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Development

New Human Interface Guidelines for GNOME and GTK+

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Development
GNOME

I’ve recently been hard at work on a new and updated version of the GNOME Human Interface Guidelines, and am pleased to announce that this will be ready for the upcoming 3.14 release.

Over recent years, application design has evolved a huge amount. The web and native applications have become increasingly similar, and new design patterns have become the norm. During that period, those of us in the GNOME Design Team have worked with developers to expand the range of GTK+’s capabilities, and the result is a much more modern toolkit.

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Eclipse Luna for Fedora 20

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Development
Red Hat
Software

If you are a Fedora Eclipse user, then you're probably saddened since the release of Eclipse Luna (4.4) because you are still using Eclipse Kepler (4.3) on Fedora 20.

Well, be saddened no longer because Eclipse Luna is now available for Fedora 20 as a software collection!

A software collection is simply a set of RPMs whose contents are isolated from the rest of your system such that they do not modify, overwrite or otherwise conflict with anything in the main Fedora repositories. This allows you install multiple versions of a software stack side-by-side, without them interfering with one another. More can be read about this mechanism on the software collections website.

The Eclipse Luna software collection lives in a separate yum repository, which must be configured by clicking on this link to install the release package.

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Patch By Patch, LLVM Clang Gets Better At Building The Linux Kernel

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Development
Linux
BSD

With each kernel revision, LLVM Clang gets closer to being able to build the mainline Linux kernel. There's now just a few dozen patches outstanding for LLVMLinux to be a mainline success.

Behan Webster gave his usual talk at LinuxCon in Chicago this week about the state of LLVMLinux -- building the Linux kernel with Clang rather than GCC. There's been many Phoronix articles about the topic so there isn't too much more to share beyond that many developers want to use Clang to compile the Linux kernel to lead to better code portability of the kernel, faster compilation times of Clang, potential performance differences, LLVM and Clang are more liberally licensed, and there's a host of other development extras with Clang.

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Emulator brings x86 Linux apps to ARM devices

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Development

Eltechs announced a virtual machine that runs 32-bit x86 Linux applications on ARMv7 SBCs and mini-PCs, and is claimed to be 4.5 times faster than QEMU.

The open source QEMU emulator has long been the go-to app for providing virtual machines (VMs) that mimic target hardware during development or otherwise run software in alien territory. Every now and then, someone comes up with software that claims to perform all or part of QEMU’s feature-set more effectively. In this case, Eltechs has launched its Eltechs “ExaGear Desktop,” a VM that implements a virtual x86 Linux container on ARMv7 computers and is claimed to be 4.5 times faster than QEMU. Despite its “desktop” naming, we can imagine many non-desktop possibilities fpr ExaGear in embedded.

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Qt Creator 3.2 Officially Released

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Development
KDE

Qt Creator 3.2, a cross-platform IDE (integrated development environment) tailored to the needs of Qt developers and part of the Qt Project, is now available for download.

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Wine Announcement

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Development
Software

The Wine development release 1.7.25 is now available.

What's new in this release (see below for details):
- Implementation of the packet capture library.
- A few more DirectWrite functions.
- Improvements in HTML table support.
- More VBScript math functions.
- Various bug fixes.

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We have C++14!

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Development

Following the Issaquah meeting in February, we launched the Draft International Standard (DIS) ballot for the next C++ standard. That ballot closed on Friday.

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Kids Are Learning to Code With a Slice of Raspberry Pi

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Development
Linux

Raspberry Pi is a credit card-size computer that can function like a basic PC when plugged into a monitor and keyboard. It can record videos and power drones, but developer Eben Upton says his goal was to teach basic programming skills to students as young as 8.

The small computer, sold by the nonprofit Raspberry Pi Foundation, is a small green board covered in metal ports. It’s light, delicate, and fits in the palm of your hand. Once it’s plugged into a keyboard and monitor, a user can write and tweak code as with any PC. The latest model, B+, has 10 operating systems to choose from, with varying learning curves.

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Raspberry Pi was created to solve talent crisis at Cambridge: Eben Upton [Interview]

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Development
Hardware
Interviews

Raspberry Pi needs no introduction. It is one of the most popular credit card sized single board computers which has become a revolution in its own right. The $25 (and $35 for B model) hardware is being used in so many fields that it’s hard to keep a tab on it.

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Linux kernel devs made to finger their dongles before contributing code

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Development
Linux
Security

Beginning on Monday, the security of the Linux kernel source code has become a little bit tighter with the addition of two-factor authentication for the kernel's Git code repositories.

Contributing code changes to the Linux kernel sources at Kernel.org already required more than just a password, even before the change. Developers must use their own unique SSH public keys to login to the Git repositories. But not even this added security layer was truly failsafe – as the software's maintainers found out in 2011 when their servers were rooted.

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New Google Nexus Leak Confirms 192-Core, 64-bit Apple Rival

Last September Apple AAPL +0.16% caused a stir when it announced iOS 7 and the accompanying iPhone 5S would support 64-bit operation. The move to this much faster architecture gave it the jump on 32-bit rivals Android and Windows Phone and brought Apple’s products in-line with desktop and laptop-class computing. But now Android has caught up and may well go speeding past. No less than three devices lead the charge: a teaser, a leak and an official announcement. Interestingly all come from HTC and the one which will attain by far the most headlines is the new Google ‘Nexus 9’ tablet – also dubbed the ‘Nexus X’ – which will do battle head-on with the iPad mini . Read more

20-Way Radeon Comparison With Open-Source Graphics For Steam On Linux Gaming

When it comes to Linux gamers wanting a discrete graphics card backed by open-source drivers, the only solution right now to truly recommend for those serious about performance and making use of the hardware is really AMD Radeon graphics. While Nouveau has been making much progress, until re-clocking and other issues are worked out the performance can be unbearably slow depending upon the particular graphics processor or run into other problems. (Of course, when talking about proprietary graphics drivers on Linux, the story is entirely different, or if considering integrated Intel HD Graphics.) For those pursuing a AMD Radeon GPU for their own Steam Box/Machine build and hope to use the open-source Gallium3D drivers, here's some Steam on Linux gaming benchmarks from almost two dozen different GPUs. Read more

Ubuntu 14.10 Beta 1 (Utopic Unicorn) to Arrive in a Couple of Days

"So Beta 1 is this week and I'll be taking care of the builds and paperwork. Could participating flavours please get in touch here or on IRC? In the mean time, I'm going to assume a participation similar to Alpha-2 and configure cron, propose-migration and the tracker accordingly, then build a first candidate for each of your flavours," wrote Canonical's Stéphane Graber. Read more

Optimize your Linux rig for top-notch writing

I'm a big fan of Scott Nesbitt's writing, which has a technological bent, but is usually more about working effectively, rather than how tools can make you effective, which is a key distinction. Scott's setup reflects his focus on production rather than tweaking. He has his work tools and everything else is pretty much white noise—which is why LXDE/Lubuntu probably makes a lot of sense for his workflow. It's simple and it stays out of his way. Scott also gets bonus points for moving his family to Linux. That's a tough move, but given that his wife stole his ZaReason laptop, the conversion seems to have taken. Read more