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Development

Development News

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Development
  • New SourceForge Owners Start Trust Repair

    SourceForge Media announced the termination notice with a promise of other policy changes coming soon.

    DevShare was an opt-in revenue-sharing program for developers that was started in 2013. The program attempted to give open source software developers a monetizing stream by bundling selected software titles with the free downloads. It garnered negative reactions because projects hosted on SourceForge could bundle adware with project installers.

  • SourceForge Attempts to Rebuild its Integrity

    There was a time when SourceForge was the defacto default standard open-source code repository. That time is not now - as Github and mis-steps at SourceForge have eroded both the mind and market share that SourceForge once had.

  • IBM Bequeaths the Express Framework to the Node.js Foundation

    The Node.js Foundation has taken the Express Node.js framework under its wing.

    Express will be a new incubation project for the Foundation. IBM, which purchased Express maintainer StrongLoop last September, is contributing the code.

  • Data analysis of GitHub contributions reveals unexpected gender bias

    With more than 12 million users, GitHub is one of the largest online communities for collaborating on development projects. Now a team of researchers has done an exhaustive analysis of millions of GitHub pull requests for open source projects, trying to discover whether the contributions of women were accepted less often than the contributions of men. What they discovered was that women's contributions were actually accepted more often than men's—but only if the women had gender-neutral profiles. Women whose GitHub profiles revealed their genders had a much harder time.

GitHub's Atom and GitHub Enterprise 2.5

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Development
  • GitHub's Atom 1.5 Hackable Text Editor Out Now, Atom 1.6 Enters Beta Testing

    On February 9, 2016, GitHub's devs made some big announcements for its awesome and acclaimed Atom open-source hackable text editor, which reached stable version 1.5 for all supported operating systems.

  • Big? GitHub Enterprise 2.5 thinks massive

    Keeping up its push to be an enterprise presence, GitHub has announced the latest version of the for-pay, enterprise edition of its code-hosting platform.

    The company says GitHub Enterprise 2.5's focus is "companies operating at massive scale" -- enterprises with more than 10,000 developers and exponential year-over-year growth. The new toolset for GitHub Enterprise 2.5 helps large teams add new users, collaborate safely on large projects, and deal with GitHub-related performance issues that can crop up around such large projects.

SourceForge Loses DevShare

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Development
OSS
  • SourceForge Loses DevShare
  • SourceForge Acquisition and Future Plans

    Our first order of business was to terminate the “DevShare” program. As of last week, the DevShare program was completely eliminated. The DevShare program delivered installer bundles as part of the download for participating projects. We want to restore our reputation as a trusted home for open source software, and this was a clear first step towards that. We’re more interested in doing the right thing than making extra short-term profit. As we move forward, we will be focusing on the needs of our developers and visitors by building out site features and establishing community trust. Eliminating the DevShare program was just the first step of many more to come. Plans for the near future include full https support for both SourceForge and Slashdot, and a lot more changes we think developers and end-users will embrace.

Development News

Filed under
Development
  • GHC performance is rather stable

    Johannes Bechberger, while working on his Bachelor’s thesis supervised by my colleague Andreas Zwinkau, has developed a performance benchmark runner and results visualizer called “temci”, and used GHC as a guinea pig. You can read his elaborate analysis on his blog.

  • Ready for a nostalgia kick? Usborne has put its old computer books on the web for free

    UK publishing house Usborne is giving out its iconic 1980s programming books as free downloads.

    The books, which are available for free as PDF files, include Usborne's introductions to programming series, adventure games, computer games listings and first computer series. The series was particularly popular in the UK, where they helped school a generation of developers and IT professionals.

  • LLVM Patches Confirm Google Has Its Own In-House Processor

    Patches published by Google developers today for LLVM/Clang confirm that the company has at least one in-house processor of its own.

    Jacques Pienaar, a software engineer at Google since 2014, posted patches today seeking to mainline a "Lanai" back-end inside LLVM. He explained they want to contribute their Lanai processor to the LLVM code-base as they continue developing this back-end with a focus on compiling C99 code. He mentions Lanai is a simple in-order 32-bit processor with 32 x 32-bit registers, two registers with fixed values, four used for program state tracking, and two reserved for explicit usage by user, and no floating point support.

Google Chrome Is Finally Getting Smooth Scrolling on Linux

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Development

The Google Chrome developers have released a new Beta version of their Internet browser, and they've added a lot of changes and improvements, including smooth scrolling.

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4MRecover 16.0 Distrolette Enters Beta, Includes TestDisk and PhotoRec 7.0

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Development
Linux

4MLinux developer Zbigniew Konojacki informs us about the immediate availability for download and testing of the first Beta build of the upcoming 4MRecover 16.0 Live CD.

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Development News

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Development
  • Kubernetes in 5 minutes

    Explain Kubernetes in just five minutes? Impossible, thought Jamie Duncan. But he did it anyway.

  • GPIO Zero and Raspberry Pi programming starter projects
  • Uzair Shamim: Writing A Hangman Game (Python)
  • Programmer Makes Self-driving Toy Car Powered By Raspberry Pi, Arduino, Python

    On his blog, Zheng explains that the complete system consists of three parts: the input unit, processing unit and the RC car control unit.

    The input unit consists of a Raspberry Pi Model B+ attached with a camera and an HC-SR04 ultrasonic sensor. This unit collects the data (color video and sensor data) that is sent to a computer over local WiFi with the help two client programs running on Pi.

    The processing unit receives the video data from Raspberry Pi and it’s converted to gray scale and decoded into numpy arrays. Zheng further explains the other jobs performed in the processing unit — “OpenCV Python neural network training and prediction (steering), object detection (stop sign and traffic light), distance measurement (monocular vision), and sending instructions to Arduino through USB connection.”

Tor Browser 6.0 Now in Development, Devs Switch the Guest VMs to Debian Wheezy

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Development
Security

We reported a couple of days ago that the Tor Project announced the release of the Firefox-based Tor Browser 5.5 anonymous web browser for all supported platforms, but they've also published details about the first Alpha build of the next major release.

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Java Woes

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Development
  • Java is going to die a slow painful death

    Java browser plugin, just like Adobe Flash has contributed heavily to making the web an insecure place. Both these technologies have compromised billions of PCs and Macs around the globe.

    The good news is that Oracle is finally pulling the plugs on Java, the browser plugin. Many people are freaking out, confusing it with Oracle’s Java language, which Linus Torvalds believes is a horrible language either way. Folks, this is about the Java browser plugin!

  • Oracle deprecates the Java browser plugin, prepares for its demise
  • Here’s Why Oracle Is Killing The Java Browser Plugin – A Good News For Plugin-free Web

    Oracle has announced that it’s removing the Java browser plugin from its future releases. In its whitepaper, the company said that the rise of web usage on mobile devices has inspired the browser vendors to look for plugin-free technologies. This plugin has been repeatedly exploited to install malware and attack users during its lifetime.

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