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Programming: Rust, IDEs and Qt 5.14.0 Beta

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Development
  • Why to choose Rust as your next programming language

    Choosing a programming language for a project is often a complicated decision, particularly when it involves switching from one language to another. For many programmers, it is not only a technical exercise but also a deeply emotional one. The lack of known or measurable criteria for picking a language often means the choice digresses into a series of emotional appeals.

    I've been involved in many discussions about choosing a programming language, and they usually conclude in one of two ways: either the decision is made using measurable, yet unimportant criteria while ignoring relevant, yet hard to measure criteria; or it is made using anecdotes and emotional appeals.

  • Start developing in the cloud with Eclipse Che IDE

    In the many, many technical interviews I've gone through in my professional career, I've noticed that I'm rarely asked questions that have definitive answers. Most of the time, I'm asked open-ended questions that do not have an absolutely correct answer but evaluate my prior experiences and how well I can explain things.

    [...]

    When I was a student at the University of Texas at Austin, most of my computer science courses were taught in Java. And as an enterprise developer working for different companies, I have mostly worked with Java to build various enterprise-level applications. So, I know Java, and most of the time I've developed with Eclipse. I have also used the Spring Tools Suite (STS), which is a variation of the Eclipse IDE that is installed with Spring Framework plugins, and IntelliJ, which is not exactly open source, since I prefer its paid edition, but some Java developers favor it due to its faster performance and other fancy features.

    Regardless of which IDE you use, installing your own developer IDE presents one common, big problem: "It works on my computer, and I don't know why it doesn't work on your computer."

  • Qt 5.14.0 Beta1 Released

    I am happy to announce that Qt 5.14.0 Beta1 is released today. We will release updates as Beta N regularly until we are ready for RC. Current estimation for RC is 12th November 2019, see the schedule from 5.14 wiki.

    Beta1 (and later releases) can be installed by using online installer. Commercial users can find the online installer from their Qt Account and Opensource users from qt.io download page. Separate Beta1 source packages are also available in Qt Account and download.qt.io.

  • Qt 5.14 Rolls To Beta Stage With Graphics API Independent Scenegraph Renderer

    Qt 5.14 is an exciting update with the initial API-independent scenegraph renderer for Qt Quick that supports Vulkan, Metal, Direct3D 11, and still OpenGL fallbacks. The Vulkan support for Qt continues maturing. Qt 5.14 also has continued HiDPI improvements, a threading overhaul to Qt 3D, Qt Multimedia now supports GStreamer OpenGL, updated Qt WebEngine, Qt Quick Timeline introduction, and many other changes.

Python Programming Leftovers

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Development
  • PyCon ES 2019 Alicante Highlights

    Last weekend it was Pycon time again, my 6th one so far. This time closer to home: Alicante.

    I had an awesome time, meeting a lot of nice people, watching interesting talks and getting inspired overall to keep learning more Python.

  • Python for NLP: Neural Machine Translation with Seq2Seq in Keras

    This is the 22nd article in my series of articles on Python for NLP. In one of my previous articles on solving sequence problems with Keras, I explained how to solve many to many sequence problems where both inputs and outputs are divided over multiple time-steps. The seq2seq architecture is a type of many-to-many sequence modeling, and is commonly used for a variety of tasks such as Text-Summarization, chatbot development, conversational modeling, and neural machine translation, etc.

    In this article, we will see how to create a language translation model which is also a very famous application of neural machine translation. We will use seq2seq architecture to create our language translation model using Python's Keras library.

    It is assumed that you have good knowledge of recurrent neural networks, particularly LSTM. The code in this article is written in Python with the Keras library. Therefore, it is assumed that you have good knowledge of the Python language, as well as the Keras library. So, without any further ado, let's begin.

  • Find the position of the only odd number within a list with Python

    In this example, we will write a python function that will return the position of the only odd number within the number list. If there is no odd number within that list then the function will return -1 instead.

  • Python 2.7.17rc1

    Python 2.7.17 release candidate 1 is a prelease for a bugfix release in the Python 2.7 series.

  • Python 2.7.17 release candidate 1 available

    A release candidate for the upcoming 2.7.17 bug fix release is now available for download.

  • Wing Python IDE 7.1.2 - October 7, 2019

    Wing 7.1.2 adds a How-To for using Wing with Docker, allows disabling code warnings from the tooltip displayed over the editor, adds support for macOS 10.15 (Catalina), supports code folding in JSON files, adds optional word wrapping for output in the Testing tool, and fixes about 25 minor usability issues.

  • Pytest-cov support for who-tests-what

today's howtos and programming bits

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Development
HowTos
  • Tip of the day: batch PDF conversion with LibreOffice
  • How to install Google Cloud SDK on Linux for easy remote access to your Google Cloud Platform
  • How to perform network throughput tests with iperf
  • How to build curl with SFTP support
  • How to use Cockpit management software in Linux
  • Python-compatible IDEs: What is It and Why Do You Need It?

    There is no better way to build in Python than by using an IDE (Integrated Development Environment). They not only make your work much easier as well as logical; they also enhance the coding experience and efficiency.

    Sure, everyone knows this. However, the problem is, how do you pick the best environment for Python development when there are so many options? This often becomes an issue that beginner developers have to face.

    In this article, we’ll provide an overview of the best IDEs for Python that are popular among coders and a few other options that are worth considering. But before we delve into it, let’s first explain what an IDE means.

  • 5 lesser used Django template tags

    We already know how to use for, if-else, filter and url template tags in Django. We can also create custom template tags in Django if any requirement is not getting fulfilled with existing tags. 

    Here we are introducing you with 5 Django template tags which are lesser-known and used by beginner Django developers.

  • Data Cleaning Pocket Primer

    If you have worked with any data then you will know that the time it takes to get meaningful results is usually dominated by the time it takes to get the data into a form where it can be analyzed. Data cleaning is a major task and there are lots of books on the topic, but mostly they assume that you are using a programming language that you are also going to use for the analysis.

    This particular book doesn't do that. Instead it takes a look at what you can achieve using just the command line tools in Linux and Mac OS commands. This is an interesting idea, but you have to want to work this way for the book to be of much use to you. If you want to use R, say, then you need a book that does data cleaning in R.

Python Programming Leftovers

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Development
  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #389 (Oct. 8, 2019)
  • Solving Python Error- KeyError: 'key_name'

    As per Python 3 official documentation a key error is raised when a mapping (dictionary) key is not found in the set of existing keys.

    This error is encountered when we are trying to get or delete the value of a key from a dictionary and that key doesn't exist in the dictionary.

  • Webinar Preview: Project Setup for React+TS+TDD

    Earlier this year we announced a twelve-part in-depth tutorial on React, TypeScript, and Test-Driven Development (TDD) in PyCharm. For the most part it highlights PyCharm Professional’s bundling of WebStorm, our professional IDE for web development.

  • Get Started With Django: Build a Portfolio App

    Django is a fully featured Python web framework that can be used to build complex web applications. In this course, you’ll jump in and learn Django by example. You’ll follow the steps to create a fully functioning web application and, along the way, learn some of the most important features of the framework and how they work together.

XML5 and Python Leftovers

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Development
  • The case for XML5

    My XML5 idea is over twelve years old now.

    [...]

    XML in browsers has much less of a compatibility footprint. Coupled with XML not always returning a tree for a given byte stream making backwards compatible (in the sense that old well-formed documents parse the same way) extensions to it is possible. There is a chance for it to ossify like text/html though, so perhaps XML5 ought to be amended somewhat to leave room for future changes.

  • Linting with Flake8

    For so long the word "Linting" meant nothing to me. It sounded like some supercoder leet speak that was way out of my league. Then I discovered flake8 and realised I was a fool.

    This article is a simple one. It covers what linting is; what Flake8 is and has an embarrassing example of it in use.

    Before we get started, I need to get something off my chest. I don't know why but I really hate the word "linting". It's a hatred akin to people and the word "moist".

  • PyPy's new JSON parser

    In the last year or two I have worked on and off on making PyPy's JSON faster, particularly when parsing large JSON files. In this post I am going to document those techniques and measure their performance impact. Note that I am quite a lot more constrained in what optimizations I can apply here, compared to some of the much more advanced approaches like Mison, Sparser or SimdJSON because I don't want to change the json.loads API that Python programs expect, and because I don't want to only support CPUs with wide SIMD extensions. With a more expressive API, more optimizations would be possible.
    There are a number of problems of working with huge JSON files: deserialization takes a long time on the one hand, and the resulting data structures often take a lot of memory (usually they can be many times bigger than the size of the file they originated from). Of course these problems are related, because allocating and initializing a big data structure takes longer than a smaller data structure. Therefore I always tried to attack both of these problems at the same time.
    One common theme of the techniques I am describing is that of optimizing the parser for how JSON files are typically used, not how they could theoretically be used. This is a similar approach to the way dynamic languages are optimized more generally: most JITs will optimize for typical patterns of usage, at the cost of less common usage patterns, which might even become slower as a result of the optimizations.

  • Getting Started with Python PyAutoGUI

    In this tutorial, we're going to learn how to use pyautogui library in Python 3. The PyAutoGUI library provides cross-platform support for managing mouse and keyboard operations through code to enable automation of tasks. The pyautogui library is also available for Python 2; however, we will be using Python 3 throughout the course of this tutorial.

    A tool like this has many applications, a few of which include taking screenshots, automating GUI testing (like Selenium), automating tasks that can only be done with a GUI, etc.

    Before you go ahead with this tutorial, please note that there are a few prerequisites. You should have a basic understanding of Python's syntax, and/or have done at least beginner level programming in some other language. Other than that, the tutorial is quite simple and easy to follow for beginners.

Programming/Development: HyperText, Python and Coding for Kids

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Development
  • 7 Excellent Free Books to Learn HTML

    HyperText Markup Language (HTML) is used to create web pages and other information that is intended for display in a web browser. Each markup code is known as an element or a tag. The web developer uses these elements to describe and define the content of a webpage. The elements tell the web browser how to display the information (both text and images) to the user.

    HTML has seen a number of revisions. HTML5 is the fifth revision of the HTML standard. HTML5 makes for a rich user experience with the canvas and SVG elements, native elements video and audio which allow video and audio to be placed directly in the HTML code. Other important new features include web storage, which offers a more secure and faster alternative than cookies, and geolocation, the heart of every location-based application.

    HTML is the markup language, Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) determines how it is rendered, and JavaScript is the programming language. HTML5, CSS3, and JavaScript are open, efficient and reliable web standards and allow web designers to create advanced web sites with creative graphics, animations, transitions and typography.

  • Easily hiding items from the legend in matplotlib

    When producing some graphs for a client recently, I wanted to hide some labels from a legend in matplotlib. I started investigating complex arguments to the plt.legend function, but it turned out that there was a really simple way to do it…

  • How I access Microsoft SharePoint in my Python scripts
  • What programming language would you teach a kid first?

    For the 10th year in a row, the Finding Ada Network celebrates Ada Lovelace Day on the second Tuesday of October. It is a global celebration with flagship and grassroots events honoring the achievements and contributions of women in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM).

Python Programming Leftovers

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Development
  • Tutorial: Getting Music Data with the Last.fm API using Python

    APIs allow us to make requests from servers to retrieve data. APIs are useful for many things, but one is to be able to create a unique dataset for a data science project. In this tutorial, we’re going to learn some advanced techniques for working with the Last.fm API.

  • Choosing Python for Web Development: Top 16 Pros and Cons

    One of the world’s most popular coding languages, Python was first conceptualized in the late ’80s, influenced by the ABC and Modula-3 languages. It has come a long way from its first release in 1991 to the 2.0 release when it became an open-source project, and to this day it is gathering a huge, professional community that is constantly improving the technology.

  • Building a Python C Extension Module

    There are several ways in which you can extend the functionality of Python. One of these is to write your Python module in C or C++. This process can lead to improved performance and better access to C library functions and system calls. In this tutorial, you’ll discover how to use the Python API to write Python C extension modules.

  • Quansight Labs Work Update for September, 2019

    As of November, 2018, I have been working at Quansight. Quansight is a new startup founded by the same people who started Anaconda, which aims to connect companies and open source communities, and offers consulting, training, support and mentoring services. I work under the heading of Quansight Labs. Quansight Labs is a public-benefit division of Quansight. It provides a home for a "PyData Core Team" which consists of developers, community managers, designers, and documentation writers who build open-source technology and grow open-source communities around all aspects of the AI and Data Science workflow.

    My work at Quansight is split between doing open source consulting for various companies, and working on SymPy. SymPy, for those who do not know, is a symbolic mathematics library written in pure Python. I am the lead maintainer of SymPy.

    In this post, I will detail some of the open source work that I have done recently, both as part of my open source consulting, and as part of my work on SymPy for Quansight Labs.

Programming: Java, GNU Debugger (GDB) and Python

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Development
  • Write a simple Kubernetes Operator in Java using the Fabric8 Kubernetes Client

    Kubernetes is becoming much more than just a platform for running container workloads. Its API can be extended with application-specific Custom Resource Definitions(CRDs), and you can implement your own logic adapting your applications dynamically to changes in the cluster. In this article, we’ll be writing a simple Kubernetes Operator in Java using the Fabric8 Kubernetes Client.

  • 7 Java tips for new developers

    This makes Java a popular language for both programmers and users. Programmers know that they only have to write one version of their software to end up with an application that runs on any platform, and users know that an application will run on their computer regardless of what operating system they use.
    Many languages and frameworks are cross-platform, but none deliver the same level of abstraction. With Java, you target the JVM, not the OS. For programmers, that's the path of least resistance when faced with several programming challenges, but it's only useful if you know how to program Java. If you're just getting started with Java programming, here are seven basic tips you need to know.

  • GDB Debugger Lands CTF Support

    The GNU Debugger (GDB) now has support for the Compact C Type Format following support for this debugging information format having been added to the GCC compiler and Binutils.

    [...]

    CTF is a simpler format than DWARF with a goal of being faster and simpler than dealing with debuginfo packages. CTF was developed by Sun/Oracle and the format is documented here.

  • Python and fast HTTP clients

    Nowadays, it is more than likely that you will have to write an HTTP client for your application that will have to talk to another HTTP server. The ubiquity of REST API makes HTTP a first class citizen. That's why knowing optimization patterns are a prerequisite.

    There are many HTTP clients in Python; the most widely used and easy to
    work with is requests. It is the de-factor standard nowadays.

  • The Numbers, They Lie

    In Python, the default representation of a number with a decimal point in it is something called an “IEEE 754 double precision binary floating-point number”. This standard achieves a generally useful trade-off between performance, correctness, and is widely implemented in hardware, making it a popular choice for numbers in many programming language.

    However, as our spooky story above indicates, it’s not perfect. 0.1 + 0.2 is very slightly less than 0.3 in this representation, because it is a floating-point representation in base 2.

    If you’ve worked professionally with software that manipulates money1, you typically learn this lesson early; it’s quite easy to smash head-first into the problem with binary floating-point the first time you have an item that costs 30 cents and for some reason three dimes doesn’t suffice to cover it.

  • How to Add Maps to Django Web App Projects with Mapbox

    Building interactive maps into a Django web application can seem daunting if you do not know where to begin, but it is easier than you think if you use a developer tool such as Mapbox.

    In this post we will build a simple Django project with a single app and add an interactive map like the one you see below to the webpage that Django renders with the Mapbox Maps API.

  • Examples are Awesome

    There are two things I look for whenever I check out an Opensource project or library that I want to use.

    1. Screenshots (A picture is worth a thousand words).

    2. Examples (Don't tell me what to do, show me how to do it).

    Having a fully working example (or many examples) helps me shape my thought process.

Programming: Java Persistence API, Paul Ivanov (Python) and Meson 0.52 Release

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Development
  • Using the Java Persistence API

    The Java Persistence API (JPA) is an important Java functionality for application developers to understand. It translates exactly how Java developers turn method calls on objects into accessing, persisting, and managing data stored in NoSQL and relational databases.

    This article examines the JPA in detail through a tutorial example of building a bicycle loaning service. This example will create a create, read, update, and delete (CRUD) layer for a larger application using the Spring Boot framework, the MongoDB database (which is no longer open source), and the Maven package manager. I also use NetBeans 11 as my IDE of choice.

  • PyDev of the Week: Paul Ivanov

    This week we welcome Paul Ivanov (@ivanov) as our PyDev of the Week! Paul is a core developer of IPython and Jupyter. He is also an instructor at Software Carpentry. You can learn more about Paul on his website. You can also see what he’s been up to in open source by visiting his Github profile. Let’s take some time to get to know Paul!

  • Meson 0.52 Released
  • Meson 0.52 Released With Better Support For Solaris/Illumos

    While popularity in Solaris-based operating systems may be on the decline, for Meson to ultimately replace other build systems it will need good support for said operating systems where Automake, CMake, and others are well supported. As such, with this weekend's Meson 0.52 release comes with better support for Solaris and the OpenSolaris-derived Illumos platforms.

Programming: Best JavaScript Frameworks, AdaCore, LibreOffice Development and Qt 3D Studio 2.5 Beta

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Development
  • Top 30 Best JavaScript Frameworks and Libraries [2019]

    Although there are over 200+ programming languages to help developers all over the world, millions of developers are taken away by the benefits of JavaScript. JavaScript has been a popular programming language for the web over the past two decades now. Developers are widely influenced by the high-level compatibility this language has to offer. Moreover, it comes with a large number of frameworks and libraries that are extremely useful. And each month, dozens of javascript frameworks and libraries are regularly being created.

  • AdaCore Has Been Developing A GNAT/Ada Front-End To LLVM

    While the GNAT Ada front-end for GCC is in quite good shape, AdaCore has been experimenting with bringing their GNAT front-end to LLVM for allowing Ada code compilation with the LLVM compiler stack.

    AdaCore has been working on this LLVM port to expand the outreach of the Ada programming language to the LLVM ecosystem. This is complementary to the GNAT GCC support with AdaCore planning to continue their Ada GCC compiler support.

  • GUI widget prototyping

    If you think nothing happens in LibreOffice, that’s not true. I for example prepair some new Templates and Galleries for LibreOffice.

  • Qt 3D Studio 2.5 Beta released

    We are happy to announce that the Qt 3D Studio 2.5 Beta is now available via the online installer. Here’s a quick summary of the new features and functions in 2.5 release. For detailed information about the Qt 3D Studio, visit the online documentation page.

  • Qt 3D Studio 2.5 Beta Brings Stereoscopic Support, Better Content Controls

    The Qt Company this week released the public beta of the forthcoming Qt 3D Studio for this development tool focused on creating rich 3D user interfaces with the Qt tool-kit.

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More in Tux Machines

Programming: C++, C and Python

  • Extend C++ capabilities with LLVM STLExtras.h

    The LLVM compiler project provides a header file called STLExtras.h that extends the capabilities of C++ without any dependency on the rest of LLVM. In this article, we take a quick look at its basic functionality.

  • Rewriting Old Solaris C Code In Python Yielded A 17x Performance Improvement

    While we normally hear of rewriting code from Python and other scripting languages into C/C++ when its a matter of performance, in the case of Oracle Solaris it was taking old C code and modernizing it in Python 3 to yield a ~17x performance improvement. Shared today on Oracle's official Solaris blog was an interesting anecdote about their listusers command being rewritten in Python 3 from C. Oracle's Darren Moffat noted the C code was largely untouched since around 1988 and given its design at a time when systems were less dense than today with hundreds or even thousands of users per system.

  • Python Projects for Beginners: The Best Way to Learn

    Learning Python can be difficult. You can spend time reading a textbook or watching videos, but then struggle to actually put what you've learned into practice. Or you might spend a ton of time learning syntax and get bored or lose motivation. How can you increase your chances of success? By building Python projects. That way you're learning by actually doing what you want to do! When I was learning Python, building projects helped me bring together everything I was learning. Once I started building projects, I immediately felt like I was making more progress.

  • PyCon 2019: The People of PyCon

    I can’t tell you how amazing it was to meet the individuals I read, listen to, or who make the tools I use. I was so happy to meet the authors that helped me to grow over the last few years, especially Dan Bader, Peter Baumgartner, Matt Harrison, Reuven Lerner, Harry Percival , and Lacey Williams Henschel. I love podcasts, so it was wonderful to meet Michael Kennedy and Brian Okken in person. And I was happy to meet Paul Ganssle, Russell Keith-Magee, Barry Warsaw, and other maintainers and contributors. It was a delight to meet Bob Belderbos and Julian Sequeira from PyBites.

  • Find the first non-consecutive number with Python

    Your task is to find the first element of an array that is not consecutive. E.g. If we have an array [1,2,3,4,6,7,8] then 1 then 2 then 3 then 4 are all consecutive but 6 is not, so that’s the first non-consecutive number. If the whole array is consecutive then return None.

  • Perceiving Python programming paradigms

    Early each year, TIOBE announces its Programming Language of The Year. When its latest annual TIOBE index report came out, I was not at all surprised to see Python again winning the title, which was based on capturing the most search engine ranking points (especially on Google, Bing, Yahoo, Wikipedia, Amazon, YouTube, and Baidu) in 2018.

OSI Announces Appointment of New Board Directors

The Open Source Initiative (OSI) is pleased to announce the appointments of Deb Bryant and Tracy Hinds to fill the two vacant seats on the OSI Board of Directors. Their terms will begin immediately and run through October 2021. We hope you will join us in welcoming both to the OSI. Deb Bryant is returning to the OSI Board after spending several years away. After spending her days as the Senior Director of the Open Source Programs Office at Red Hat, Deb volunteers for open source organizations and supports the open source community. Bryant is passionate about open and transparent governments, bringing open source technology and ideas into the public sector. Tracy Hinds has an impressive history of managing development, operations, and growth for non-profit and for-profit organizations. Previous Education and Community Manager as well as Board Director of the OpenJS(formerly Node.js) Foundation, Hinds now works as Head of Platform at Samsung NEXT and is the president of GatherScript, where she works to support startup engagement and community, inspired by her prior work as a web engineer, community builder, OSS advocate, and strategist. Read more

A Trustworthy Free/Libre Linux Capable 64bit RISC-V Computer

My goal is to build a Free/OpenSource computer from the ground up, so I may completely trust that the entire hardware+software system's behavior is 100% attributable to its fully available HDL (Hardware Description Language) and Software sources. More importantly, I need all the compilers and associated toolchains involved in building the overall system (from HDL and Software sources) to be Free/OpenSource, and to be themselves buildable and runnable on the computer system being described. In other words, I need a self-hosting Free/OpenSource hardware+software stack! Read more Also: COM offers 9th or 8th Gen Coffee Lake with 10Gbps USB 3.2 and up to 96GB RAM

Dragora 3.0-beta1 released

I am pleased to announce the release of Dragora 3.0 Beta 1.

Dragora is a complete and reliable distribution of the GNU/Linux operating system that is entirely free software. Dragora is founded on the concepts of simplicity and elegance, it can be run for almost any purpose (desktop,
workstation, server, development, etc.). The intended audience is people
interested in learning more about the technical aspects of a friendly
GNU/Linux distribution.  Also people looking to use the purest ethical
software for daily use.

The beginning of the development of the series 3.0 represents the
migration towards a new C library, Musl.  The continuation of
supervision capabilities (introduced for the services in 2012).
The restructuring of the hierarchy of directories, the improvement of
the tools provided by the distribution, a new automatic method to build
the distribution, the prebuilt cross-compiler set, and much more!

The homepage is at www.dragora.org

Current development pages are located at
https://git.savannah.nongnu.org/cgit/dragora.git/ and
https://notabug.org/dragora/

Changes in this version:

  * A new installer for this series has been introduced, it can be
    invoked from the command line as `dragora-installer'.

  * A new tool (based on dialog(1)) has been introduced to
    configure the keyboard mapping in the console, it is called
    `dragora-keymap'.

  * Our simple and friendly package manager has reached version 1.3,
    which contains minor changes and fixes.  It is worth mentioning
    that Qi now uses `tarlz' to produce, list packages in parallel.
    Tarlz uses a simplified and safer variant of the POSIX pax format
    compressed with our favorite compressor "lzip".

  * To complement the security in general, for binaries with PIE and
SSP (both are default features in Dragora), they are now complemented
    with RELRO by default.

  * The main toolchain has been upgraded.  This -beta1 have Binutils
    2.33.1, The GNU C Compiler 9, GNU Linux libre 4.19.78, and
    Musl 1.1.24.

  * LibreSSL has been upgraded to the version 3.0.1

  * Ruby (programming language) version 2.6.5 has been introduced.

  * Support for FUSE (in the kernel) and user space, is now available
    in Dragora.

  * Xfce 4.14 has been introduced in this version.

  * dragora-ice, a customized version of IceWM has been added.

  * All the official X.Org components has been updated (drivers, server,
    applications, etc.).  Included new drivers: xf86-input-elographics,
    xf86-video-amdgpu, xf86-video-vboxvideo.  The configuration for the
    xf86-video-intel driver has been fixed this time.

  * Work to complete DocBook support in Dragora is underway.

  * Build recipes for new packages have been built:

    Please, traverse the /usr/pkg hierarchy for a full view of
    installed packages.

  * Many general fixes, improvements, and clean ups have been performed.

The ISO images may be fetched at:

    https://sourceforge.net/projects/dragora/files/beta/

See http://dragora.org/en/mirrors.html for a list of available mirrors.

The sha256sums are:

59a1c1693d62c2d61a0d5b4b826313ce8b736768b1a42097f1478a20a37f7a80 dragora-3.0-i586-beta1-live.iso 3127ea5b619b8e049b45a17e1e4d9c538b35ac067a7cd63d2262a30782e7cc2d dragora-3.0-i586-beta1-packages.iso 1c0f63a69cd4b674b742550562605f240e98cdbc63ab670c9f8cdd5d2d134efc dragora-3.0-x86_64-beta1-live.iso 2dd58b1e6429876aa1883b4682914184bce6cac2adfe53ea7c2e0c46d7987385 dragora-3.0-x86_64-beta1-packages.iso

Dragora is available in "live" or hybrid ISO image form. You need the .iso
for the packages if you want to perform a hard disk installation.

Notes:

* The password for the root user in the Live CD is: dragora

This beta version can be considered as stable, it is catalogued just as
beta because it lacks many things that we will try to complement in future
versions.

We welcome feedback at our Freenode IRC channel, #dragora, and on our
mailing list.  We are looking for help with documentation, testing,
bug reports, patches, etc.

Thank you to all of you who support this humble project made with great
sacrifice.  And thank you especially for supporting the philosophy and
spirit of software freedom that Dragora aims to promote.

Best regards,
Matias Fonzo, Dragora author and maintainer.

--
``Someone told me I would never be free
The way you are is way you'll always be
But it's all wrong!
There's Time To Burn'' - Ronnie James Dio

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