Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Development

Python Programming

Filed under
Development

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development

Julia v1.5.0 has been released

Filed under
Development

Thank you to everyone who made this year’s JuliaCon great! As a parting gift, the Julia developers are pleased to announce the release of Julia v1.5.0, the fifth minor release in the 1.x series. Jeff and Stefan put together a blog post highlighting some of the most exciting new features in 1.5. Check it out!

As usual, binaries are available for all of your favorite platforms (Linux, macOS, Windows, and FreeBSD) at https://julialang.org/downloads.

As a minor release, v1.5.0 contains no breaking changes, only new features, performance improvements, and marginal, undisruptive changes in behavior. You can also see the NEWS file for the full set of changes.

Note that like 1.5, like its predecessor 1.4, does not have long term support. As of this release 1.4 has been effectively superseded by 1.5, which means that there will not likely be any further 1.4.x releases. Julia 1.0 is still currently the only long term support version.

We encourage everyone to give it a try. Packages can test with 1.5.0 on CI by specifying 1.5 on Travis, AppVeyor, Cirrus, and GitHub Actions. As always, let us know in the issue tracker if you run into any issues.

Read more

Also: Julia 1.5 has been released

Python Programming

Filed under
Development

Programming: Python, Perl, and GNOME/GTK

Filed under
Development

           

  • Why proactively clean Python 2 up?

    It seems a recurring complaint that we’re too aggressive on cleaning Python 2 up from packages. Why remove it if (package’s) upstream still supports py2? Why remove it when it still works? Why remove it when somebody’s ready to put some work to keep it working?

    I’m pretty sure that you’re aware that Python 2 has finally reached its end-of-life. It’s past its last release, and the current version is most likely vulnerable. We know we can’t remove it entirely just yet (but the clock is ticking!), so why remove its support here and there instead of keeping it some more?

    This is best explained on the example of dev-python/twisted — but dev-python/pillow is also quite similar. Twisted upstream removed support for Python 2 at version 20. This means that we ended up having to keep two versions of Twisted — 19 that still supports Python 2, and 20 that does not. What does that means for our users?

    Firstly, they can’t normally upgrade Twisted if at least one of its reverse dependencies supports Python 2 and is installed. What’s important is that the user does not have to meaningfully need or use Python 2 in that reverse dependency. It is entirely sufficient that it supports Python 2 and the user is using default PYTHON_TARGETS.

    Of course, you could argue that changing the default PYTHON_TARGETS would resolve the problem without having to proactively remove Python 2 from Twisted revdeps. Today, I’m not sure which of the two options is better. However, back when cleanup started changing default PT would involve a lot of pain for the users. We’d have to reenable 2.7 via package.use for many packages (but which ones?) or the users would have to reenable it themselves. But that’s really tangential now.

  •        

  • Python Bytes: #192 Calculations by hand, but in the compter, with Handcalcs

    Idea by Guido van Rossum to bring back the print statement.

  •        

  • PyDev 7.7.0 released (mypy integration improvements, namespace packages)

    This release brings multiple improvements for dealing with type hints as well as improvements in the Mypy integration in PyDev:

    The MYPYPATH can now be set automatically to the source folders set on PyDev and the --follow-imports flag is set to silent by default (this flag is required because only one file is analyzed at a time in PyDev as failing to do so would end up showing errors for other files).

  •        

  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Weekly Check-in #10
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Weekly Check-In: Week 10
  • Perl Weekly Challenge 71: Peak Elements and Trim Linked List
  • The Perl Weekly Challenge #071

    With another Linked List related task, I am now enjoying it a lot. It also gives me the opportunity to work with Class in Raku. Learning Raku has changed my thinking a big way. The developer inside me is more organised than before. Also doing regular weekly challenge made me think from unit test point of view every time I come up with a solution. In fact, it dictates the design of my solution. Now with the regular Live Video Raku Reviews by Andrew Shitov gave me the insights of others Raku solutions. It is amazing how he break the code into pieces to make it easy to understand. No book can teach you that. You only learn from experience or watching video from Andrew Shitov.

    Running [The|Perl] Weekly Challenge also taught me how to manage my spare time. I use my spare time very carefully. Before I would jump to anything that excites me. Last few weeks, I have started playing with Swift programming language. I am enjoying the journey. Please checkout my Swift solution to the Task #1 of Peak Elements.

  • Mariana Pícolo: The Second milestone

    By discussing with my mentor how could the best approach be, I found out that the notifications were already grouped on the code level, but these groups were not being represented in the UI.

    In the code, there's a class named Source, which is responsible for the group. They handle the info's about the app that have sent us any notification and store them.

    There's also a class named Notification, that creates a single notification, with title, banner, and has optional parameters such as playing sounds etc.

    Each Source has an array property that contains its notification objects, which gives us the groups.

    [...]

    Lastly, I'd like to talk about GUADEC which this year was completely remote.

    This was my first talk at a conference, in a language that I'm not a native speaker. I want to thank my mentor and the GNOME community for creating a comfortable environment for the interns to talk about their projects.

Programming: Perl, Python, Java, Fortran and More

Filed under
Development
  • [Perl] Monthly Report - July

    God, the year 2020 seems never ending. I just pray it gets over quickly and we start fresh with new year 2021. Unfortunately we have to wait for another 5 months. In the current situation, anything can happen in this period. Please stay safe and avoid unnecessary human contacts.

    So what was the main attraction of last month?

    Well, quite a few, to begin with, I submitted 12 Pull Requests which is much better than the month before i.e. 9 Pull Requests. I remember there was time when I used to submit at least 50 PR every month. I aim to do at least 1 PR every 2 days i.e. 15 PR every month. Unfortunately I have only managed to do that in January i.e. 22 Pull Requests. I did come close to the target in two months e.g. May (13 Pull Requests) and July (12 Pull Requests). I am going to keep trying hard. Wish me luck.

    I would like to talk about my participation to the Pull Request Club contributions. Ever since I joined i.e. January 2019, I have never missed a single month. As of today, I have submitted 20 Pull Requests to 20 different distributions. Of those 10 have been accepted and merged. There are 9 PR still open and 1 closed without merge. So overall 50% success rate, not a bad attempt so far.

  • How and why I built Machine Learning model to predict tennis table matches results

    First of all I have chosen Python as the language for the project since python provides many libraries and documentations to support with any challengs during this milestone.

  •         

  • Just updated - Optimize Images v1.3.6

    Optimize Images has just been updated to version 1.3.6, a minor but still important release that fixes a few bugs and improves its overall stability. Thank you for using Optimize Images and/or contributing with feature suggestions, bug reports, or pull requests!

  • Java ternary operator

    Ternary operator can be used as the alternative of ‘if-else’ and ‘if-else-if’ statements. It is called a ternary operator because it takes three operands to do any task. If the conditional expression that is used in a ternary statement returns true, then it executes a particular statement; otherwise, it executes another statement. The ‘?’ and ‘:’ symbols are used to define the ternary statement. The ternary operator is better to use for solving a very simple task in place of ‘if’ statement. Different uses of the ternary operator in java are shown in this tutorial.

  • Java List Tutorial

    The list is a useful way to store ordered multiple data like an array in Java. But It has many features that do not exist in the array. The list is called an ordered collection, and it is an interface that extends the Collection interface. It cannot create an object like an array, but it implements four classes to use the functionalities of the list. These classes are ArrayList, LinkList, Stack, and Vector. These are defined in the Java Collection Framework. ArrayList and LinkList classes are widely used in Java. The insert, update, delete, and search operations are done in the list based on the index-value like an array. It can store both null and duplicate values. java.util package contains the ‘list’ interface, and it will require to import to use the ‘list’. How the different methods of the ‘list’ can be used in Java are shown in this tutorial.

  • Java switch case statement

    ‘switch-case’ statement can be used as the alternative of ‘if-else-if’ statement where different conditions are defined in different ‘if’ statements. If the first condition returns false, then check the second condition and so on. Defining multiple conditions using this way is a very lengthy process. The same task can be done very simply by using a switch-case statement. It contains different execution parts and executes the statement where the particular value matches with any ‘case’ value. The switch statement can be applied to the various types of primitive data such as int, char, byte, etc. The different uses of switch-case statements in Java are explained in this tutorial.

  • Fortran newsletter: August 2020

    Welcome to the August 2020 edition of the monthly Fortran newsletter. The newsletter comes out on the first calendar day of every month and details Fortran news from the previous month.

  • Which Is The Best WordPress Caching Plugin?

    I’ve talked about how I optimise this site before, but I wanted to do some digging into which is the best WordPress caching plugin. I’ve tested some of the most popular caching plugins available, and decided to write this post with the results.

  • 10 Tips to Defeat Your Fear of Coding

    Why do you fear to code? Is it because you’re afraid to mess up or break something? is it because the technical concepts are confusing for you? is it because of so many overwhelming concepts in programming? Whatever your answer is…but, the most pleasurable thing for a programmer is the moment when they see their code run in the blink of an eye and the magic happens on the screen.

    Coding is intimidating, coding is overwhelming but if anyone defeats the fear of coding then it’s also one of the most enjoyable and fun things to do. Some people who enjoy coding get addicted to it and they start spending hours either trying different programming strategies or building the new applications, or solving some coding-related challenging problems. In this blog, we will discuss the top reasons why people fear of coding and tips to overcome this problem.

  • July 2020: webmail, custom MDA and python framework work

    The issue is that folder pinning is far from being the only thing I want to do with incoming mails at delivery time, and shoving everything in the mda executable is not ideal. I rewrote the MDA to have it handle delivery only and call an API to determine where it should do it, this let me play with a ton of ideas on a custom API server without tweaking the working MDA. At the end of the day, I had incoming mails processed by various text analyzers, attachments automatically extracted and put in an s3 backing store, and mails indexed for fast lookups.

    I will not expand much on how I did this as I think it makes a nice topic for a dedicated article on custom MDA, and fun stuff you can easily do with them to provide some awesome features on your mail setup.

  • Intel ISPC 1.14 Released With Initial GPU Offloading Support

    A few days back we wrote of Intel's ISPC compiler landing GPU code generation support for their UHD/Iris/Xe Graphics from Gen9 Skylake and beyond. Following that code being merged, ISPC 1.14.0 was quickly tagged.

    Intel ISPC 1.14.0 was released shortly after the GPU support code landed for the Implicit SPMD Program Compiler. See more details on the GPU code landing in the aforelinked article. It's an exciting milestone and another great Intel software achievement playing into their oneAPI efforts. ISPC 1.14.0 continues offering great first-rate CPU support across all platforms. All of these open-source goodies remain open-source as one of Intel's continued strong points.

Python Programming

Filed under
Development
  • Verbose regular expressions, now you have one and a bit problems

    Regular expressions (regexes) are famously hard to read or write. There are some techniques you can use to improve this. Like any other code you write, your regular expression patterns should

    include comments

    break apart large blocks into smaller related sections

    use named variables and identifiers

  • Talk Python to Me: #275 Beautiful Pythonic Refactorings

    Do you obsess about writing your code just the right way before you get started? Maybe you have some ugly code on your hands and you need to make it better. Either way, refactoring could be your ticket to happier days! On this episode, we'll talk through a powerful example of iteratively refactoring some code until we eventually turn our ugly duckling into a Pythonic beauty.

  • Python Monthly July 2020

    Being a Python developer is a fantastic career option. Python is now the most popular language with lots of growing job demand (especially in the fields of Web, Data Science and Machine Learning). You have many job opportunities, you can work around the world, and you get to solve hard problems. One thing that is hard, however, is staying up to date with the constantly evolving ecosystem. You want to be a top-performing python developer, coder, programmer, software developer, but you don’t have time to select from hundreds of articles, videos and podcasts each day.

    This monthly newsletter is focused on keeping you up to date with the industry, keeping your skills sharp, without wasting your valuable time. I will be sharing the most important articles, podcasts and videos of the month. Think Tim Ferriss and the Pareto Principle (80/20 rule) meeting the Software Development world. What’s the 20% that will get you 80% of the results?

  • PSF GSoC students blogs: [Week 9] Check-in

Programming: Python, Java, and Perl

Filed under
Development
  • Time spent on the moon

    This post will illustrate two things: the amount of time astronauts have spent on the moon, and how to process dates and times in Python.

    I was curious how long each Apollo mission spent on the lunar surface, so I looked up the timelines for each mission from NASA. Here’s the timeline for Apollo 11, and you can find the timelines for the other missions by making the obvious change to the URL.

  • Java Constructor Tutorial

    The constructor tool is a very important and useful method used for object-oriented programming. It is not mandatory to declare a constructor for any class, and this tool is mainly used to initialize the object of the class at the time of object creation. The constructor does not work like other normal methods. Rather, the constructor tool is called automatically when an object is declared, and it allocates the memory location for the object. This tutorial will show you how different types of user-defined constructors can be implemented and used in Java class programming.

  • Java if, if-else, if-else-if

    The use of a control flow statement is a very common requirement for solving any programming problem. It is mainly used to generate a particular output based on the particular condition. This statement makes the decision based on the Boolean value return by the statement. The declaration of the if-else-if statement is quite similar to other programming languages like C, C++, etc. The uses of different ‘if’ statements in Java are explained in this tutorial.

  • Java Array Tutorial

    The array object is used to store multiple data in Java. This tool allocates particular memory locations serially based on the array size. An array object in Java can store any one type of primitive or non-primitive data. That means that it can store a list of integers, strings, objects, etc. So, all the values of an array can be data of a particular datatype. The index value of an array starts from 0, as in other programming languages. Both single- and multi-dimensional arrays can be declared in Java. A list of data can be organized and sorted very easily by using an array. The major limitation of arrays is that the size of the array is fixed and it cannot be changed at the run-time. This tutorial will show how array objects can be declared, initialized, accesses, and modified.

  • Java for loop

    Sometimes, it requires to execute some statements repeatedly for getting any particular output to solve a problem, and this type of task can be done easily by using any type of loop. Generally, three types of loops are supported by most of the programming languages. The ‘for’ loop is one of them. This loop is very useful for doing different types of programming tasks. How ‘for’ loop can be used in Java for multiple purposes is explained in this tutorial.

  • Perl7 is a fork of values

    Before reading this, you should watch this video where Bryan Cantrill explains a value-conflict between Joyent and Node.js, I believe we have a similar problem.

  • 8 tips for running a virtual hackathon

    Hackathons are events where developers, product managers, designers, and others come together to tackle problems over a short time period. They have become increasingly popular over the last 15 years after OpenBSD ran the first hackathon in June 1999.

    These events provide several benefits—greater engagement across the community, innovation and new ideas, awareness for the organizers, and networking opportunities for participants.

    Mattermost, an open source messaging platform for DevOps teams, has also run and participated in several hackathons to engage with the open source community. So far, in 2020, we participated in a hackathon to overcome the challenges of COVID-19 and ran a hackfest to create open source chatbots for developer workflows. Both had thousands of participants and were run completely virtually.

  • 2020 Call for Code Global Challenge submissions are closed

    We want to extend our deep appreciation to everyone who answered, supported, and championed the 2020 Call for Code Global Challenge. From building solutions to take on the impacts of climate change, to swiftly responding to the surge of the COVID-19 pandemic, we applaud you for your unwavering commitment to fighting back against these difficult times. This year has been unprecedented on many levels, but what we have seen from the Call for Code community is that when the chips are down, your innovation and problem-solving prowess rises up.

    As of July 31, submissions for the 2020 Call for Code Global Challenge are closed, but another chapter awaits — and it needs your help. Whether you are looking to take on COVID-19, climate change, natural disasters, or other pressing social issues, your code has a vital role to play. Brush up on your cloud skills while making a real difference and get involved with Call for Code open source projects supported by The Linux Foundation. Through your contributions, you could be recognized as a community champion. Visit Call for Code on Monday, August 3, and we’ll have details for you on how you can get involved and start making an impact in these projects. I would also encourage you to continue development on your own projects and to share your progress and any help needed in the Slack channel. Your contributions can have global impact well beyond the lifecycle of a single challenge.

  • HOW TO USE MALLOC FUNCTION IN C

    Malloc is a built-in function declared in the header file . Malloc is the short name for ‘memory allocation’ and is used to dynamically allocate a single large block of contiguous memory according to the size specified. There are two types of memory allocation static and dynamic. Static memory allocation is done at compilation time, and it doesn’t change at runtime. Dynamic memory allocation is allocating memory at runtime for this; we use malloc. Now the point is where from this memory is coming, so all dynamic requirements in C are fulfilled from the heap memory.

  • How to use pipe function in C language

    A pipe is a medium for communication between processes. One process writes data to the pipe, and another process reads the data from the pipe. In this article, we will see how the pipe() function is used to implement the concept using C language.

  • What every developer should know about consistency

    But we don’t live an ideal world - your request needs to reach the data store, which then needs to process the request and finally send back a response to you. All these actions take time and are not instantaneous: [...]

Programming With Python

Filed under
Development

  • Top 10 Python Libraries that Every Data Scientist Must Know

    Python is one of the most popular and widely known programming languages that has replaced many programming languages in the industry. It is one of the most loved programming languages that data science professionals use more because it is an ocean of libraries.

    Python is known as the beginner’s level programming language because of its simplicity and easiness, its programming syntax is simple to learn and is of high level compared to C, Java, and C++.

    For more accurate algorithms and coding, Analytics Insight compiles the top 10 Python libraries, here is the list-

  • Why Python is not the programming language of the future -- a response

    See https://towardsdatascience.com/why-python-is-not-the-programming-language-of-the-future-30ddc5339b66.

    This is an interesting article with some important points. And. It has some points that I disagree with.

    Speed. This is a narrow perspective. numpy and pandas are fast, dask is fast. A great many Python ecosystem packages are fast. This complaint seems to be unsupported by evidence.

    Dynamic Scoping Rules. This actually isn't the problem. The problem is something about not being able to change containing scopes. First, I'm not sure changing nesting scopes is of any value at all. Second, the complaint ignores the global and nonlocal statements. The vague "leads to a lot of confusion" seems unsupported by any evidence.

    Lambdas. The distinction between expressions and statements isn't really a distinction in Python in general, only in the bodies of lambdas. I'm not sure what the real problem is, since a lambda with statements seems like a syntactic nightmare better solved with an ordinary, named function.

    Whitespace. Sigh. I've worked with many people who get the whitespace right but the {}'s wrong in C++. The code looks great but doesn't work. Python gets it right. The code looks great and works.

  • How to Extract Sentences from Text Using the NLTK Python Module

    The Natural Language Toolkit (NLTK) is a language and text processing module for Python. NLTK can analyze, process, and tokenize text available in many different languages using its built-in library of corpora and large pool of lexical data. Python is one of the most popular programming languages used in data science and language processing, mainly due to the versatility of the language and the availability of useful modules like NLTK. This article will explain how to extract sentences from text paragraphs using NLTK. The code in this guide has been tested with Python 3.8.2 and NLTK 3.4.5 on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS.

  • I Wrote an Online Escape Game

    I’m an escape room enthusiast, some may say addict, and for the past few months I’ve been missing it. A friend of mine, a true addict with over 500 rooms to his name, started organizing online competitions. After playing a few of the online games, I thought, “I want to build my own.”

    So for that past couple of months I’ve been writing an online escape game — which you could say is a web puzzle game, but with the exciting flare of escape! It’s suitably called “Prototype”. I assumed that name would let me get away with some rough edges. This will be an evolving project, but the first installment is a success.

    I’m proud of my game. I want to tell you how I made it.

  • Newsletter August 2020

    This month we kept refining existing features to improve the user experience, smooth workflows and empower users.

  • Python ASGI CLI
  • Weekly Python StackOverflow Report: (ccxxxviii) stackoverflow python report
  • A Hundred Days of Code, Day 023, Day 24 - Tiny Utility to do comparative DNS Lookups

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • New Tax Collection Tech Replaces 50-Year-Old System

    Fried said recent updates to the old system had fallen mainly to a single employee who had worked for the office for most of the five decades the system had been in place - and finding another programmer with similar skills would have been challenging. The old system used the COBOL programming language and a traditional mainframe computer, whereas the new system is cloud-based and can be managed entirely remotely.

  • Call for Code Daily: tech for the disabled, chatbots, and the final push to submission close
  • Godot Release candidate: 3.2.3 RC 3

    Godot 3.2.2 was released on June 26 with over 3 months' worth of development, including many bugfixes and a handful of features. Some regressions were noticed after the release though, so we decided that Godot 3.2.3 would focus mainly on fixing those new bugs to ensure that all Godot users can have the most stable experience possible.

    Here's a third Release Candidate for the upcoming Godot 3.2.3 release. Please help us test it to ensure that no new regressions have slipped through code review and testing.

    Note: The previous 3.2.3 RC 2 was actually not built from the intended commit, and reflected the same changeset as RC 1. Tests made on RC 2 are still valid and useful, but did not help validate the very latest commits, hence this third release candidate. The changes new in this build are thus the ones made between RC 1 and RC 3.

  • What Is Fuzz Testing? A Guide.

    Not all software testing techniques have origin stories, but fuzz testing does: On a stormy evening in 1988, Barton Miller, a computer science professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, was using a dial-up connection to work remotely on a Unix computer from his apartment. He was attempting to feed input information into a computer program, only to see the program repeatedly crash.

    He knew that the electrical noise from the thunderstorm was distorting his inputs into the program as they traveled through the phone line. The distorted inputs were different from what the software needed from the user, resulting in errors. But as he describes in his book, Fuzzing for Software Security Testing and Quality Assurance, Miller was surprised that even programs he considered robust were crashing as a result of the unexpected input, instead of gracefully handling the error and asking for input again.

    [...]

    Miller’s concern about what he saw during his thunderstorm experience extended beyond the annoyance of having applications crash unexpectedly. Applications that are not able to handle unexpected input also pose security concerns. Errors that aren’t handled by the program are vulnerabilities that attackers can exploit to hack into systems.

    In fact, attackers often use fuzz testing tools to locate vulnerabilities in applications, according to Jared DeMott, the CEO of VDA Labs security testing company and the instructor of several Pluralsight courses on testing.

    “If you follow what we call a secure development lifecycle… fuzzing is one piece of the lifecycle that relates to the testing portion of it,” DeMott said.

  • [Old] Infinite scrolling on the web is complexity layered on top of complexity layered on top of complexity

    Does all that stuff sound hard? Sorry, but it’s worse.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Audiocasts/Shows: Debian 10.5 KDE Plasma Run Through, Late Night Linux, Linux Headlines

  • Debian 10.5 KDE Plasma Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at Debian 10.5. Enjoy!

  • Late Night Linux – Episode 95

    A look back at the year in Linux so far, some speculation about what’s coming, Lineage OS on the Raspberry Pi, and KDE Korner.

  • 2020-08-03 | Linux Headlines

    Linux kernel 5.8 is out, BunsenLabs rebases to Debian 10 “Buster,” Mastodon releases version 3.2 with multimedia enhancements, and The Linux Foundation forms the Open Source Security Foundation.

today's howtos

Android Leftovers

today's leftovers

  • KDE NEON 20200723 overview | The latest and greatest of KDE community

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of KDE NEON 20200723 and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • Vulkan 1.2.149 Released With Another Extension For Helping The Likes Of DXVK

    Vulkan 1.2.149 is out today and its lone new extension is yet another addition to the Vulkan API for helping translation layers like DXVK map other graphics APIs on top. Vulkan has been quite welcoming of additions to help run graphics APIs like OpenGL and Direct3D on top of it. With today's release of Vulkan 1.2.149 there is another addition to help in that multi-project effort and it's VK_EXT_4444_formats.

  • Linux 5.9 Dropping The Unicore 32-bit RISC Architecture

    It's arguably long overdue but with the just-opened Linux 5.9 kernel cycle the Unicore32 CPU architecture is being removed. Unicore is a 32-bit RISC architecture developed at China's Peking University. Unicore is an ARM-like architecture. But with Unicore not being too popular and this code not seeing any maintenance for the mainline kernel paired with no upstream compiler support, it's time to gut the code out of the kernel.

  • IO_uring Has Many Improvements Set To Go Into Linux 5.9

    Facebook's Jens Axboe who oversees the Linux storage/block code and leads the IO_uring efforts summed up the changes for Linux 5.9 as "hardening the code and/or making it easier to read and fixing [bits]." There is though a big change and that is proper async buffered reads support. That work was previously covered but didn't end up getting pulled into Linux 5.8 due to a branching difference but is now ready to go with Linux 5.9. The async buffered reads support for IO_uring has some nice performance advantages and lower CPU usage while also working its way off KThreads for the fast code path once the async buffered write support is in place.

  • New Helix by OnLogic brings GPU computing to the Edge

    Both systems can be configured with a range of Windows operating systems or Ubuntu Linux, and OnLogic plans to add imaging options for many of their software partners in the future, including Ignition by Inductive Automation, ThinManager, EdgeIQ, IGEL and AWS Greengrass.

  • Looks like the recent upwards trend of the Linux market share has calmed down [Ed: As if a Microsoft partner which pretends Android and ChromeOS etc. don't exist was ever painting an accurate picture...]

    For NetMarketShare, something pretty big happened over the last few months. Back in March the Linux share they recorded was only 1.36%, and then it quickly rocketed upwards to 3.61% in June after multiple months of rising. The kind of rise you can't easily just write-off since it continued happening. No one really knows what caused it, possibly a ton more people working from home and not attached to their corporate Windows workstation. Now though, it seems to be levelling out as July's figure now shows it as 3.57%. Considering more people are being told to go back to work, perhaps it was as a result of COVID19. Across that whole time though, it's worth noting StatCounter which also tracks it has hardly moved this whole time. So you may want to press X to doubt on it.

  • Librem 5 June 2020 Software Development Update

    This is another incarnation of the software development progress for the Librem 5. This time for June 2020 (weeks 23-26). Some items are covered in more detail in separate blog posts at https://puri.sm/news. The idea of this summary is to have a closer look at the coding and design side of things. It also shows how much we’re standing on the shoulders of giants reusing existing software and how contributions are flowing back and forth between upstream and downstream projects. This quickly gets interesting since we’re upstream for some projects (e.g. calls, phosh, chatty) and downstream for others (e.g Debian, Linux kernel, GNOME). So these reports are usually rather link heavy pointing to individual merge requests on https://source.puri.sm/ or to the upstream side (like e.g. GNOME’s gitlab).

  • Red Hat certification remote exams now available

    It’s not a new idea that organizations worldwide need and seek qualified IT professionals with the skills and knowledge needed to use Red Hat products successfully. And for the last two decades, Red Hat Training and Certification has provided a way for them to assess, train and validate skills. Last year, we launched preliminary exams as a way to provide experience with our hands-on approach to testing to a broader audience and to explore making this approach more widely available as online exams. This year, the COVID-19 pandemic has meant temporary site closures, lockdowns and social distancing. Going to a test center to take an exam is not an option in many places. Even if it is, candidates for certification might be understandably reluctant to visit a center to take an exam. With that in mind, Red Hat has accelerated our efforts, and I am very pleased to announce that several of our certification exams are now available remotely.

  • Red Hat Customer Success Stories: digital transformation through people, process and technology

    Condis Supermarcats is a family-owned supermarket chain that is a household name in central and northern Spain. The company operates more than 400 physical storefronts, ranging from hypermarkets to local convenience stores, and a growing digital business. In 2017, Condis began several high-profile projects as part of its digital transformation efforts, including launch of a new customer resource management (CRM) system and a customer-facing mobile application. To support these projects, Condis’s IT team sought to better integrate the company’s IT infrastructure with microservices. "Our architecture was not cloud-integrated or suited for the agile approach we needed to develop our digital business," said Sergio Murillo, Technology Development and IT Operations Manager at Condis. "For example, each Condis store has access to a customer database, centralized using a cloud-based tool. However, we needed this data exchange to be integrated seamlessly with our CRM."

  • 10 Years of OpenStack – Gary Kevorkian at Cisco

    Storytelling is one of the most powerful means to influence, teach, and inspire the people around us. To celebrate OpenStack’s 10th anniversary, we are spotlighting stories from the individuals in various roles from the community who have helped to make OpenStack and the global Open Infrastructure community successful.

  • The Month in WordPress: July 2020

    July was an action-packed month for the WordPress project. The month saw a lot of updates on one of the most anticipated releases – WordPress 5.5! WordCamp US 2020 was canceled and the WordPress community team started experimenting with different formats for engaging online events, in July. Read on to catch up with all the updates from the WordPress world.