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NuTyX 11.2 Available

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I'm very pleased to announce the new NuTyX 11.2 release.

The 64-bit version contains more than 2800 packages upgraded.

The 32-bit version of NuTyX, still actively supported contains more then 1800 packages upgraded.

In the newest release, base NuTyX comes with the Long-Term Support (LTS) kernel 4.19.79 (4.9.196 for the 32-bit version).

For 64-bit systems,the kernel release 5.3.6 is also available.

The gnu compiler collection, gcc, is now gcc 9.2.0.

The graphical server is xorg-server 1.20.5.

The mesa lib is 19.2.1, gtk3 is 3.24.12, and qt has been updated to 5.13.1.

Python interpreters 3.7.4 and 2.7.16 have been included in this release.

The MATE Desktop Environment comes in 1.22.2, the latest version.

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Project Trident 2020 OS Migration

Filed under
OS
GNU
Linux
BSD

After several months of examination and testing of the various operating systems that are available right now, we have reached a conclusion. Project Trident will rebasing with Void Linux.

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Also: Project Trident Switching From TrueOS/FreeBSD Distribution To Basing On Void Linux

GNU Debugger and the FSF Coup

Filed under
GNU
  • Installing Gerrit and Keycloak for GDB

    Back in September, we had the GNU Tools Cauldron in the gorgeous city of Montréal (perhaps I should write a post specifically about it...). One of the sessions we had was the GDB BoF, where we discussed, among other things, how to improve our patch review system.

    I have my own personal opinions about the current review system we use (mailing list-based, in a nutshell), and I haven't felt very confident to express it during the discussion. Anyway, the outcome was that at least 3 global maintainers have used or are currently using the Gerrit Code Review system for other projects, are happy with it, and that we should give it a try. Then, when it was time to decide who wanted to configure and set things up for the community, I volunteered. Hey, I'm already running the Buildbot master for GDB, what is the problem to manage yet another service? Oh, well.

    Before we dive into the details involved in configuring and running gerrit in a machine, let me first say that I don't totally support the idea of migrating from mailing list to gerrit. I volunteered to set things up because I felt the community (or at least the its most active members) wanted to try it out. I don't necessarily agree with the choice.

    Ah, and I'm writing this post mostly because I want to be able to close the 300+ tabs I had to open on my Firefox during these last weeks, when I was searching how to solve the myriad of problems I faced during the set up!

  • Bradley M. Kuhn: On Recent Controversial Events

    The last 33 days have been unprecedentedly difficult for the software freedom community and for me personally. Folks have been emailing, phoning, texting, tagging me on social media (— the last of which has been funny, because all my social media accounts are placeholder accounts). But, just about everyone has urged me to comment on the serious issues that the software freedom community now faces. Until now, I have stayed silent regarding all these current topics: from Richard M. Stallman (RMS)'s public statements, to his resignation from the Free Software Foundation (FSF), to the Epstein scandal and its connection to MIT. I've also avoided generally commenting on software freedom organization governance during this period. I did this for good reason, which is explained below. However, in this blog post, I now share my primary comments on the matters that seem to currently be of the utmost attention of the Open Source and Free Software communities.

    I have been silent the last month because, until two days ago, I was an at-large member of FSF's Board of Directors, and a Voting Member of the FSF. As a member of FSF's two leadership bodies, I was abiding by a reasonable request from the FSF management and my duty to the organization. Specifically, the FSF asked that all communication during the crisis come directly from FSF officers and not from at-large directors and/or Voting Members. Furthermore, the FSF management asked all Directors and Voting Members to remain silent on this entire matter — even on issues only tangentially related to the current situation, and even when speaking in our own capacity (e.g., on our own blogs like this one). The FSF is an important organization, and I take any request from the FSF seriously — so I abided fully with their request.

    The situation was further complicated because folks at my employer, Software Freedom Conservancy (where I also serve on the Board of Directors) had strong opinions about this matter as well. Fortunately, the FSF and Conservancy both had already created clear protocols for what I should do if ever there was a disagreement or divergence of views between Conservancy and FSF. I therefore was recused fully from the planning, drafting, and timing of Conservancy's statement on this matter. I thank my colleagues at the Conservancy for working so carefully to keep me entirely outside the loop on their statement and to diligently assure that it was straight-forward for me to manage any potential organizational disagreements. I also thank those at the FSF who outlined clear protocols (ahead of time, back in March 2019) in case a situation like this ever came up. I also know my colleagues at Conservancy care deeply, as I do, about the health and welfare of the FSF and its mission of fighting for universal software freedom for all. None of us want, nor have, any substantive disagreement over software freedom issues.

    I take very seriously my duty to the various organizations where I have (or have had) affiliations. More generally, I champion non-profit organizational transparency. Unfortunately, the current crisis left me in a quandary between the overarching goal of community transparency and abiding by FSF management's directives. Now that I've left the FSF Board of Directors, FSF's Voting Membership, and all my FSF volunteer roles (which ends my 22-year uninterrupted affiliation with the FSF), I can now comment on the substantive issues that face not just the FSF, but the Free Software community as a whole, while continuing to adhere to my past duty of acting in FSF's best interest. In other words, my affiliation with the FSF has come to an end for many good and useful reasons. The end to this affiliation allows me to speak directly about the core issues at the heart of the community's current crisis.

  • Meet the FSF staff in Raleigh, NC on October 15

    On Tuesday, October 15th, the Free Software Foundation (FSF) staff would like to meet you at a social event at Raleigh's Whiskey Kitchen!

    Executive director John Sullivan, licensing and compliance manager Donald R. Robertson, III, copyright and licensing associate Craig Topham, and program manager Zoë Kooyman, will all be in Raleigh, NC on October 15th, in anticipation of this year's licensing seminar on GPL Enforcement and Legal Ethics.

    We look forward to hosting this informal meetup to show our appreciation for your support of the FSF's work. We'll share some bites and drinks while giving you the opportunity to meet other FSF associate members and supporters while learning about what the FSF is currently working on. We are curious to hear your thoughts, and would love to answer any questions you may have.

Audiocasts/Shows/Screencasts: Linux Headlines, ArcoLinux 19.10.1 Run Through and More

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • 2019-10-15 | Linux Headlines

    A double dose of Python, AWS credits for open source projects, a new kernel development course from the Linux Foundation, and an exciting release for KDE Plasma.

  • A Chat with Allan Jude | Jupiter Extras 22

    Brent sits down for an in-person chat with Allan Jude for a retrospective storytelling of his beginnings in BSD, his long history with podcasting, BSDNow and Jupiter Broadcasting, a beginner's guide to the benefits of FreeBSD, with technical nuggets and nostalgic bits throughout.

    Allan Jude wears many hats including FreeBSD developer and member of the FreeBSD Core team, ZFS expert, co-founder and VP Engineering at Klara Inc., co-founder and VP Operations at ScaleEngine Inc., host of BSDNow, former host of TechSNAP among many others.

  • Podcast.__init__: Andrew's Adventures In Coderland

    Software development is a unique profession in many ways, and it has given rise to its own subculture due to the unique sets of challenges that face developers. Andrew Smith is an author who is working on a book to share his experiences learning to program, and understand the impact that software is having on our world. In this episode he shares his thoughts on programmer culture, his experiences with Python and other language communities, and how learning to code has changed his views on the world. It was interesting getting an anthropological perspective from a relative newcomer to the world of software.

    [...]

    Software development is a unique profession in many ways, and it has given rise to its own subculture due to the unique sets of challenges that face developers. Andrew Smith is an author who is working on a book to share his experiences learning to program, and understand the impact that software is having on our world. In this episode he shares his thoughts on programmer culture, his experiences with Python and other language communities, and how learning to code has changed his views on the world. It was interesting getting an anthropological perspective from a relative newcomer to the world of software.

  • 2019-10-14 | Linux Headlines

    Perl 6 is renamed, AWS goes metal with ARM, OnionShare just got a big upgrade, and Google has a new security dongle.

  • ArcoLinux 19.10.1 Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at ArcoLinux 19.10.1. Enjoy!

KDE neon 5.17

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux

KDE neon 5.17 is out. You can upgrade your existing KDE neon User Edition install or install fresh from an ISO image or run the Docker image. Featuring Plasma 5.17 it is packed full of new features according to OMG Ubuntu.

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7 Linux Applications You Should Start Using Right Now

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

Linux used to be the go-to operating system among the tech-savvy crowd. Because back in the day, it was a lot more demanding to use. Now Linux has modern, user-friendly distributions such as Ubuntu and Mint. The application repository they have in common has matured too. Customizing it to your heart’s desire is now easier than ever before. And this should be the end goal — to mold the OS into a tool that’s custom-tailored to your needs. So if you haven’t already, consider installing the following types of applications.

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Meet the Villupuram group of engineers educating students about free and open software

Filed under
GNU

A small group of software engineers are changing the face of computer education in Tamil Nadu’s Villupuram, empowering students from working class families by giving them a strong foundation in software programming. The Villupuram GNU/Linux Users Group (GLUG) is a not-for-profit initiative by a group of software professionals and students who believe in software freedom.

Stared in 2013 by a group of six software engineers, the Villupuram chapter of GLUG was formed as part of a global social movement aimed at educating people about free software.

Vijisulochana (Viji), the group’s current representative, tells TNM that the Villupuram GLUG is focused on training interested students so as to make them technically strong.

“Students can always get trained in software training centres, but those centres may not be best equipped to teach them all the latest software developments. We also choose a handful of deserving students based out of Villupuram for whom travelling to Chennai or to other centres in town may not be financially viable. Here, we do it for free,” she says. Their weekly sessions are attended by hundreds of students.

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16 Places To Buy A Linux Laptop With Linux Preloaded

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

Are you looking for Linux laptops? Do you want a Linux system without having to pay a Microsoft tax? The hardest part of using Linux is to find out the correct hardware. Hardware compatibility and drivers can be a big issue. But where one can find Linux desktops or Laptop for sale? Here are sixteen places to buy a preinstalled Linux Desktop and Laptop.

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New Videos: A Look at Xubuntu 19.10 and Crunchbang++ 10

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Linux Fu: Python GUIs For Command Line Programs (Almost) Instantly

Filed under
Development
GNU
Linux
HowTos

Not every programmer likes creating GUI code. Most hacker types don’t mind a command line interface, but very few ordinary users appreciate them. However, if you write command line programs in Python, Gooey can help. By leveraging some Python features and a common Python idiom, you can convert a command line program into a GUI with very little effort.

The idea is pretty simple. Nearly all command line Python programs use argparse to simplify picking options and arguments off the command line as well as providing some help. The Gooey decorator picks up all your options and arguments and creates a GUI for it. You can make it more complicated if you want to change specific things, but if you are happy with the defaults, there’s not much else to it.

At first, this article might seem like a Python Fu and not a Linux Fu, since — at first — we are going to focus on Python. But just stand by and you’ll see how this can do a lot of things on many operating systems, including Linux.

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Also: Applying C - Running Programs With Systemd

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