Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Development

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • The Rust Programming Language Blog: Core team membership updates

    The Rust Core team is excited to announce the first of a series of changes to its structure we’ve been planning for 2021, starting today by adding several new members.

    Originally, the Core team was composed of the leads from each Rust team. However, as Rust has grown, this has long stopped being true; most members of the Core team are not team leads in the project. In part, this is because Core’s duties have evolved significantly away from the original technical focus. Today, we see the Core team’s purpose as enabling, amplifying, and supporting the excellent work of every Rust team. Notably, this included setting up and launching the Rust Foundation.

  • How to Insert in the Front Index List in Python

    In this tutorial, we are going to see how we can insert an element at the front of the list in Python. In addition, we will only use the integer concepts to be easy to understand, and other data types will be similar, as shown in this article.

  • Rakudo Weekly News: 2021.39 Programming Haku

    Wim Vanderbauwhede introduces Haku, a Japanese programming language. It shows a very interesting example of how you can use grammars of the Raku Programming Language to create your own programming language (see introduction). This caused quite a discussion on Hacker News and some on /r/rakulang.

Developers: Let distros do their job

Filed under
Development
GNU
Linux

I wrote a post some time ago titled Developers shouldn’t distribute their own software, and after a discussion on the sr.ht IRC channel today, the topic seems worthy of renewed mention. Let’s start with this: what exactly is a software distribution, anyway?

I use “software distribution” here, rather than “Linux distribution”, because it generalizes better. For example, all of the major BSD systems, plus Illumos and others besides, are software distributions, but don’t involve Linux. Some differ further still, sitting on top of another operating system, such as Nix or pkgsrc. What these systems all have in common is that they concern themselves with the distribution of software, and thus are a software distribution.

An important trait of these systems is that they function independently of the development of the software they distribute, and are overseen by a third party. For the purpose of this discussion, I will rule out package repositories which are not curated by the third-party in question, such as npm or PyPI. It is no coincidence that such repositories often end up distributing malware.

Software distributions are often volunteer-run and represent the interests of the users; in a sense they are a kind of union of users. They handle building your software for their system, and come to the table with domain-specific knowledge about the concerns of the platform that they’re working with. There are hundreds of Linux distros and each does things differently — the package maintainers are the experts who save you the burden of learning how all of them work. Instead of cramming all of your files into /opt, they will carefully sort it into the right place, make sure all of your dependencies are sorted upon installation, and make the installation of your software a single command (or click) away.

Read more

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • Ravgeet Dhillon: Build a Tip Calculator App in Flutter

    In this tutorial, you’ll create a Tip Calculator app and learn some of the basics of developing a Flutter app. The app will let the user input - Bill Amount and Tip Percentage. Based on these values, it will calculate Tip Amount and Total Amount.

  • Book Review: Cross-Platform Development with Qt 6 and Modern C++

    I recently received a review copy of the Cross-Platform Development with Qt 6 and Modern C++ by Nibedit Dey available from Packt. I find it interesting to read books on Qt in the midst of a major version shift, as many of the underpinnings of Qt are revisited and updated by the development teams.

    In his book, Nibedit balances between the newer technologies used, e.g. CMake, function reference based signals and slots, etc while referring back to Qt 5 (and even Qt 4) practices such as QMake, the SIGNAL and SLOT macros, and more. This gives a good context to the reader, which is good for the reader, as older practices still are used in older Qt-based codebases.

    The book is divided into blocks with increasing depth and complexity. This makes it a good read for the beginner, as well as the more experienced used of Qt. Either you start from the beginning and get introduced to both widgets and QML, or you can dive straight into the more advanced topics such as the model-view concepts.

  • SReview::Video is now Media::Convert

    SReview, the video review and transcode tool that I originally wrote for FOSDEM 2017 but which has since been used for debconfs and minidebconfs as well, has long had a sizeable component for inspecting media files with ffprobe, and generating ffmpeg command lines to convert media files from one format to another.

    This component, SReview::Video (plus a number of supporting modules), is really not tied very much to the SReview webinterface or the transcoding backend. That is, the webinterface and the transcoding backend obviously use the ffmpeg handling library, but they don't provide any services that SReview::Video could not live without. It did use the configuration API that I wrote for SReview, but disentangling that turned out to be very easy.

What’s up with Sandboxing?

Filed under
OS
Development
Gadgets

In February 2021 we released Sailfish OS 4.0.1 Koli, which introduced a new concept into the OS: Application sandboxing. For the device user, the sandboxing is mostly visible in the permissions dialogs, displayed when a sandboxed app is run for the first time. In this blog post, I’ll dig into the current status, our plans for the future, and what this all means for application developers.

In case you haven’t heard about sandboxing in the context of Sailfish OS before, here’s a short primer: the purpose of sandboxing is to improve user privacy, by limiting what applications can do. This is done using a security technology in the Linux kernel called namespaces. This is a lightweight but effective mechanism, which lets us define quite nicely which resources each app can use. All in all, the end result is that the device user is in charge of what resources each app can access.

Read more

Open Hardware/Modding Projects

Filed under
Development
Hardware
  • ANAVI Gardening uHAT adds soil and other sensors to Raspberry Pi (Crowdfunding) - CNX Software

    We’ve been covering and reviewing ANAVI open-source hardware boards for several years now, either standalone boards based on ESP8266, or add-on boards for Raspberry Pi.

    The ANAVI Gardening uHAT is the latest board from Leon Anavi. It is a micro HAT designed for Raspberry Pi Zero to Raspberry Pi 4 SBCs that offers interfaces for soil sensors and other environmental sensors allowing measurements of soil moisture, atmospheric pressure and humidity, temperature with a waterproof sensor, and light intensity for gardening applications.

  • ZB-GW03 ESP32-based Ethernet Zigbee gateway works with Tasmota firmware - CNX Software

    ZB-GW03 is an Ethernet Zigbee Gateway compatible with eWelink mobile app and with a design similar to SONOFF ZBBridge gateway but replacing ESP8266 SoC by ESP32 SoC, and adding an Ethernet port.

    The ZB-GW03 gateway is apparently based on the same Silicon Labs EFR32MG21 Zigbee Arm Cortex-M33 chip and has been hacked to run Tasmota open-source software for people preferring more flexibility and/or integration with OpenHAB or Home Assistant open-source home automation frameworks via Zigbee2MQTT.

  • Arduino Orchestra Plays The Planets Suite | Hackaday

    We’ve seen a great many Arduino synthesizer projects over the years. We love to see a single Arduino bleeping out some monophonic notes. From there, many hackers catch the bug and the sky is truly the limit. [Kevin] is one such hacker who now has an Arduino orchestra capable of playing all seven movements of Gustav Holst’s Planets Suite.

    The performers are not human beings with expensive instruments, but simple microcontrollers running code hewn by [Kevin’s] own fingertips. The full orchestra consists of 11 Arduino Nanos, 6 Arduino Unos, 1 Arduino Pro Mini, 1 Adafruit Feather 32u4, and finally, a Raspberry Pi.

  • 3D Printed Research Robotics Platform Runs Remotely | Hackaday

    By patching Ubuntu Linux, and enabling preemptive multitasking for real-time scheduling, as well as carefully selecting Wi-Fi drivers, it was possible to get raw packets out to robot in about 1 ms, enabling control loop bandwidths of around 1 Khz. And, that, was fast enough to run at least sixteen motors in parallel.

  • Automated Window Blinds Using MQTT And Home Assistant | Hackaday

    Finnish software engineer [Toni] is on a quest to modernize his 1991 house, and his latest project was to automate the window blinds and control them using Home Assistant. Unless your blinds have built-in motors, most of the effort of such a project centers around how to integrate and attach the motor — and as [Toni] points out, there are tons of different blinds with all kinds of operating mechanisms. But once you solve that issue, half the battle is over.

    These particular blinds require less than one turn of the control rod to go from fully open to fully closed, and [Toni] selects a 270-degree range-of-motion, 20 kg*cm torque servo motor to drive them. He really wanted to install the motor inside the window, but it just wouldn’t fit. Instead, each servo motor is mounted in a custom 3D-printed case installed on the window frame just below the operating rod. An ESP8266-based controller box is installed above the window, hidden behind curtains, and operates all three servos.

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • QuickLicenseRT Linux 3.0 - Protect and License Desktop Software

    QuickLicenseRT Linux 3.0 implements the QuickLicense 9.1 runtime system to protect and license a Linux desktop applications. Apply licensing to a 32 or 64-bit executable with a few programming commands. Use LinuxWrap to license a compiled executable without programming.

  • Turing Award winner Barbara Liskov on CLU and why programming is still cool • The Register

    It has been 12 years since Barbara Liskov won a Turing Award for her contributions to practical and theoretical foundations of programming language and system design, and these days the creator of the CLU programming language continues to work on some interesting problems.

    We spoke about innovation, abstraction and encapsulation in the 1970s and today in a recent chat.

    Liskov, now in her 80s, leads the Programming Methodology Group at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Recently, she has been working on parallel computing and, with a student, developed Byzantine Fault Tolerance* [PDF] in the 1990s, "which turns out to be very significant for the blockchain world," she says.

  • GitLab all set to go public as revenues – and losses – rise

    DevOps darling GitLab has finally filed for an Initial Public Offering (IPO) as revenues continue to grow and losses widen.

    The IPO had been expected in 2020 but the company put things off due to the pandemic until late last week, when the paperwork was filed with the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).

    The company, founded in 2014, has remained tight-lipped over the sums involved, although the filed S-1 form recorded that the proposed maximum aggregate offering price is estimated at $100m.

    [...]

    In the IPO document, Gitlabs said it was on course to grow revenues to $233m in its current financial year ending in 2022. This compares to the $152.2m reported in fiscal 2021 and the $81.2m in the year before that.

    However, losses also widened over those years. The net loss in fiscal 2020 was $130.7m – but it was $192.2m in fiscal 2021. Net loss reached $69m for the six months ended 31 July 2021, up from $43.5m for the same time last year.

  • The 10 Core Differences Between C and C++

    C and C++ are two different well-recognized programming languages with the function of assembly language. Though both C and C ++ sound similar with an extra "++" on the latter, their features and usage are distinctive.

    C is a procedural programming language with a static system, whereas C++ is an enhanced version of the C programming language with object-oriented programming support.

8 Reasons Why You Should Use Linux for Programming

Filed under
Development
GNU
Linux

Linux is a platform with a good market reputation. Programmers prefer to use it for multiple reasons. It is easier to set up and run over any system. Moreover, its interface comes up with continuous improvements that make it desirable even for programming assignment help .

[....]

No doubt system maintenance is an important thing that requires consideration while setting up and operating the operating system. Linux is simple in maintenance due to its easy to understand interface. The operating system and other software are easier to update. Further, it is a protective system from malware and viruses that helps to arrange data accurately or safely.

The feature of getting all updates on a regular basis helps a lot in making the system quick over actions. As compared to Linux system maintenance on any other setup is not that easy. Further, it requires third party assistance to update the system and much more. But in the case of Linux it is quick and smart in updating or maintenance without the requirement of any third party system.

Read more

Why do programmers prefer to use Linux?

Filed under
Development
GNU
Linux

Windows is the most widely used operating system, both in home and business environments. Most of the programs are created to run on this operating system. However, the people who create these programs (developers, programmers and system administrators mainly) prefer to leave Windows aside and work on another operating system: Linux. Why? What brings you to this?

Linux offers a large number of advantages when it comes to working and developing, advantages that range from flexibility to security and system performance. Today, Linux is a perfectly affordable system for any user, since it is not much more complicated to use than any Windows system. However, this OS does not end up gaining popularity within home environments, its main strength being the servers and the computers of the programmers.

Read more

Programming/Development Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • New tool: an nginx playground

    On Wednesday I was talking to a friend about how it would be cool to have an nginx playground website where you can just paste in an nginx config and test it out. And then I realized it might actually be pretty easy to build, so got excited and started coding and I built it.

  • Pandas to check cell value is NaN

    The main documentation of the pandas is saying null values are missing values. We can denote the missing or null values as NaN in the pandas as most developers do. The NaN and None keywords are both used by developers to show the missing values in the dataframe. The best thing in the pandas is that it treats both NaN and None similarly. To check the missing value of a cell, pandas.notnull will return False in both cases of NaN and None if the cell has NaN or None.

    So, in this article, we will explore different methods to check whether a particular cell value is null or not (NaN or None).

  • gfldex: Convolution

    Flavio wrote a straightforward solution to PWC-131-1 and wondered if there is a idiomatic way. Assuming, that “idiomatic” means to use language features which lesser languages refuse to require, I’m happy to deliver convoluted code.

  • Perl Weekly Challenge 131: Consecutive Arrays

    These are some answers to task 1 of the Week 131 of the Perl Weekly Challenge organized by Mohammad S. Anwar.

    Spoiler Alert: This weekly challenge deadline is due in a few days from now (on September 26, 2021 at 24:00). This blog post offers some solutions to this challenge, please don’t read on if you intend to complete the challenge on your own.

  • My Favorite Modules: if | Tom Wyant [blogs.perl.org]

    My blog post My Favorite Warnings: redundant and missing touched on the use of the if module. Comments on that post made me think it deserved a top-level treatment, expanding on (though not necessarily improving on) Aristotle's comment.

Open Hardware With Focus on Arduino

Filed under
Development
Hardware
  • Arduino Nicla Sense ME makes sense of the world | Arduino Blog

    Nicla is Arduino Pro’s new family of modular, intelligent products that are easy to use, versatile and accessible – whether you are an advanced user working on industrial applications or a budding maker looking to prototype your first intelligent solution. No wonder it’s named after the Greek word for “victory of the people!”

    To herald the range, we have just released the Nicla Sense ME: a tiny but mighty board, co-developed with Bosch Sensortec to enable sensing and intelligence on the edge. With low-power sensors, a high-performance processor and small footprint, it offers a winning combination that can answer our community’s and clients’ needs and open up to opportunities for infinite new solutions.

  • Captivating Clock Puts Endangered Displays On Display | Hackaday

    When you have a small stock of vacuum fluorescent displays (VFDs) straight out of the 1976 Radio Shack catalog, you might sit around wondering what to do with them. When [stepawayfromthegirls] found out that his stash of seven DT-1704A tubes may be the last in existence, there was no question. They must be displayed! [stepawayfromthegirls]’ mode of display is this captivating clock build. Four VFDs with their aqua colored elements are set against a black background in a bespoke wooden case. Looking under the hood, the beauty only increases.

  • The first Arduino Education Inspiration Lab

    Arduino Education is delighted to announce its very first Inspiration Lab, in partnership with Technobel in Belgium.

  • Open Source Autopilot For Cheap Trolling Motors

    Quiet electric trolling motors are great for gliding into your favorite fishing spot but require constant correction if wind and water currents are at play. As an alternative to expensive commercial GPS-guided trolling motors, [AlexAsplund] created Vanchor, an open source system for adding autopilot to a cheap trolling motor.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Debian Etch: Solid, Crufty, Some Assembly Required srlinuxx
Story This months Cosmo srlinuxx 06/02/2005 - 4:03am
Story 50 gmail invites? srlinuxx 1 06/02/2005 - 4:10am
Story Moooore Spam! srlinuxx 1 06/02/2005 - 4:12am
Story Vin Diesel going soft on us? srlinuxx 2 06/02/2005 - 4:25pm
Poll How's the new site? srlinuxx 2 06/02/2005 - 9:01pm
Story Hackers homing in on Cellular Phones srlinuxx 5 07/02/2005 - 2:20pm
Story M$ Claims Safer than Linux srlinuxx 1 11/02/2005 - 5:34am
Story This Week At the Movies: Boogeyman & Alone in the Dark & Hide and Seek srlinuxx 1 11/02/2005 - 5:41am
Story Forbes Wants to Know srlinuxx 2 11/02/2005 - 6:13am