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GNU

GNU lightning 2.1.3 released!

Filed under
GNU

GNU lightning is a library to aid in making portable programs 
that compile assembly code at run time. 
Development: 
http://git.savannah.gnu.org/cgit/lightning.git 
Download release: 
ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/lightning/lightning-2.1.3.tar.gz 
  2.1.3 main features are the new RISC-V port, currently supporting 
only Linux 64 bit, and a major rewrite of the register live and 
unknown state logic, so that a long standing issue with a live 
register not accessed for several consecutive blocks could be 
incorrectly assumed dead. 
The matrix of built and tested environments is: 
aarch64	 Linux (Linaro, Foundation_v8pkg) 
alpha	 Linux (QEMU) 
armv7l	 Linux (QEMU) 
armv7hl	 Linux (QEMU) 
hppa	 Linux (32 bit, QEMU) 
i686	 Linux and Cygwin 
ia64	 Linux 
mips	 Linux (32 bit) 
powerpc32	Linux 
powerpc64	Linux and AIX 
powerpc64le	Linux 
riscv	 Linux (64 bit, QEMU) 
s390	 Linux (Hercules) 
s390x	 Linux (Hercules) 
sparc	 Linux (QEMU) 
sparc64	 Linux (QEMU) 
x32	 Linux (QEMU) 
x86_64	 Linux and Cygwin 

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The [EndeavourOS] September release has arrived

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The ISO contains:

Linux kernel 5.2.14
Mesa 19.1.6
Systemd 243.0
Firefox 69 (Quantum)
Arc-x-icons, a more complete and updated version than the Arc icon set used previously.
The new EndeavourOS welcome launcher on both the live environment as on the installed system. It’s a one-click menu to the wiki for the basic system commands and setting up your hardware.
Our Nvidia-installer is now installed by default which now also installs the dkms drivers.
Gtop system monitor, a nice terminal-based system load monitor that launches from the panel.

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Audiocasts/Shows: Linux Headlines, Void Linux, This Week in Linux and LINUX Unplugged

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Linux Distribution Comparison

Filed under
GNU
Linux

There are currently nearly 300 active Linux distributions, which makes choosing just one somewhat difficult, especially if you would rather make your own informed decision instead of relying on the recommendation of someone else. The good news is that the number of major Linux distributions, which stand out in a significant way and are more than simple reskins of existing distributions, is much smaller.
If we were to represent the world of Linux distribution as a map, the 10 distributions listed in this article would be the continents of the world, while other distributions would be islands of various sizes. Just like there is no “best” continent in the real world, the same holds true in the world of Linux distributions.

Each Linux distribution is designed with a different use case in mind, and the same distribution can be perfect for one user and unusable for another one. That’s why the distributions in this article aren’t listed in any particular order and are numbered just for the sake of convenience.

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Purism: A Privacy Based Computer Company

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gadgets

It all started when Todd Weaver, Founder and CEO of Purism, realized Big Tech could not be trusted as moral guardians of his and his children’s data. The current paradigm of corporations data hoarding is, as Todd describes it, built on “a tech-stack of exploitation”–and not by accident, but by design. Companies such as Google and Microsoft–and especially Facebook–intentionally collect, store and share user data to whomever they see fit. In recent events, the California Consumer Privacy Act, which becomes effective on January 1, 2020, will make residents of California able to know what personal data is being collected about them, know whether their personal data is sold or disclosed and to whom, say no to the sale of personal data, access their personal data, request a business delete any personal data information about a consumer collected from that consumer and not be discriminated against for exercising their privacy rights. This sounds good, and it is, but not according to Big Tech. Big Tech such as Facebook hired a firm to run ads that said things like “Your next click could cost you $5! Say no to the California Consumer Privacy Act”. Big Tech does not care about privacy, they care about their bottom line. This is where Purism comes in.

Purism is a privacy focused company. Their devices, the Librem5, Librem13 and Librem15 run PureOS–a GNU/Linux distribution that puts privacy, security and freedom first, by design. It includes popular privacy-respecting software such as PureBrowser. The OS helps you “Surf the web safely without being tracked by advertisers or marketers” and allows you to easily encrypt your entire OS and data with your own encryption keys. This is huge, especially if you understand how much of your “private” data is actually being shared.

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PCLinuxOS 2019.09 updated installation media release

Filed under
GNU
Linux
PCLOS

The KDE versions both full and the minimalistic Darkstar contain kernel 5.2.15 plus a fully updated KDE Plasma desktop. Plasma desktop 5.16.5, Plasma Applications 19.08.1 and Plasma Frameworks 5.62.

The Mate Desktop was refreshed with kernel 5.2.15 and the applications and libraries were updated to their most recent stable versions from the previous release.

The Xfce Desktop was tweaked and now uses the Whisker menu by default. A login sound was added and the applications were updated along with some minor bug fixes.

In addition all ISOs now include the Nvidia 430.50 driver and will be used instead of the nouveau driver if your video card supports it. Hardware detection scripts were updated to provide better support for video cards that can use the Nvidia 430.50 driver. Pulseaudio has been updated to the stable 13.0 release. The Simple Update Notifier was reworked and now works for keeping you notified of system updates and the ability to update from the applet using apt-get. Small improvements were made to the Live media boot scripts. Vbox test media is also included on the installation media. This program allows you to quickly test an ISO on the fly or usbstick with various options without having to create a permanent VM in Virtualbox. Requires a valid Virtualbox installation. Thanks to the people involved for their contributions to this program.

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OSGeoLive 13.0 Released, which Brings Some New Applications

Filed under
OS
GNU
Linux

Astrid Emde has announced the new release of OSGeoLive 13.0 on Sep 12, 2019.

This release has improved the Python experience a lot by adding an additional Python modules like Fiona, rasterio, cartopy, pandas, geopandas, mappyfile.

Also, added the following new applications MapCache, GeoExt, t-rex, actinia.

Many packages have been updated to the latest version.

[...]

It is featuring a large collection of open-source geospatial software and free world maps.

It provides bootable ISO-Images and Virtual Machines which allow users to try out fully-operational versions of popular Free Geospatial Software without the need to install a thing.

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GNU community announces ‘Parallel GCC’ for parallelism in real-world compilers

Filed under
Development
GNU

Yesterday, the team behind the GNU project announced Parallel GCC, a research project aiming to parallelize a real-world compiler. Parallel GCC can be used in machines with many cores where GNU cannot provide enough parallelism. A parallel GCC can be also used to design a parallel compiler from scratch.

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Getting GNOME 3.34 on Various GNU/Linux Distros

Filed under
GNU
Linux
GNOME

I like to list out popular GNU/Linux distros that already ship latest desktop environment. For GNOME 3.34 case, currently I found Desktop Live distros that include it built-in to be Ubuntu, Fedora, openSUSE. You can download them and immediately test GNOME. Other names worth mentioning but I don't present them here are Alpine GNU/Linux, Debian, and Mageia. I write this at 17 September so things might change by day later. By this article, I also want to introduce several special distros like GNOME:Next and a certain awesome community service like Repology for you. Enjoy GNOME 3.34!

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Also: GNOME 3.34: Between Fedora Rawhide and openSUSE GNOME:Next

Funtoo Linux 1.4 Released

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gentoo

Drobbins has announced the new release of Funtoo Linux 1.4 on Sep 11, 2019.

This release is based on a 21 June 2019 snapshot of Gentoo Linux with significant updates to key parts of the system, such as compiler and OpenGL subsystem.

This is the fourth release of the Funtoo Linux 1.x series, which may be the last update of this release, as the developer said he would start developing 2.0 a month later.

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More in Tux Machines

Audiocasts/Shows: FLOSS Weekly, Python Shows and Noodlings

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  • Talk Python to Me: #230 Python in digital humanities research

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  • Cultivating The Python Community In Argentina

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  • Episode #148: The ASGI revolution is upon us!
  • Noodlings | Commander X16, BDLL and openSUSE News

    The mission of the computer. Similar to the Commodore 64 but made with off the shelf components. As far as the architecture goes, it is actually closer to the VIC-20 on board design but far, far more capable. I am rarely excited about new things, I like my old computers and really existing technology. I tend to drag my heels at the very thought of getting something new. This, for whatever reason gets me excited and I can’t exactly put my finger on it. This all started out as a kind of pondering in 2018 and in February 2019 with a video from David Murray, the 8-bit Guy’s Dream Computer. the discussion started by the 8-bit Guy The initial design started with the Gameduino for the video chip which had some technical hurdles and was based on an obsolete, as in, no longer supported, chip that doesn’t have a large pool of developers and hackers working on it. After some discussions and planning, it was decided to base it largely off of the VIC-20 as most of the chips are still available today and it is a known working design. Some of the changes would be a faster processor, better video and better sound components.

Mozilla: The Rust Programming Language and Firefox Releases

  • The Rust Programming Language Blog: Upcoming docs.rs changes

    On September 30th breaking changes will be deployed to the docs.rs build environment. docs.rs is a free service building and hosting documentation for all the crates published on crates.io. It's open source, maintained by the Rustdoc team and operated by the Infrastructure team.

  • Flatulence, Crystals, and Happy Little Accidents

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  • You'll get a new Firefox each month in 2020 as Mozilla speeds up releases

    Mozilla will turn the Firefox crank faster in 2020, releasing a new version of its web browser every four weeks instead of every six. If you're using the browser, the change should deliver new features to you faster since there will be less waiting between when developers build them and when they arrive. "In recent quarters, we've had many requests to take features to market sooner. Feature teams are increasingly working in sprints that align better with shorter release cycles. Considering these factors, it is time we changed our release cadence," Firefox team members Ritu Kothari and Yan Or said in a blog post Tuesday. "Shorter release cycles provide greater flexibility to support product planning and priority changes due to business or market requirements."

GNU lightning 2.1.3 released!

GNU lightning is a library to aid in making portable programs 
that compile assembly code at run time. 
Development: 
http://git.savannah.gnu.org/cgit/lightning.git 
Download release: 
ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/lightning/lightning-2.1.3.tar.gz 
  2.1.3 main features are the new RISC-V port, currently supporting 
only Linux 64 bit, and a major rewrite of the register live and 
unknown state logic, so that a long standing issue with a live 
register not accessed for several consecutive blocks could be 
incorrectly assumed dead. 
The matrix of built and tested environments is: 
aarch64	 Linux (Linaro, Foundation_v8pkg) 
alpha	 Linux (QEMU) 
armv7l	 Linux (QEMU) 
armv7hl	 Linux (QEMU) 
hppa	 Linux (32 bit, QEMU) 
i686	 Linux and Cygwin 
ia64	 Linux 
mips	 Linux (32 bit) 
powerpc32	Linux 
powerpc64	Linux and AIX 
powerpc64le	Linux 
riscv	 Linux (64 bit, QEMU) 
s390	 Linux (Hercules) 
s390x	 Linux (Hercules) 
sparc	 Linux (QEMU) 
sparc64	 Linux (QEMU) 
x32	 Linux (QEMU) 
x86_64	 Linux and Cygwin 

Read more

Programming: Python and C++

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  • How to Convert a Python String to int

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