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Development

A Time Namespace Has Been Proposed For The Linux Kernel

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Development
Linux

A set of experimental patches were sent out on Wednesday for implementing a time namespace within the kernel, part of an effort that's been going on for more than a decade around time virtualization.

These 20 patches under a "request for comments" flag allow for per-namespace offsets to the system clocks, including for monotonic and boot-time clocks.

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Reply to Rick Moen on DNG

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Development
Linux
OSS

Ah, deliciously vague language. Useful to, in time, get uncooperative maintainers thrown off the project to be replaced by more cooperative, on-message maintainers. Remember that technical merit or quality is not the goal of the author of the Contributor Covenant on which this CoC is directly based.

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Databases and Python Programming

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Development
  • NoSQL Books

    One of the most basic choices to make when developing an application is whether to use a SQL or NoSQL database to store the data. “NoSQL” simply means non-relational and not SQL. It’s sometimes referred to as unstructured storage.

    Like any type of database, NoSQL systems are used for storing and retrieving data. But NoSQL systems store and manage data in ways that allow for high operational speed and great flexibility which is extremely useful for big data databases and cloud databases.

  • Canonical Announces Extended Security Maintenance for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, Mozilla to Discuss the Future of Advertising at ICDPPC, Newegg Attacked, MetaCase Launches MetaEdit+ 5.5 and MariaDB Acquires Clustrix

    MariaDB has acquired Clustrix, the "pioneer in distributed database technology". According to the press release, this acquisition gives "MariaDB's open source database the scalability and high-availability that rivals or exceeds Oracle and Amazon while foregoing the need for expensive computing platforms or high licensing fees."

  • Python 3.7 beginner's cheat sheet

    The Python programming language is known for its large community and diverse extension menu, but much is packed into the language itself. This cheat sheet rounds up a few built-in pieces to get new Python programmers started.

  • 8 Python packages that will simplify your life with Django

    Django developers, we're devoting this month's Python column to packages that will help you. These are our favorite Django libraries for saving time, cutting down on boilerplate code, and generally simplifying our lives. We've got six packages for Django apps and two for Django's REST Framework, and we're not kidding when we say these packages show up in almost every project we work on.

    But first, see our tips for making the Django Admin more secure and an article on 5 favorite open source Django packages.

The best editor for PHP developers who work in Linux OS

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Development
Software

Every programmer knows that coding is fun! Don't you agree with me? However, to be an absolutely professional PHP developer, we have to know a lot about all the specific details of coding.

Selecting the editor you are going to use to happily code is not an easy decision and must be taken unhurriedly.

If you are a beginner, you may try a great code editor with a rich functionality and very flexible customization which is known as Atom Editor, the editor of the XXI century. You may say that we have many pretty alternatives available. Read the explanation below, and the introduced information will knock you off!

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Moving Compiler Dependency Checks to Kconfig

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Development
Linux

One reason became clear recently when Linus Torvalds asked developers to add an entirely new system of dependency checks to the Kconfig language, specifically testing the capabilities of the GCC compiler.

It's actually an important issue. The Linux kernel wants to support as many versions of GCC as possible—so long as doing so would not require too much insanity in the kernel code itself—but different versions of GCC support different features. The GCC developers always are tweaking and adjusting, and GCC releases also sometimes have bugs that need to be worked around. Some Linux kernel features can only be built using one version of the compiler or another. And, some features build better or faster if they can take advantage of various GCC features that exist only in certain versions.

Up until this year, the kernel build system has had to check all those compiler features by hand, using many hacky methods. The art of probing a tool to find out if it supports a given feature dates back decades and is filled with insanity. Imagine giving a command that you know will fail, but giving it anyway because the specific manner of failure will tell you what you need to know for a future command to work. Now imagine hundreds of hacks like that in the Linux kernel build system.

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New CloudBees Suite Addresses DevOps Gaps in Software Delivery

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Development
OSS

CloudBees is bringing a set of products into a new CloudBees Suite that it said will help companies of all sizes streamline the software development process. The new software is set to be announced Sept. 18 at the company’s DevOps World / Jenkins World conference in San Francisco. Jenkins is the open-source version of CloudBees, which is a commercial offering.

A central piece of the CloudBees Suite is the CloudBees Core for unified governance of continuous delivery operations and processes used in DevOps. Software pipelines can also use Core to run software pipelines more efficiently in a self-managed way in the cloud or on-premises.

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Also: CloudBees Announces Availability of Support for Jenkins Open Source

Variety Wallpaper Changer And Downloader 0.7.0 Ported To Python 3, Adds Support For Settings GDM Background

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Development
Software

A new major version of Variety Wallpaper Changer is out. With the latest 0.7.0 release, Variety was ported to Python 3, while also receiving some improvements like support for setting the Gnome Screensaver / GDM background to match the desktop wallpaper.

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Qt 5.12 Alpha Released

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Development
KDE

I am pleased to announce that Qt 5.12 Alpha is released today. There are prebuild binaries as well in addition to source code packages with Alpha release.

Please check Qt 5.12 New Features wiki to see what new is coming with Qt 5.12 release. Please note that the feature list is still in progress and not to be considered final before the first Beta release.

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Also: Qt 5.12 Alpha Released With OpenGL ES 3.1 Renderer, Several Wayland Improvements

Programming: Ballerina Programming Language, D Language Front-End Is Trying Now To Get Into GCC 9

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Development
  • TNS Context: The CNCF Open Source Survey and the Ballerina Programming Language

    Today on The New Stack Context podcast, we talk with Chris Aniszczyk, co-founder of the TODO Group and Chief Technology Officer of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) about the results of our recent open source program management survey. We also talk about WS02‘s new cloud native programming language, Ballerina.

    Joining Context host TNS editorial director Libby Clark for this episode is TNS founder Alex Williams and TNS managing editor Joab Jackson.

  • The D Language Front-End Is Trying Now To Get Into GCC 9

    Going on for a while now have been D language front-end patches for GCC to allow this programming language to be supported by the GNU Compiler Collection. It's been a long battle getting to this state but it looks like it soon might be mainlined.

    Last June was the approval by the GCC Steering Committee to allow D support in GCC. While the committee approved of its addition, the D language front-end didn't end up getting merged in time for the GCC 8 stable release that took place earlier this year.

LLVM 7.0.0 is Ready

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Development
BSD
  • [llvm-dev] [7.0.0 Release] The final tag is in

    The final version of 7.0.0 has been tagged from the branch at r342370. It is identical to rc3 modulo release notes and docs changes.

  • LLVM 7.0 Is Ready For Release

    The LLVM/Clang 7.0 release had been running a bit behind schedule and warranted a third release candidate, but this week LLVM 7.0.0 is now ready to ship.

    Release manager Hans Wennborg announced minutes ago on the mailing list that the 7.0.0 release has been tagged in their source tree. This ends up being the same as last week's 7.0-RC3 except for release notes and documentation updates.

  • LLVM Developers Still Discussing SPIR-V Support Within Clang

    One of the features that didn't materialize for LLVM / Clang 7.0 is the SPIR-V support within the compiler toolchain.

    While there has been a SPIR-V / LLVM translator out-of-tree and various developers at different vendors have been discussing for months the prospects of adding SPIR-V intermediate representation support to LLVM/Clang, it has yet to materialize.

    The latest developer discussion is to have a roundtable talk on the SPIR-V integration at the 2018 LLVM Developers' Meeting. This year the LLVM Developers' Meeting is happening at the San Jose Convention Center from 17 to 18 October.

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More in Tux Machines

EEE, Entryism and Openwashing

  • New Linux distro specifically designed for Windows comes to the Microsoft Store [Ed: WLinux or Whitewater Foundry not the first time people exploit Microsoft to put a price tag on FOSS such as LibreOffice. Microsoft is doing a fine job sabotaging the GNU/Linux 'ecosystem'.]
    WLinux is based on Debian, and the developer, Whitewater Foundry, claims their custom distro will also allow faster patching of security and compatibility issues that appear from time to time between upstream distros and WSL. [...] In return for saving developers time Whitewater Foundry is charging $19.99 (though the app is currently 50% off and the distribution can be downloaded from Github for free).
  • Open source dev gets Win32 apps running on Xbox One [Ed: Running blobs on two DRM platforms does not make you "Open source dev"]
  • Building Blocks of Secure Development: How to Make Open Source Work for You [Ed: Veracode self-promotion in "webinar" form, badmouthing FOSS to push their proprietary things. They work with Microsoft.]
  • SD Times open source project of the week: TonY [Ed: Openwashing of a surveillance operation at Microsoft]
    Unsatisfied with the available solutions for connecting the analytics-generating power of their TensorFlow machine learning implementations with the scalable data computation and storage capabilities of their Apache Hadoop clusters, developers at LinkedIn decided that they’d take matters into their own hands with the development of this week’s highlighted project, TonY.
  • Open Source: Automating Release Notes in Github [Ed: The New York Times is still propping up Microsoft hosting]
  • Opendesk launches augmented-reality shopping for its open-source furniture [Ed: Calling furniture "open"]
    Opendesk customers can now use augmented reality to see how the furniture brand's pieces look in their homes before ordering them from local makers. The augmented-reality (AR) experience launched with the arrival of Apple's iOS 12 operating system this week. It enables customers to use their smartphones to view some of Opendesk's furniture superimposed on the room in front of them.
  • Open Source Testing Startup Cypress Leaves Beta With Thousands of Users, Launches Paid Plans [Ed: This is not Open Source; they misuse the label and even put dashes ("open-source") because they know they're faking it.]
    Cypress.io‘s CEO Drew Lanham explains that the startup’s tool is software created by developers, for developers. The company was founded in 2014 by technologist Brian Mann, after observing that while computing and application development had changed drastically over the past decade, software testing had not. Large companies now release thousands of software updates a year, often on a daily basis across their organization. Technology teams aim to move rapidly, iterating on an agile basis and working in parallel so they can sync their code together even faster. But, as Lanham explains, the testing software out there was far outdated for these agile processes.
  • Kindred Introduces SenseAct, the First Reinforcement Learning Open-Source Toolkit for Physical Robots [Ed: Kindred or SenseAct not actually FOSS; but they sure try to make it seem that way, by focusing on a toolkit.]

Top Linux Distros for Software Developers

A major factor in the choice of Linux distro is your personal preference. You may try one of the most popular Linux distros but find that you prefer one that’s less often used. Your experience with Linux will also factor into which distro is suited to you. With the benefits Linux can offer — including flexibility, stability, and support — it’s worth evaluating your options. Read more

Source Code From Deutsche Telekom

  • Edge compute platform is open source
    Deutsche Telekom and Aricent have partnered for the creation of an Open Source, low latency Edge compute platform available to operators, to enable them to develop and launch 5G mobile applications and services faster.
  • Deutsche Telekom and Aricent Create Open Source Edge Software Framework
    Deutsche Telekom and Aricent today announced the creation of an Open Source, Low Latency Edge Compute Platform available to operators, to enable them to develop and launch 5G mobile applications and services faster. The cost-effective Edge platform is built for software-defined data centers (SDDC) and is decentralized, to accelerate the deployment of ultra-low latency applications. The joint solution will include a software framework with key capabilities for developers, delivered as a platform-as-a-service (PaaS) and will incorporate cloud-native Multi-access edge computing (MEC) technologies.
  • DT and Aricent announce telco Open Source Edge framework for 5G
    Deutsche Telekom and Aricent have announced the creation of an Open Source Edge software framework, designed especially for developers, platform-as-a-service and cloud-native multi-access edge computing technologies and on-track to intersect with the deployment of 5G enabled network edge facilities to tackle ultra-low latency network applications. The Edge platform has been built for software-defined data centers (SDDC) and will include a software framework with key capabilities for developers, delivered as a platform-as-a-service (PaaS) and will incorporate cloud-native Multi-access edge computing (MEC) technologies.
  • Deutsche Telekom, Aricent brew up edge compute platform for 5G apps and services
    In order to speed up the rollout of 5G applications and services, Duetsche Telekom and Aricent have teamed up to build an edge compute platform. The open source, edge software framework was built for use in software-defined data centers in decentralized locations. It also uses cloud-native multiaccess edge computing (MEC) technologies.
  • Deutsche Telekom, Aricent Bridge Cloud Native, Telco MEC Gap
    German telecom giant Deutsche Telekom and Aricent threw their collective weight behind an open source edge computing platform targeted at software-defined data centers (SDDC). The initiative gamely joins a growing list of open source multi-access edge computing (MEC) initiatives. The DT-Aricent collaboration is at its core a decentralized platform designed to help telecom operators develop and launch low-latency 5G mobile applications and services. It includes a software framework with features delivered through a platform-as-a-service (PaaS) model.

Android Leftovers