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Development

Programming Leftovers

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Development
  • Xilinx unveils open source FPGA platform

    The Vitis unified software platform from FPGA vendor Xilinx is the result of five-year project to create software development tools using familiar languages like C++ and Python to develop a wide range of applications for its reprogrammable chip.

  • Listen: How ActiveState is tackling “dependency hell” by providing enterprise-level support for open source programming languages [Podcast]

    “Open source back in the late nineties – and even throughout the 2000s – was really hard to use,” ActiveState CEO Bart Copeland says. “Our job,” he continues, “was to make it much easier for developers to use open source and much easier for enterprises to use open source.”

  • 10 open source projects proving the power of Google Go

    Now 10 years in the wild, Google’s Go programming language has certainly made a name for itself. Lightweight and quick to compile, Go has stirred significant interest due to its generous libraries and abstractions that ease the development of concurrent and distributed (read: cloud) applications.

    But the true measure of success of any programming language is the projects that developers create with it. Go has proven itself as a first choice for fast development of network services, software infrastructure projects, and compact and powerful tools of all kinds.

  • The Eclipse Foundation Launches The Eclipse Cloud Development Tools Working Group for Cloud Native Software

    The Eclipse Foundation today announced the launch of the Eclipse Cloud Development Tools Working Group (ECD WG), a vendor-neutral open source collaboration that will focus on development tools for and in the cloud. The ECD WG will drive the evolution and broad adoption of emerging standards for cloud-based developer tools, including language support, extensions, marketplaces, and developer workspace definition. Founding members of the ECD WG include Broadcom, EclipseSource, Ericsson, IBM, Intel, Red Hat, SAP, Software AG, and Typefox among many others.

  • You cannot cURL under pressure

    With cURL having this many features (with the general mass of them being totally unknown to me, let alone how you use them) got me thinking… What if you could do a game show style challenge for them?

  • Follow-up on ‘ASCII Transliteration without ICU or iconv’

    By an anonymous commenter, I got pointed to that Unicode (in Qt) is slightly more complicated than I had considered when writing the code: I missed to handle planes beyond the Basic Multilingual Plane (BMP) and the ‘surrogates’ between code points 0xD800 and 0xDFFF. In a series of recently pushed Git commits I addressed problem of surrogates and fixed some more issues. Some preparatory work has been done to support more planes in the future, but as of now, only the BMP is supported. For details, please have a look at the five commits posted on 2019-10-12.

We, Wall, we, Wall, Raku: Perl creator blesses new name for version 6 of text-wrangling lingo

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Development

Perl 6 should soon be known as Raku, now that Perl creator Larry Wall has given his blessing to the name change.

[...]

Wall thus has ended a debate that has occupied the Perl developer community for the past few months and has been an issue for more than a decade. Back in August, Dutch software developer Elizabeth Mattijsen opened an issue in GitHub's Perl 6 repository seeking to rename Perl 6 because it's "confusing and irritating."

The problem – apart from Perl's dwindling popularity – simply is that Perl 5 and Perl 6 are separate, but related, programming languages. And when developers talk about Perl, they usually mean Perl 5. To give Perl 6 a chance to thrive on its own, the Perl community mostly agreed that a new name would be helpful.

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Programming Leftovers

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Development
  • Plotting with PyQtGraph

    One of the major strengths of Python is in exploratory data science and visualization, using tools such as Pandas, numpy, sklearn for data analysis and matplotlib plotting. Buiding GUI applications with PyQt gives you access to all these Python tools directly from within your app, allowing you to build complex data-driven apps and interactive dashboards.

    While it is possible to embed matplotlib plots in PyQt the experience does not feel entirely native. For simple and highly interactive plots you may want to consider using PyQtGraph instead. PyQtGraph is built on top of PyQ5 native QGraphicsScene giving better drawing performance, particularly for live data, as well as providing interactivity and the ability to easily customize plots with Qt graphics widgets.

    In this tutorial we'll walk through the first steps of creating a plot widget with PyQtGraph and then demonstrate plot customization using line colours, line type, axis labels, background colour and plotting multiple lines.

  • Python 3.5.8rc2

    Python 3.5 has now entered "security fixes only" mode, and as such the only changes since Python 3.5.4 are security fixes. Also, Python 3.5.8rc2 has only been released in source code form; no more official binary installers will be produced.

  • Developers in 2020 need open source and want the ability to work remotely

    But at the same time I think participation in open source products, projects, is also a key aspect that people can bring to the table in terms of additional credibility and also just being able to showcase what they're able to do in terms of collaborations.

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: GitHub Streak: Round Six

SerenityOS: From zero to HTML in a year

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OS
Development
Web

The Serenity operating system turns 1 year old today. I'm counting from the first commit in the git repository, on October 10, 2018. Parts of the code had been around for a while before that, so this first commit was really about putting everything I was tinkering with into a shared repo.

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today's howtos and programming bits

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Development
HowTos
  • How to Manage Your Running Processes with XFCE’s Task Manager
  • Anaconda debugging and testing – part 1.
  • Configure Touchpad Settings Using gsettings Commandline Utility
  • Stack Abuse: Autoencoders for Image Reconstruction in Python and Keras

    Nowadays, we have huge amounts of data in almost every application we use - listening to music on Spotify, browsing friend's images on Instagram, or maybe watching an new trailer on YouTube. There is always data being transmitted from the servers to you.

    This wouldn't be a problem for a single user. But imagine handling thousands, if not millions, of requests with large data at the same time. These streams of data have to be reduced somehow in order for us to be physically able to provide them to users - this is where data compression kicks in.

    There're lots of compression techniques, and they vary in their usage and compatibility. For example some compression techniques only work on audio files, like the famous MPEG-2 Audio Layer III (MP3) codec.

  • PyCharm: Webinar Preview: “Debugging During Testing” tutorial step for React+TS+TDD

    I often speak about “visual debugging” and “visual testing”, meaning, how IDEs can help put these intermediate concepts within reach using a visual UI.

    For testing, sometimes our code has problems that require investigation with a debugger. For React, that usually means a trip to the browser to set a breakpoint and use the Chrome developer tools. In Debugging During Testing With NodeJS we show how the IDE’s debugger, combined with TDD, can make this investigation far more productive. In the next step we show how to do so using Chrome as the execution environment.

  • Python hacking

    Python‘s had this handy logging module since July 2003.

Programming: Python, GCC, Sourcehut, Grace Hopper's Legacy and More

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Development
  • Dynamic Scope Fixtures in pytest 5.2 - Anthony Sotille

    pytest 5.2 was just released, and with it, a cool fun feature called dynamic scope fixtures. Anthony Sotille so tilly is one of the pytest core developers, so I thought it be fun to have Anthony describe this new feature for us.

    We also talk about parametrized testing and really what is fixture scope and then what is dynamic scope.

    Special Guest: Anthony Sottile.

  • A upside-down approach to GCC optimizations

    Many traditional optimizations in the compiler work from a top-down approach, which starts at the beginning of the program and works toward the bottom. This allows the optimization to see the definition of something before any uses of it, which simplifies most evaluations. It’s also the natural way we process things. In this article, we’ll look at a different approach and a new project called Ranger, which attempts to turn this problem upside down.

    [...]

    This simple example shows how we are attempting to remove the need for the top-down analysis order, which helps eliminate the need for heuristics and should result in more consistent optimization results.

    Much of the research that has gone into this project has been to control the performance of the on-demand analysis, so that it is not more expensive than the much simpler top-down approach. The Ranger only does work that is actually needed, so we also see some significant time savings in optimization passes that don’t need very many ranges. We hope to extend this approach in the future to other optimizations.

    This work is live in a current GCC development branch and is now capable of building an entire Fedora distribution. We plan to integrate it with mainstream GCC in the next release, GCC 11.

  • Trying out Sourcehut

    While polling other contributors (I proposed moving to gitlab.com), someone suggested moving to Sourcehut, a newish git hosting platform written and maintained by Drew DeVault. I've been following Drew's work for a while now and although I had read a few blog posts on Sourcehut's development, I had never really considered giving it a try. So I did!

    Sourcehut is still in alpha and I'm expecting a lot of things to change in the future, but here's my quick review.

    [...]

    All in all, I don't think I'll be moving ISBG to Sourcehut (yet?). At the moment it doesn't quite feel as ready as I'd want it to be, and that's OK. Most of the things I disliked about the service can be fixed by some UI work and I'm sure people are already working on it.

    Github was bought by MS for 7.5 billion USD and Gitlab is currently valued at 2.7 billion USD. It's not really fair to ask Sourcehut to fully compete just yet Smile

    With Sourcehut, Drew DeVault is fighting the good fight and I wish him the most resounding success. Who knows, maybe I'll really migrate to it in a few years!

  • Everything you need to know about Grace Hopper in six books

    Grace Hopper is one of those iconic figures that really needs no introduction. During her long career in the United States Navy, she was a key figure in the early days of modern computing. If you have been involved in open source or technology in general, chances are you have already heard several anecdotes about Grace Hopper. The story of finding the first computer bug, perhaps? Or maybe you have heard some of her nicknames: Queen of Code, Amazing Grace, or Grandma COBOL?

    While computing has certainly changed from the days of punch cards, Grace Hopper's legacy lives on. She was posthumously awarded a Presidential Medal of Freedom, the Navy named a warship after her, and the Grace Hopper Celebration is an annual conference with an emphasis on topics that are relevant to women in computing. Suffice it to say, Grace Hopper's name is going to live on for a very long time.

    Grace Hopper had a career anyone should be proud of, and she accomplished many great things. Like many historical figures who have accomplished great things, sometimes the anecdotes about her contributions start to drift towards the realm of tall tales, which does Grace Hopper a disservice. Her real accomplishments are already legendary, and there is no reason to try to turn her into the computer science version of John Henry or Paul Bunyan.

  • [Old] Causing ZFS corruption for fun and profit (and quality assurance purposes)

    Datto backs up data, a lot of it. At the time of writing Datto has over 500 PB of data stored on ZFS. This count includes both backup appliances that are sent to customer sites, as well as cloud storage servers that are used for secondary and tertiary backup of those appliances. At this scale drive swaps are a daily occurrence, and data corruption is inevitable. How we handle this corruption when it happens determines whether we truly lose data, or successfully restore from secondary backup. In this post we'll be showing you how at Datto we intentionally cause corruption in our testing environments, to ensure we're building software that can properly handle these scenarios.

    Disclaimer: You should absolutely not attempt these instructions on any system containing any data you would like to keep. I provide no guarantees that the commands within this post will not completely destroy your zpool and all its contained data. But we'll try to only destroy it a little bit.

Programming: RenderDoc Debugger, Python News, Eclipse Cloud Development (ECD), Go and BASIC

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Development
  • RenderDoc 1.5 Released For This Leading OpenGL / Vulkan / Direct3D Open-Source Debugger

    RenderDoc has already been the leading open-source graphics debugging tool for OpenGL / Vulkan / Direct3D across multiple platforms and it continues only getting more useful with each new feature release.

    RenderDoc 1.5 is the project's first release in six months and as such it's a fairly big update for this prominent graphics debugger.

    RenderDoc 1.5 now allows better configuring of capture replays, SPIR-V reflection and disassembly is now more reliable as well as working against the latest SPIR-V version, a Vulkan replay-time optimization, an OpenGL low-memory optimization, and various other optimizations throughout. One of the other optimizations worth mentioning is much better capture load and close time performance for D3D12/Vulkan captures with many serialized resources.

  • Wing Tips: Python Code Warnings in Wing Pro 7

    Examples of warnings that Wing might flag include syntax errors, indentation problems, uses of an undefined variable, imports that cannot be resolved, or variables that are set but never used.
    Code warnings save development time because they help to identify errors before code is even run. New code is checked as you work, although Wing will wait until you have finished typing so that it doesn't warn about code that is still being entered.

  • How to Analyze Survey Data with Python for Beginners

    Conducting surveys and polls is one of the best ways to collect data and gain insight into questions like why are customers leaving our website? or why are voters attracted to this candidate? But analyzing survey data can be a real challenge!

    In this tutorial, we’re going to walk through how to analyze survey data using Python. But don’t worry — even if you’ve never written code before, you can handle this! We’re going to take it step by step, and by the end of this tutorial you’ll see how you can unlock some pretty impressive analytical power with just a few lines of code!

    For the purposes of this article, we’ll be analyzing StackOverflow’s 2019 developer survey data, because it’s a large and recent survey data set that’s public and properly anonymized. But these techniques will work for almost any sort of survey data.

  • 2019.3 EAP 5

    A new version of the Early Access Program (EAP) for PyCharm 2019.3 is available now! Download it from our website.

  • Webinar Preview: “Starting Testing” tutorial step for React+TS+TDD

    The first tutorial steps got us setup in the IDE, with a sample project generated and cleaned up. Now it’s time to learn React and TypeScript by…writing tests?

    Indeed! This tutorial is trying to sell you on the idea that you’ll be more productive and happier writing and using your components from inside the IDE, instead of constantly heading over to the browser. For most of the steps in the tutorial, you do all of the learning, typing, and running from within a test, staying in the IDE and in the “flow”.

  • PyCon US 2020 Hatchery Program Launches Call for Proposals

    The PyCon US Hatchery Program has become a fundamental part of how PyCon as a conference adapts to best serve the Python community as it grows and changes with time.

    Initially we wanted to gauge community interest for this type of program, and since launching in 2018 we have learned more about what kind of events the community might propose. At the end of the inaugural program, we accepted the PyCon Charlas as our first Hatchery event which has grown into a permanent track offered at PyCon US.

  • Episode #151: Certified! It works on my machine
  • Red Hat strengthens commitment to open source tooling, joins new working group

    The Eclipse Cloud Development (ECD) project group started at the Eclipse Foundation in 2016 with Eclipse Che and Orion open source coding tools. Each year since has seen greater interest and new projects added, including Theia, CodeWind, Dirigible, Sprotty, and now Che4z. As the ECD has grown to become a center of open source cloud-native development tooling, user and vendor interest has also increased; users of Eclipse Cloud Development projects now number well over 500k, and several other vendors have joined Red Hat to push tooling forward in this critical market. This has been fantastic, as it has driven more contributions and collaboration from the community.

  • Manage multiple versions of Go with GVM

    Go Version Manager (GVM) is an open source tool for managing Go environments. It supports installing multiple versions of Go and managing modules per-project using GVM "pkgsets." Developed originally by Josh Bussdieker, GVM (like its Ruby counterpart, RVM) allows you to create a development environment for each project or group of projects, segregating the different Go versions and package dependencies to allow for more flexibility and prevent versioning issues.

  • Excellent Free Books to Learn BASIC

    BASIC (Beginner’s All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code) is a family of general-purpose, high-level programming languages whose design philosophy emphasizes ease of use. In 1964, John G. Kemeny and Thomas E. Kurtz designed the original BASIC language at Dartmouth College. They wanted to enable students in fields other than science and mathematics to use computers. At the time, nearly all use of computers required writing custom software, which was something only scientists and mathematicians tended to learn.

    The advent of the personal computer was crucial to the success of BASIC. The language was designed for hobbyists, and as personal computers became more accessible to this audience, books of BASIC programs and BASIC games surged in popularity.

    BASIC is generally not regarded as the easiest way to take the first steps in learning the art of programming. But it does not hinder beginners from learning how to program, or teach them bad habits. And it’s the highest low-level language. Even today, there remains value in learning BASIC.

Programming Leftovers

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Development
  • DevSecOps pipelines and tools: What you need to know

    DevOps is well-understood in the IT world by now, but it's not flawless. Imagine you have implemented all of the DevOps engineering practices in modern application delivery for a project. You've reached the end of the development pipeline—but a penetration testing team (internal or external) has detected a security flaw and come up with a report. Now you have to re-initiate all of your processes and ask developers to fix the flaw.

    This is not terribly tedious in a DevOps-based software development lifecycle (SDLC) system—but it does consume time and affects the delivery schedule. If security were integrated from the start of the SDLC, you might have tracked down the glitch and eliminated it on the go. But pushing security to the end of the development pipeline, as in the above scenario, leads to a longer development lifecycle.

    This is the reason for introducing DevSecOps, which consolidates the overall software delivery cycle in an automated way.

    In modern DevOps methodologies, where containers are widely used by organizations to host applications, we see greater use of Kubernetes and Istio. However, these tools have their own vulnerabilities. For example, the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) recently completed a Kubernetes security audit that identified several issues. All tools used in the DevOps pipeline need to undergo security checks while running in the pipeline, and DevSecOps pushes admins to monitor the tools' repositories for upgrades and patches.

  • Interview with a Pornhub Web Developer

    Regardless of your stance on pornography, it would be impossible to deny the massive impact the adult website industry has had on pushing the web forward. From pushing the browser's video limits to pushing ads through WebSocket so ad blockers don't detect them, you have to be clever to innovate at the bleeding edge of the web.

    I was recently lucky enough to interview a Web Developer at the web's largest adult website: Pornhub. I wanted to learn about the tech, how web APIs can improve, and what it's like working on adult websites. Enjoy!

  • Indie game makers open up about the money they actually make

    The following 12 testimonies detail appropriately varied situations — the hopes and fears of these indie game makers — and how, ultimately, they’re able to continue sustaining themselves.

  • PHP version 7.2.24RC1 and 7.3.11RC1

    Release Candidate versions are available in testing repository for Fedora and Enterprise Linux (RHEL / CentOS) to allow more people to test them. They are available as Software Collections, for a parallel installation, perfect solution for such tests, and also as base packages.

    RPM of PHP version 7.3.11RC1 are available as SCL in remi-test repository and as base packages in the remi-test repository for Fedora 30-31 or remi-php73-test repository for Fedora 29 and Enterprise Linux.

    RPM of PHP version 7.2.24RC1 are available as SCL in remi-test repository and as base packages in the remi-test repository for Fedora 29 or remi-php72-test repository for Enterprise Linux.

Programming: Rust, RcppArmadillo and Python

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Development
  • This Week in Rust 307
  • Nicholas Nethercote: Visualizing Rust compilation

    Speeding up the Rust compiler isn’t the only way to make a Rust project build faster. Changing the crate structure of a project can also make a big difference. The good news here is that Eric Huss has implemented an amazing tool for visualizing Rust compilation, which can be used to identify inefficient crate structures in Rust projects.

  • RcppArmadillo 0.9.800.1.0

    Another month, another Armadillo upstream release! Hence a new RcppArmadillo release arrived on CRAN earlier today, and was just shipped to Debian as well. It brings a faster solve() method and other goodies. We also switched to the (awesome) tinytest unit test frameowrk, and Min Kim made the configure.ac script more portable for the benefit of NetBSD and other non-bash users; see below for more details. One again we ran two full sets of reverse-depends checks, no issues were found, and the packages was auto-admitted similarly at CRAN after less than two hours despite there being 665 reverse depends. Impressive stuff, so a big Thank You! as always to the CRAN team.

  • Anaconda Enters a New Chapter

    Today I am excited to announce that I am stepping into the role of CEO at Anaconda. Although I am a founder of the company and have previously served as president, this marks the first time I am serving in the role of chief executive.

    The entire world is undergoing a revolution in computation and data analytics — a revolution that we helped start almost 10 years ago, at the dawn of modern data science.

    [...]

    I am very appreciative of our previous CEO Scott Collison. Under his leadership, we grew from an open-source consultancy into a true product company, put a world-class leadership team in place, and launched our enterprise machine learning platform. He made a lasting impact on our company’s evolution.

  • Emacs: The Best Python Editor?

    Finding the right code editor for Python development can be tricky. Many developers explore numerous editors as they grow and learn. To choose the right code editor, you have to start by knowing which features are important to you. Then, you can try to find editors that have those features. One of the most feature-rich editors available is Emacs.

    Emacs started in the mid-1970s as a set of macro extensions for a different code editor. It was adopted into the GNU project by Richard Stallman in the early 1980s, and GNU Emacs has been continuously maintained and developed ever since. To this day, GNU Emacs and the XEmacs variant are available on every major platform, and GNU Emacs continues to be a combatant in the Editor Wars.

Programming: PyCon, Programming Exercises, Outreachy and Eclipse Foundation on IDEs

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Development
  • Financial Aid Launches for PyCon US 2020!

    The financial aid program aims to bring many folks to PyCon by limiting the maximum grant amount per person; in that way, we can offer support to more people based on individual need. The financial aid program reimburses direct travel costs including transportation, hotel, and childcare, as well as offering discounted or waived registration tickets. For complete details, see our FAQ, and contact pycon-aid@python.org with further questions.

  • 7 Reasons to Get Professional Programming Assignment Help

    Programming is one of the most popular disciplines in schools and universities, and many students learn programming languages at this point. If you are one of them, you know how complicated it can be to study programming, especially if you get a lot of other assignments from other classes.

  • Adding stateless support to vicodec

    Prior to joining Collabora, I took part in Round 17 of the Outreachy internships, which ran from December 2018 to March 2019. Outreachy is a paid, remote internship program. Its goal is to support people from groups underrepresented in tech, and help newcomers to free software and open source make their first contributions. Open to applicants around the world, Outreachy internships run twice a year.

    Once your application is approved, you must pick an open source project to make a contribution to, in hopes of being selected as an intern, and teamed with experienced mentors. You can read more about the program here.

    In my case, I was selected as an intern to work on the media subsystem of the Linux kernel, and my mentors were Helen Koike, (who is now my colleague at Collabora!) and Hans Verkuil (who works for Cisco and has been working on the media subsystem for around 15 years).

  • Eclipse Foundation Looks to Create Cloud-Based IDE Standards

    The Eclipse Foundation today announced the formation of a working group to create standards for cloud-based integrated development environments (IDEs) led by Broadcom, EclipseSource, Ericsson, IBM, Intel, Red Hat, SAP, Software AG and Typefox.

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More in Tux Machines

Dragora 3.0-beta1 released

I am pleased to announce the release of Dragora 3.0 Beta 1.

Dragora is a complete and reliable distribution of the GNU/Linux operating system that is entirely free software. Dragora is founded on the concepts of simplicity and elegance, it can be run for almost any purpose (desktop,
workstation, server, development, etc.). The intended audience is people
interested in learning more about the technical aspects of a friendly
GNU/Linux distribution.  Also people looking to use the purest ethical
software for daily use.

The beginning of the development of the series 3.0 represents the
migration towards a new C library, Musl.  The continuation of
supervision capabilities (introduced for the services in 2012).
The restructuring of the hierarchy of directories, the improvement of
the tools provided by the distribution, a new automatic method to build
the distribution, the prebuilt cross-compiler set, and much more!

The homepage is at www.dragora.org

Current development pages are located at
https://git.savannah.nongnu.org/cgit/dragora.git/ and
https://notabug.org/dragora/

Changes in this version:

  * A new installer for this series has been introduced, it can be
    invoked from the command line as `dragora-installer'.

  * A new tool (based on dialog(1)) has been introduced to
    configure the keyboard mapping in the console, it is called
    `dragora-keymap'.

  * Our simple and friendly package manager has reached version 1.3,
    which contains minor changes and fixes.  It is worth mentioning
    that Qi now uses `tarlz' to produce, list packages in parallel.
    Tarlz uses a simplified and safer variant of the POSIX pax format
    compressed with our favorite compressor "lzip".

  * To complement the security in general, for binaries with PIE and
SSP (both are default features in Dragora), they are now complemented
    with RELRO by default.

  * The main toolchain has been upgraded.  This -beta1 have Binutils
    2.33.1, The GNU C Compiler 9, GNU Linux libre 4.19.78, and
    Musl 1.1.24.

  * LibreSSL has been upgraded to the version 3.0.1

  * Ruby (programming language) version 2.6.5 has been introduced.

  * Support for FUSE (in the kernel) and user space, is now available
    in Dragora.

  * Xfce 4.14 has been introduced in this version.

  * dragora-ice, a customized version of IceWM has been added.

  * All the official X.Org components has been updated (drivers, server,
    applications, etc.).  Included new drivers: xf86-input-elographics,
    xf86-video-amdgpu, xf86-video-vboxvideo.  The configuration for the
    xf86-video-intel driver has been fixed this time.

  * Work to complete DocBook support in Dragora is underway.

  * Build recipes for new packages have been built:

    Please, traverse the /usr/pkg hierarchy for a full view of
    installed packages.

  * Many general fixes, improvements, and clean ups have been performed.

The ISO images may be fetched at:

    https://sourceforge.net/projects/dragora/files/beta/

See http://dragora.org/en/mirrors.html for a list of available mirrors.

The sha256sums are:

59a1c1693d62c2d61a0d5b4b826313ce8b736768b1a42097f1478a20a37f7a80 dragora-3.0-i586-beta1-live.iso 3127ea5b619b8e049b45a17e1e4d9c538b35ac067a7cd63d2262a30782e7cc2d dragora-3.0-i586-beta1-packages.iso 1c0f63a69cd4b674b742550562605f240e98cdbc63ab670c9f8cdd5d2d134efc dragora-3.0-x86_64-beta1-live.iso 2dd58b1e6429876aa1883b4682914184bce6cac2adfe53ea7c2e0c46d7987385 dragora-3.0-x86_64-beta1-packages.iso

Dragora is available in "live" or hybrid ISO image form. You need the .iso
for the packages if you want to perform a hard disk installation.

Notes:

* The password for the root user in the Live CD is: dragora

This beta version can be considered as stable, it is catalogued just as
beta because it lacks many things that we will try to complement in future
versions.

We welcome feedback at our Freenode IRC channel, #dragora, and on our
mailing list.  We are looking for help with documentation, testing,
bug reports, patches, etc.

Thank you to all of you who support this humble project made with great
sacrifice.  And thank you especially for supporting the philosophy and
spirit of software freedom that Dragora aims to promote.

Best regards,
Matias Fonzo, Dragora author and maintainer.

--
``Someone told me I would never be free
The way you are is way you'll always be
But it's all wrong!
There's Time To Burn'' - Ronnie James Dio

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PCLinuxOS 2019.10 updated installation media release

The PCLinuxOS project has announced the release of updated installation media for PCLinuxOS. The new media carries the version number 2019.10 and contains a fully updated system as of October 15 2019. Please note it is not required to do a clean installation each month since PCLinuxOS is a rolling release. These ISOs are being provided so new users don’t have a large update to perform after installation from a dated ISO. Read more

Firefox Reality Top Picks - Bringing You New Virtual Reality Experiences Weekly

So you bought yourself a fancy VR headset, you’ve played all the zombie-dragon-laser-kitten-battle games (we have too!) and now you’re wondering… what else is there? Where can I find other cool stuff to explore while I have this headset strapped to my face? We felt the same way, so we built Firefox Reality to help you in your quest for the most interesting, groundbreaking and entertaining virtual reality content on the Web. The real promise of VR is the ability to immerse yourself into countless other places and perspectives - both real and imaginary - and to experience things you’ve never done before. Our Top Picks page is a great place to start exploring, with fresh recommendations coming weekly so you always have new content to check out. Of course, if you want to explore on your own, you can use Firefox Reality for that too. Firefox Reality Top Picks is the start of what we hope will evolve into a thriving and sustainable ecosystem connecting creators, VR content, and audience. Read more Also: Faster Layouts with CSS Grid (and Subgrid!)

today's howtos