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Distribution Releases

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD
  • OpenMandriva Is Going To Do Away With 32-bit Support

    Following in the steps of Ubuntu 17.10 dropping 32-bit desktop images and other Linux distributions also lessening their focus on 32-bit support, OpenMandriva has issued its final i586 release.

    OpenMandriva Lx 3.03 was released on Tuesday with boot speed improvements, updates to Linux/systemd/Mesa, KDE Plasma 5.10.5, LLVM Clang 5.0, and other package upgrades. This is also going to be their last planned release in the OpenMandriva Lx 3 series.

  • OpenMandriva Lx 3.03 - Get it while it’s hot!

    This release Lx 3.03 is an enhancement and upgrade to the previous Lx 3 releases.

  • LXLE 16.04.3 "Eclectica" Linux Distro Is Out Now Based on Ubuntu 16.04.3 LTS

    The developers of the Ubuntu-based LXLE GNU/Linux distribution have announced the release of LXLE 16.04.3, the latest update to the Eclectica series based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus).

    Incorporating all the updates and core components of Ubuntu 16.04.3 LTS, the LXLE 16.04.3 release is here to further integrate various of the components of the MATE and LXQt desktop environments, as well as some from the Linux Mint operating system.

    On top of that, the application menu received improvements to its layout and how items are organization, the system theme was tweaked for consistency, LXhotkey replaces the Obkey Openbox key editor, and Pithos has been removed because it required a user account.

  • pfSense 2.4.2 Open-Source Firewall Patches OpenSSL, Improves Network Performance

    Netgate's Jim Pingle announced the availability of the second maintenance and stabilization update to the latest 2.4 series of pfSense, world's most trusted open-source firewall.

    pfSense 2.4.2 is a security and bugfix release that updates the OpenSSL packages to version 1.0.2m to fix two recently disclosed vulnerabilities (CVE-2017-3736 and CVE-2017-3735), addresses three potential XSS vectors, fixes the VLAN priority handling, and addresses issues with PPP interfaces that have VLAN parents.

Samsung DeX will finally give life to the Linux smartphone

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux

Remember when Canonical was doing everything they could to bring convergence between the Linux desktop and the Ubuntu Phone? They worked tirelessly to make it happen, only to fall short of that goal. This effort was preceded by Ubuntu Edge—a smartphone that, by itself, would bridge the mobile device and the desktop. That failed as well, but the intent was the same.

For those that aren't familiar, the idea behind convergence is simple: Offer a single device that could serve as both a smartphone handset, and when connected to a monitor work as a standard desktop computer. The idea is quite brilliant and makes perfect sense. Especially when you remember how many people use a smartphone as their only means of either connecting to the world or productivity. With that number growing every year, the idea of convergence becomes even more important. Give them one device that could function in two very important ways.

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Also: Samsung Galaxy S8 Icon Theme for KDE Plasma

PINE64 PINEBOOK Review — Is This $89 Linux Laptop Worth it?

Filed under
GNU
Linux

A while back, there were articles circulating about the “World’s Cheapest Laptop,” but they really weren’t accurate. The PINEBOOK weighs in at $89USD for the 11″ model and $99USD for the 14″ model. But, can a sub-$100 laptop, new or used, really be worth it? It would almost be unanymously be argued not, but the PINEBOOK makes a very compelling case. Let’s tell you about it in detail.

PINE64, the company behind the first budget/hobbyist 64bit single board computer by the same name, has started offering a lot more in the alternative computing arena. They have a wide variety of inventory on their website containing all sorts of odds and ends in addition to the flagship offerings. Everything a tinkerer might need, from microSD cards to USB wifi, USB ethernet, even power over ethernet broken-out into a DC barrel adapter and LCD panels, all for very appealing prices.

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Also: Surface Book 2 can’t stay charged during gaming sessions

LXLE Eclectica 16.04.3 Released

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

LXLE 16.04.3 is built upon Ubuntu Mini LTS. Lubuntu-core is used as a starting point.

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LibreELEC (Krypton) v8.2.1 MR

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Movies

LibreELEC 8.2.1 is a maintenance release that includes Kodi 17.6. It also resolves a minor time-zone issue after recent daylight saving changes, a resume from suspend issue with the Apple IR driver, and it provides two new SMB client configuration options in Kodi settings. You can now set a minimum SMB protocol version to prevent prevent SMB1 from ever being used, and a ‘legacy security’ option forces weak authentication to resolve issues seen with the USB sharing functions on some older router/NAS devices. If updating to LibreELEC 8.2 for the first time PLEASE READ THE RELEASE NOTES below here before posting issues in the forums as there are disruptive changes to Lirc, Samba, and Tvheadend.

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GNU Linux-libre 4.14-gnu: -ENOFIRMWARE is now available

Filed under
GNU
Linux

GNU Linux-libre 4.14-gnu sources and tarballs are now available at
http://www.fsfla.org/selibre/linux-libre/download/releases/4.14-gnu/ .
It didn't require any deblobbing changes since -rc6-gnu. Binaries are
expected to show up over the next few days.

The biggest change in this release is that the firmware subtree was
removed upstream (thus the codename -ENOFIRMWARE), removing from the
Linux kernel distribution a few pieces of Free firmware, and a number of
non-Free ones. Alas, there are still a few pieces of non-Free firmware
remaining in Linux 4.14; hopefully this problem will be addressed in a
future release, and Linux will then be Free Software again. For the
time being, it still requires some cleaning up to be Free Software, and
plenty of additional cleaning up to meet the GNU Free Software
Distribution Guidelines.

The larger problem, that several drivers in Linux will not work at all
unless you provide them with pieces of proprietary software, is not
affected by this move: the drivers still refuse to work, a number of
them for no good reason, and the non-Free firmware is still demanded by
the upstream drivers, it is just distributed separately. This avoids
legal problems for distributors of the kernel Linux, who refrain from
distributing the non-Free firmware. However, that a number of drivers
and corresponding firwmare are updated in lockstep suggests that they
might actually be a single program, in spite of running on separate CPUs
and having pieces distributed separately, and it might even be the case
that the firmware happens to be a derivative work of the kernel. If
that is so, those who distribute them together, or even just the
firmware by itself, might be in violation of the terms of the GNU GPL,
the Linux license, and thus losing their license to distribute Linux!

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Also: GNU Linux-libre 4.14-gnu Released, Still A Battle Deblobbing Driver Firmware

6 Reasons Why Linux is Better than Windows For Servers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server
Microsoft

A server is a computer software or a machine that offers services to other programs or devices, referred to as “clients“. There are different types of servers: web servers, database servers, application servers, cloud computing servers, file servers, mail servers, DNS servers and much more.

The usage share for Unix-like operating systems has over the years greatly improved, predominantly on servers, with Linux distributions at the forefront. Today a bigger percentage of servers on the Internet and data centers around the world are running a Linux-based operating system.

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Also: All the supercomputers in the world moved to Linux operating systems

A soft push for the fairer sex

Filed under
GNU
Linux

International Centre for Free and Open Source Software (ICFOSS), an autonomous institution under Government of Kerala and Society for Promotion of Alternative Computing and Employment (SPACE), an NGO promoting free software, have been conducting ‘Women Hackers,’ a project to bring more women into free software. The programme involves intensive residential workshops on college campuses.

It was during one such hackathon that the idea for ‘I install’ was put forward by the students of LBS College of Engineering, Kasaragod. A GNU/Linux installation camp, the event aims to promote the idea of taking control over the technology that you use. Those students who received training at the hackathon will be part of ‘I install’ where they impart their learning to other students.

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Programming: GNU Nano, Software Engineering Talent Shortage, HHVM (PHP)

Filed under
Development
GNU
  • GNU Nano Latest Version 2.9.0

    GNU nano 2.9.0 "Eta" introduces the ability to record and
    replay keystrokes (M-: to start and stop recording, M-;
    to play the macro back), makes ^Q and ^S do something
    useful by default (^Q starts a backward search, and ^S
    saves the current file), changes ^W to start always a
    forward search, shows the number of open buffers (when
    more than one) in the title bar, no longer asks to press
    Enter when there are errors in an rc file, retires the
    options '--quiet' and 'set quiet' and 'set backwards',
    makes indenting and unindenting undoable, will look in
    $XDG_CONFIG_HOME for a nanorc file and in $XDG_DATA_HOME
    for the history files, adds a history stack for executed
    commands (^R^X), does not overwrite the position-history
    file of another nano, and fixes a score of tiny bugs.

  • GNU Nano Text Editor Can Now Record & Replay Keystrokes

    GNU Nano 2.9 is now available as the latest feature release of this popular CLI text editor and it's bringing several new capabilities.

    First up, GNU Nano 2.9 has the ability to record and replay keystrokes within the text editor. M-: is used to start/stop the keystroke recording session while M-; is used to playback the macro / recorded keystrokes.

  • 2018's Software Engineering Talent Shortage— It’s quality, not just quantity

    The software engineering shortage is not a lack of individuals calling themselves “engineers”, the shortage is one of quality — a lack of well-studied, experienced engineers with a formal and deep understanding of software engineering.

  • HHVM 3.23

    HHVM 3.23 is released! This release contains new features, bug fixes, performance improvements, and supporting work for future improvements. Packages have been published in the usual places, however we have rotated the GPG key used to sign packages; see the installation instructions for more information.

  • Facebook Releases HHVM 3.23 With OpenSSL 1.1 Support, Experimental Bytecode Emitter

    HHVM 3.23 has been released as their high performance virtual machine for powering their Hack programming language and current PHP support.

    As mentioned back in September though, Facebook will stop focusing on PHP 7 compatibility in favor of driving their own Hack programming language forward. It's after their next release, HHVM 3.24, in early 2018 they will stop their commitment to supporting PHP5 features and at the same time not focus on PHP7 support. Due to the advancements made by upstream PHP on improving their performance, etc, Facebook is diverting their attention to instead just bolstering Hack and thus overtime the PHP support within HHVM will degrade.

Open Linux – Beyond distributions, regressions and rivalry

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I love Linux. Which is why, whenever there’s a new distro release and it’s less than optimal (read, horrible), a unicorn dies somewhere. And since unicorns are pretty much mythical, it tells you how bad the situation is. On a more serious note, I’ve started my autumn crop of distro testing, and the results are rather discouraging. Worse than just bad results, we get inconsistent results. This is possibly even worse than having a product that works badly. The wild emotional seesaw of love-hate, hope-despair plays havoc with users and their loyalty.

Looking back to similar tests in previous years, it’s as if nothing has changed. We’re spinning. Literally. Distro releases happen in a sort of intellectual vacuum, isolated from one another, with little to no cross-cooperation or cohesion. This got me thinking. Are there any mechanisms that could help strengthen partnership among different distro teams, so that our desktops looks and behave with more quality and consistency?

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