Itinerary

Since the last summary KDE Itinerary has been moving with big steps towards the upcoming 21.12 release, with work on individual transport modes, more convenient ticket access, trip editing, a new health certificate UI, better transfer handling and many more improvements.

New Features
Current ticket access A small but very convenient new addition is the “Current ticket” action, which immediately navigates you to the details page of the most current element on the itinerary. That comes in handy when having to show or scan your ticket and avoids having to find the right entry in the list in a rush. This action is now also accessible from jump list actions in the taskbar on Linux, or app shortcuts on Android. Combined with the easily accessible barcode scanmode mentioned last time it’s now just two clicks or taps to get ready for a ticket check. Read more

New Videos/Shows: Response to Alleged Trolls and Reviewers

today's howtos

  • How To Install AMD Radeon Driver on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install AMD Radeon Driver on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. For those of you who didn’t know, Installing AMD Radeon drivers on the Ubuntu system is an easy task that can be done in less than a minute. Radeon driver is needed by your AMD Radeon Graphics GPU to function with better performance. Some Linux distributions offer the proprietary driver pre-packaged as part of its standard package repository making the entire AMD Radeon Linux Driver procedure extremely easy to follow. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you the step-by-step installation of the FreeOffice on Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa). You can follow the same instructions for Ubuntu 18.04, 16.04, and any other Debian-based distribution like Linux Mint.

  • What you need to know about disks and disk partitions in Linux – LinuxBSDos.com

    This is an update to A beginner’s guide to disks and disk partitions in Linux, which itself was an update to Guide to disks and disk partitions in Linux. It is intended to be an absolute beginner’s guide to understanding how disks and disk partitions are handled in Linux. This update adds info on NVMe SSDs. If you are migrating from Windows to Linux and are attempting to install any Linux distribution alongside Windows 10/11 on your computer, this article should come in handy. You’ll read about hard drive naming convention in Linux, how they are partitioned, partition tables, file systems and mount points. By the time you are through reading this, you should have a pretty good idea of what you are doing when installing your next Linux distribution on your laptop or desktop computer. An understanding of all the aspects concerning how a disk is referenced and partitioned will put you in a better position to troubleshoot installation and disk-related problems. Most of the highly technical terms associated with this subject have been omitted, so this should be an easy read.

  • How To Install PrestaShop on Debian 11 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install PrestaShop on Debian 11. For those of you who didn’t know, PrestaShop is a freemium, open-source e-commerce software. It lets you start your own online store with secure payments, multiple shipping methods, custom themes, and more. PrestaShop written in PHP is highly customizable, supports all the major payment services, is translated in many languages and localized for many countries, has a fully responsive design (both front and back-office), etc. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step-by-step installation of PrestaShop e-commerce software on a Debian 11 (Bullseye).

  • How to Install Asterisk VoIP Server on Debian 11 | 10 - Linux Shout

    In this tutorial, we will discuss some of the steps and commands to install the Asterisk VoIP server on Debian 11 Bullseye or 10 Buster using the terminal to call over Android or iPhone using a local network.

  • How to install Docker-ce on Ubuntu 21.10 – NextGenTips

    In this tutorial am going to show you how you can install Docker-ce on Ubuntu 21.10. Docker is a set of platform as a service product that uses OS-level virtualization to deliver software in packages called containers. Containers are usually isolated from one another and bundled their own software libraries and configuration files, they can communicate with each other through well-defined channels. Docker makes it possible to get more apps running on the same old servers and also makes it easy to package and ship programs.

  • How to Uninstall Software On Ubuntu

    Regardless of the operating system you are using; there are multiple reasons why you might want to uninstall software. Maybe the software has become corrupted, and it doesn’t function the same as before, or your application is now virus-ridden, so uninstalling it is safe. There are times when you don’t use the software anymore, so you uninstall it to make space. We all know that Ubuntu and other Linux distros are different from the commonly used Windows. Users migrating from Windows to Ubuntu can find it hard navigating even the basic stuff. Uninstalling software can be tricky, so this article will help you understand the different ways you can bin software in Ubuntu.

  • How to Mount USB Drive on Linux

    We live in the modern age of technology where there are multiple important variables to keep track of. But arguably, the biggest variable today is “data”. With some maturing and emerging technologies, everything is being centered around the quantity and quality of data. Thus, gathering and protecting data has become paramount. These days, it’s quite common to see people carrying their data around at all times. Different devices and technologies are used for this purpose, including a certain device called USB (Universal Serial Bus). A USB is an electronic communication protocol (ECP) most commonly used for computer accessories and other small-end electronic devices, either for data transfer or power transfer. Although USBs are being phased out slowly due to technologies such as “Cloud Computing”, there is a sense of privacy and security with using USBs that you don’t get with other methods. Accessing USBs is straightforward. It is a plug-and-use device, so the stick only needs to be connected to your computer via a USB port. Usually, USBs mount themselves automatically to your system regardless of the operating system, but there are instances where there is a problem, and the USB refuses to connect. For such times, if you are using a Linux distro, it is best to use the Terminal and execute your way to mount the USB in your computer. This article will be guiding you on how exactly you can achieve this task. Although it is time-consuming, once you know how to mount a USB in Linux, you will feel lightened, and it will be easier for you to perform it the next time when needed. So follow these instructions to get a proper hang of it.

  • How do I change my homepage in WordPress?

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  • How do I Rename a Column in MySQL?

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  • What Are Environment Variables in Linux? Everything You Need to Know

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  • SysMonTask – SparkyLinux

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Godot Engine - Multiplayer in Godot 4.0: Scene Replication (part 1)

It's finally time for the long-awaited post about the new multiplayer replication system that is being developed for Godot 4.0. Below, we will introduce the concepts around which it was designed, the currently implemented prototype, and planned changes to make it more powerful and user-friendly.

Design goals
Making multiplayer games has historically been a complex task, requiring ad-hoc optimizations and game-specific solutions. Still, two main concepts are almost ubiquitous in multiplayer games: some form of messaging, and some form of state replication (synchronization and reconciliation). While Godot does provide a system for messaging (i.e. RPC), it does not provide a common system for replication. In this sense, we had quite a few #networking meetings in August 2021 to design a replication API that could be used for the common cases, while being extensible via plugins or custom code. Read more