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Lakka – Transform Your Old PC into a Retrogaming Console

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GNU
Linux
Gaming

Lakka is a free, lightweight, and open-source Linux distro that turns a small PC into a full-blown game console. It features a beautiful and user-friendly UI with eye candy colours and a PS4-like User Experience.

You can install it on your SD card and easily set it up or run it LIVE. Its wide range of joypad support allows you to use PlayStation, XBox, and Nintendo game controllers.

If you don’t have a PC to use Lakka on you can dedicated hardware at a cost as low as $30 thanks to its support for a variety of computers not excluding Raspberry Pi, Raspberry 2, HummingBoard, Banana Po, Odroid, CuBox-i, Cubietruck, and Cubieboard 2.

Lakka is the official OS of RetroArch which takes care of its inputs and display, and it implements all game systems as a libretro core. This separation ensures that users are able to configure their setup once and have their changes effected across all game systems.

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Latest About GNU/Linux Software on Chromebooks

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GNU
Linux
Google
  • Linux Apps Coming To MediaTek-Powered Chromebooks Like The Acer R13

    Google made no mention of Linux apps on Chrome OS at last week’s hardware event in New York. I was a little surprised considering the fact that the Pixel Slate and Chrome OS saw nearly as much stage time as the Pixel phone that brought most of the media to Manhattan.

    [...]

    Unfortunately, the Chromebook R13 was quickly overshadowed by new flagships from Samsung and ASUS that featured more powerful processors and various features that made them more appealing to consumers. It was a sad happenstance for the Acer Chromebook because honestly, it is still a great device two years later. Seeing Google bring Linux apps to this device could breath much-needed new life into this model.

  • Linux app support coming to MediaTek-based Chromebooks

    Linux apps have arrived in the Chrome OS stable channel, but not all Chromebooks have access to them. The Linux container requires some kernel features that won't be backported to several models, but now Google is bringing the feature to a handful of MediaTek-based Chromebooks.

    Chrome Unboxed discovered a commit that enables Linux app support for the "oak" platform, which a number of Chromebooks were based on.

  • Linux apps on Chrome OS: An easy-to-follow guide

    The software that started out as a strictly web-centric entity — with everything revolving around the Chrome browser and apps that could operate inside it — is now one of modern computing's most versatile operating systems. Contemporary Chromebooks still run all the standard web-based stuff, of course, but they're also capable of connecting to Google's entire Play Store and running almost any Android app imaginable. And if that isn't enough, many models have recently gained the ability to run Linux apps as well.

GNU Gets Its Own 'CoC'

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GNU
  • Announcing the GNU Kind Communication Guidelines

    Announcing the GNU Kind Communication Guidelines

    The GNU Kind Communication Guidelines, initial version, have been
    published in https://gnu.org/philosophy/kind-communication.html. On
    behalf of the GNU Project, I ask all GNU contributors to make their
    best efforts to follow these guidelines in GNU Project discuaaions.

    In August, a discussion started among GNU package maintainers about
    the problem that GNU development often pushes women away.1 Clearly this is
    not a good thing.2

    Some maintainers advocated adopting a "code of conduct" with strict
    rules. Some other free software projects have done this, generating
    some resistance.3 Several GNU package maintainers responded that they
    would quit immediately. I myself did not like the punitive spirit of
    that approach, and decided against it.

    I did not, however, wish to make that an excuse to ignore the problem.
    So I decided to try a different approach: to guide participants to
    encourage and help each other to avoid harsh patterns of
    communication. I identified various patterns of our conversation
    (which is almost entirely textual, not vocal) that seem likely to
    chase women away -- and some men, too. Some patterns came from events
    that happened in the discussion itself. Then I wrote suggestions for
    how to avoid them and how to help others avoid them. I received
    feedback from many of the participants, including some women. I
    practiced some of these suggestions personally and found that they had
    a good effect. That list is now the GNU Kind Communication
    Guidelines.

    The current version not set in stone; I welcome comments and
    suggestions for future revision.

    The difference between kind communication guidelines and a code of
    conduct is a matter of the basic overall approach.

    A code of conduct states rules, with punishments for anyone that
    violates them. It is the heavy-handed way of teaching people to
    behave differently, and since it only comes into action when people do
    something against the rules, it doesn't try to teach people to do
    better than what the rules require. To be sure, the appointed
    maintainer(s) of a GNU package can, if necessary, tell a contributor
    to go away; but we do not want to need to have recourse to that.

    The idea of the GNU Kind Communication Guidelines is to start guiding
    people towards kinder communication at a point well before one would
    even think of saying, "You are breaking the rules." The way we do
    this, rather than ordering people to be kind or else, is try to help
    people learn to make their communication more kind.

    I hope that kind communication guidelines will provide a kinder
    and less strict way of leading a project's discussions to be calmer,
    more welcoming to all participants of good will, and more effective.

    1. I read that the fraction of women in the free software community
    overall is around 3%, whereas in the software field overall it is over
    10%.

    2. I disagree with making "diversity" a goal. If the developers in a
    specific free software project do not include demographic D, I don't
    think that the lack of them as a problem that requires action; there
    is no need to scramble desperately to recruit some Ds. Rather, the
    problem is that if we make demographic D feel unwelcome, we lose out
    on possible contributors. And very likely also others that are not in
    demographic D.

    There is a kind of diversity that would benefit many free software
    projects: diversity of users in regard to skill levels and kinds of
    usage. However, that is not what people usually mean by "diversity".

    3. I'm not involved in those projects, even if in some cases I use the
    software they release, so I am not directly concerned about whatever
    internal arrangements they make. They are pertinent here only as
    more-or-less comparable situations.

  • Richard Stallman Announces GNU Kind Communication Guidelines

    Richard Stallman has announced the GNU Kind Communication Guidelines. The GNU founder hopes these guidelines will encourage women to get involved in free software development and be more kind in project discussions.

    The GNU Kind Communication Guidelines is an effort to "to start guiding people towards kinder communication."

    The GNU Kind Communication Guidelines differ from a Code of Conduct in that it's trying to be proactive about kindness around free software development over being rules with possible actions when breaking them.

Linspire 8.0 RC1 Released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Today we are pleased to release RC1 of Linspire 8. As we approach our December release, huge strides in stability and functionality have been made with the release candidate. Even so, it should be used for testing only, not on production systems

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Mostly Hotly Sought-After Linux Skills

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GNU
Linux

The 2018 Open Source Technology Jobs Report shows rapid growth in the demand for open source technical talent, with Linux skills a must-have requirement for entry-level positions.

The seventh annual report from The Linux Foundation and Dice, released Wednesday, identifies Linux coding as the most sought-after open source skill. Linux-based container technology is a close second.

The report provides an overview of open source career trends, factors motivating professionals in the industry, and ways employers attract and retain qualified talent. As with the last two open source jobs reports, the focus this year is on all aspects of open source software and is not limited to Linux.

This year's report features data from more than 750 hiring managers at corporations, small and medium businesses, and government organizations and staffing agencies across the globe. It is based on responses from more than 6,500 open source professionals worldwide.

Linux skills rank as the most sought-after skills in the 2018 report, with 80 percent of hiring managers looking for tech professionals with Linux expertise.

Linux is required knowledge for most entry-level open source careers, likely due to the strong popularity of cloud and container technologies, as well as DevOps practices, all of which typically are based on Linux, according to the report.

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Desktop GNU/Linux: Chromebooks, LG, and 'World Domination'

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Google Will Improve Linux in Chrome OS with Folder Sharing and More
  • LG Gram Laptops To Be Better Supported By The Next Linux Kernel

    While LG isn't often thought of as a laptop manufacturer, their Gram laptop line-up has recently been making some waves. The LG Gram laptops are powered by Intel Core CPUs and are designed to be slim and sleek yet durable. With the next Linux kernel (4.20~5.0), they should be better supported should you want to wipe the default Microsoft Windows installation.

  • When the Problem Is the Story

    That's because Linux has achieved the world domination it longed for in the early years.

    Yes, Linus as a character got interesting for a few minutes last month (top results in a Google News search for "Linus Torvalds" range from 22 to 29 days old), but that story is too stale to be interesting now, even though the issues around it still matter.

    And that's my point here. Lots of subjects matter that stories do a lousy job of telling.

    But to journalism, and to the human beings journalism addresses, stories matter more than anything. Stories are clearly the base format of human interest.

Hacker friendly LapPi laptop kit runs on Raspberry Pi 3B+

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

SB Components is Kickstartering a Raspberry Pi based “LapPi” laptop kit with 7- or 5-inch screens, keyboard, camera, speakers, and 3800mAh battery, starting at $220 with an RPi 3B+ or $178 without.

SB Components has successfully funded its DIY LapPi kit on Kickstarter, and packages are available through Nov. 10 with December delivery. The company is known for its PiTalk smartphone and other Raspberry Pi add-on kits, which are available as options.

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Suddenly Linux runs in Android

Filed under
Android
GNU
Linux

Yes, Android is based on a modified version of the Linux kernel. But once you’ve got Android running, you can utilize this app to get Linux running inside Android. But why, you might be asking – why would you want to do that? If you have to ask, you might just want to turn back now. With this app, users are able to run Debian or Ubuntu, games like Adventure or Zork, and Math systems like Gnuplot, Octave, and R.

UserLand allows one Session at a time and can also monitor filesystems. If you’re looking for a graphical interface, and not just a command line system, you might want to take a peek at the operating system Android. In other words: This is mostly just for fun, and a sort of proof of concept – but it has so much potential!

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Love Microsoft Teams? Love Linux? Then you won't love this

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Microsoft loves Linux. Unless you are a Linux user who happens to want to use Teams. In that case, you probably aren’t feeling the love quite so much.

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Keynotes announced for LibrePlanet 2019 free software conference

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GNU
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Games: Ion Maiden, Hazelnut Bastille and More

Graphics: NVIDIA, ATI RAGE and Phoronix Test Suite a Decade Later

  • New LTS Kernel 4.19 and NVidia Patch
    Under 24h after Linux Kernel 4.19 LTS is released by Greg, Patrick decided to bump the kernel used in -current to the latest LTS release. This new major version brings tons of new and interesting features, as written in Kernel Newbies. [...] I'm pretty sure it will showed up soon enough as KDE 5 is getting more stable and polished. It has been tested by Eric (and some other) for some time and it's proven to be solid.
  • A 2018 Autumn Linux Driver Update For The ATI RAGE 128 Series
    The open-source display driver for supporting these graphics cards where 32MB of SDRAM was suitable, 250 nm fabrication was standard, and core clocks around 100MHz were competitive is still being maintained... Two decades after the release of the ATI RAGE series, the open-source Linux driver continues seeing some activity and in fact a new driver release. The lone independent driver contributor ushering along the RAGE driver (xf86-video-r128) is Kevin Brace who started working on the VIA OpenChrome open-source driver in recent years and for the past number of months recently shifted focus to the classic RAGE driver. He released the xf86-video-r128 6.12.0 driver today to address two build failures. Besides addressing build problems, he also began writing some of the XAA/EXA 2D acceleration code. He did note of the changes to the 2D acceleration code paths, "It is always possible that I can mess up the code, but it appears that the code is working correctly."
  • OpenBenchmarking.org Serves Up Its 35 Millionth Test Profile/Suite Benchmark Download
    Just a little more than one month after crossing 34 million downloads, the 35,000,000 milestone was achieved -- continuing the trend that's been going on for the past number of quarters. OpenBenchmarking.org serves test profiles/suites separate from the Phoronix Test Suite package itself to allow new tests to be easily introduced without having to upgrade the PTS client itself, update existing tests with version controls, etc. OpenBenchmarking.org is also what allows users to upload their own test results publicly, obtain various hardware/software statistics, and much more.

Fedora Toolbox ready for testing!

As many of you know we kicked of a ambitious goal to revamp the Linux desktop when we launched Fedora Workstation 4 years. We wanted to remove many of the barriers to adoption of Linux as a desktop and make it a better operating system for all, especially for developers. To that effect we have been pushing a long range of initiatives over the last 4 years ago, ranging from providing a better input stack through libinput, a better display system through Wayland, a better audio and video subsystem through PipeWire, a better way of doing application packaging and dependency handling through Flatpak, a better application installation history through GNOME Software, actual firmware handling for Linux through Linux Vendor Firmware Service, better manageability through Fleet Commander, and Project Silverblue for reliable OS updates. We also had a lot of efforts done to improve general hardware handling, be that work on glvnd and friends for dealing with NVidia driver, the Bolt project for handling Thunderbolt devices better, HiDPI support in the desktop, better touch support in the desktop, improved laptop battery life, and ongoing work to improve state of fingerprint readers under Linux and to provide a flicker free boot experience. Read more