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Lenovo ThinkPad P Laptops Are Available with Ubuntu

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Dell may be the best-known Linux laptop vendor right now, but Lenovo is looking to muscle in on the pre-installed Linux machine market.

All of Lenovo’s refreshed ThinkPad P series laptops will be available to buy with Ubuntu 18.04 LTS preinstalled when they go on sale in the US later this month.

Oddly, Lenovo doesn’t mention Linux availability in their press release introducing the new ThinkPad P series laptops, but eagle-eyed Linux users spotted the additional OS option on when investigating the laptop’s ‘tech specs’ on the Lenovo website.

The company says its refreshed P-series ‘portfolio’ is “…is designed to meet the ever-changing power and portability needs of modern professionals across industries – both in the office and beyond without sacrificing our legendary engineering know-how, reliability and security.”

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Also: How to install Lubuntu Linux OS on PC via USB stick/drive

Move to pay Debian devs for project work rears its head again

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GNU
Linux
Debian

The idea of paying developers to work on Debian GNU/Linux packages has reared its head again, with senior developer Raphael Hertzog proposing that project funds be used for the purpose.

Hertzog made the suggestion in a reply to a post on one of the project's mailing lists which was part of a thread on the subject "Why do we take so long to realise good ideas?"

"Use the $300,000 on our bank accounts?", he wrote, adding that he had heard of another US$300,000 donation made by Google to the project though he was unable to find any publicly accessible reference to it.

The idea of paying developers for their work on what is a community project was raised 13 years ago by former project leader Anthony Towns, with the reason being the speeding up of development so that releases could take place sooner. The idea did not prove very popular as it was meant to be run outside the project proper and was meant to pay core members for their work.

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Compilers: GCC 10 and LLVM Clang 9.0

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GNU
BSD
  • GCC 10 Lands Support For Targeting TI's 32-bit PRU Processor

    New to the GCC 10 compiler code-base this week is a port for the Texas Instruments Programmable Real-Time Unit (PRU) processor found on various boards, including the likes of the BeagleBone Arm SBCs.

    The TI programmable real-time unit (PRU) is a processor on some TI boards that offers two 32-bit cores running at 200MHz. The PRU offers single-cycle I/O access and full access to the system's internal memory and peripherals. Texas Instruments has offered a proprietary toolchain for writing Assembly code to run on the PRU while now an independent developer has landed the GCC port for targeting this unique processor.

  • Clang-Scan-Deps Lands In Clang 9.0 For Much Faster Dependency Scanning

    Landing this week in the LLVM Clang 9.0 development code-base is the new clang-scan-deps tool for much faster scanning of files for dependencies compared to the traditional pre-processor based approach.

    Development of clang-scan-deps was led by Apple's compiler team and delivers up to around ten (10) times faster performance for scanning of dependencies/modules before compiling compared to the pre-processor-based scanning.

Information stalls at Linux Week and Veganmania in Vienna

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GNU
Linux

The information stall at the Linux weeks event in May was somewhat limited due to the fact that we didn’t get our usual posters and the roll-up in time. Unfortunately we discovered too late that they had obviously been lent out for an other event and hadn’t been returned afterwards. So we could only use our information material. But since at this event the FSFE is very well known, it wasn’t hard at all to carry out our usual information stall. It’s less about outreach work and more of a who-is-who of the free software community in Vienna anyway. For three days we met old friends and networked. Of course some newbies found their way to the event also. And therefore we could spread our messages a little further too.

In addition, we once again provided well visited workshops for Inkscape and Gimp. The little talk on the free rally game Trigger Rally even motivated an attending dedicated Fedora maintainer to create an up-to-date .rpm package in order to enable distribution of the most recent release to rpm distros.

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Enviro+ Is A Raspberry Pi Accessory To Monitor Air Quality

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

There are many Raspberry Pi accessories available in the market but there are very few boards that are as cool and useful as Enviro+.

Developed by Pimoroni in collaboration with the researchers from the University of Sheffield, it is a board with a couple of environmental sensors and a small LCD display for monitoring data.

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EndeavourOS Is Hoping To Be The Successor To Antergos - Convenient To Use Arch Linux

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GNU
Linux

Details are light up to this point but in fifteen days EndeavourOS will be announced as a new Arch-based Linux distribution aiming to continue where Antergos Linux left off.

For those that missed it, last month the Antergos Linux developers discontinued their OS due to a lack of time to devote to their open-source project. There's now a new development team spearheading work on a new initiative called "EndeavourOS" that hopes to be its spiritual successor.

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Also new: Yes, It's that time again! Kwort 4.3.4 is out

Differences between Four Linux Mint Editions

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GNU
Linux

If you look at the web, it's rare to find a resource to explain the differences between all 4 Linux Mint editions (Cinnamon, MATE, XFCE, and Debian). If you are looking for such explanation, then this brief article is for you. I hope you will find edition you love the most from GNU/Linux Mint.

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Tmax OS Releases Open Source OS as an Alternative to MS Windows

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GNU
Linux

Tmax OS will release the Open Edition (OE) of the Tmax Operating System (OS), an open source version of the Tmax OS that anyone can freely use. This will create an ecosystem for an alternative OS to Microsoft's (MS) Windows.

The Tmax OS OE has the same functionality as the existing Tmax OS commercial version, except that it limits some functions for the enterprise environment. Users can use a variety of applications such as Linux-based apps as well as its self-developed office program Two Office and the web browser Two Gate.

Tmax emphasized that it can provide stable and continuous Tmax OS OE upgrade and technical support as it has more than 400 professional researchers and technical personnel. Its graphical environment makes it easy for new MS Windows users to use the Tmax OS OE.

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My personal journey from MIT to GPL

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GNU
Legal

As I got started writing open source software, I generally preferred the MIT license. I actually made fun of the “copyleft” GPL licenses, on the grounds that they are less free. I still hold this opinion today: the GPL license is less free than the MIT license - but today, I believe this in a good way.

[...]

I don’t plan on relicensing my historical projects, but my new projects have used the GPL family of licenses for a while now. I think you should seriously consider it as well.

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How To Test Drive 200+ Linux Distributions Without Ever Downloading Or Installing Them

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GNU
Linux

Basically you browse or search for the Linux distro you want to test (you can also filter the site by the very newest releases) and then click Start. The equivalent of booting up the Live ISO or installer image is streamed to your browser in a separate window via NoVNC, but you can also connect to the system on a locally installed VNC client -- the server's IP address and port are provided after you start your session.

I found I only needed to wait a few seconds for each distribution to load, and occasionally you may enter a queue to manage the server side's bandwidth load. Then you'll have a full two hours to treat the distro as your own. Add or remove software, tweak configuration files, partition and format hard drives, whatever you desire. Once you shut it down, the system is wiped clean.

You'll get a faster and smoother experience running these on your own hardware -- or even from locally installed Virtual Machine software -- but first impressions are everything, and DistroTest is a brilliant way to acquire that first impression!

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