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GNU

On GNU GIMP and GCC

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GNU
  • GIMP is a free, open source and powerful image editing software

    GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program) is undoubtedly the most popular free image editing software, and some even call it as the free Photoshop Alternative. If you are looking for a free tool that can let you edit your Photoshop files and offers a rich experience, GIMP is the right choice. This raster graphics editor comes with a lot of powerful features and enjoys support from an ever-growing open source community. Learning it, however, will take some time.

    GIMP was originally designed for Linux systems, but that does not mean Windows support is loose. It has been beautifully ported to Windows and runs as smooth as it does on Linux. I have very less experience in image editing, but I have seen this tool being used by a number of Photographers, Graphic Designers and people in the imaging industry. It is good to go for free alternatives to expensive tools like Photoshop.

  • Ampere eMAG Tuning For The GCC Compiler

    A revised patch was posted on Tuesday for adding ARMv8 tuning support for Ampere Computing's eMAG platform.

    Ampere eMAG is the very compelling ARM 64-bit server platform we began benchmarking last month. With up to 3A revised patch was posted on Tuesday for adding ARMv8 tuning support for Ampere Computing's eMAG platform.

    Ampere eMAG is the very compelling ARM 64-bit server platform we began benchmarking last month. With up to 32 cores and up to 3.3GHz turbo clock frequencies, it's quite a speedy ARM server platform. But with some GCC tuning can perhaps be even more competitive.

    The patch adds the "emag" target for tuning and adds its tuning values to the table. 2 cores and up to 3.3GHz turbo clock frequencies, it's quite a speedy ARM server platform. But with some GCC tuning can perhaps be even more competitive.

    The patch adds the "emag" target for tuning and adds its tuning values to the table.

Travel Laptop Tips in Practice

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GNU
Linux
Security

As I've mentioned in previous articles, I recommend buying a cheap, used computer for travel. That way, if you lose it or it gets damaged, confiscated or stolen, you're not out much money. I personally bought a used Acer Parrot C710 for use as a travel computer, because it's small, cheap and runs QubesOS pretty well once you give it enough RAM.

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System76: Why a computer maker moved manufacturing to Denver, despite ongoing trade war with China

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

Inside the spacious warehouse where solar-energy equipment was once made, about two dozen employees are building the craziest thing to be built in Denver: computers.

Major PC makers moved manufacturing overseas long ago, but System76 isn’t known for following others. Its computers don’t have Microsoft Windows, but rather, the open source Linux operating system. The bootstrapped company never took a dime in venture capital and instead let sales beget growth. And CEO Carl Richell says the time was right to move manufacturing to Denver, a decision that had more to do with customization and speed than rising costs in China or the ongoing trade war.

“We think we can manufacture our own products, and we think we can do it at a volume and price that is competitive, and do it locally,” said Richell, who co-founded System76 in his basement 18 years ago.

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Chrome OS Linux apps to gain access to Android ‘Play files’ folder

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GNU
Linux
Google

Chrome OS is rapidly becoming a serious player iChrome OS is rapidly becoming a serious player in the Linux field. Now, Google seems to be further integrating the Linux app support with the existing Android app support by allowing the Chrome OS Linux apps to access files from the separated ‘Play files’.

To keep things naturally secure, among other reasons, Chrome OS keeps its native files, the ‘Play files’ used by Android apps, and the ‘Linux files’ available to Linux apps neatly separated. If you wish to work on something with an Android app then switch to working on it from a Linux app, you currently need to copy the file from one container to the other.

Google’s Chromium team is working to allow users to break down that barrier, according to a work-in-progress commit posted last week to the Chromium Gerrit source code management. The goal of the work is to allow users to share contents of the ‘Play files’ folder with Linux apps, just as can currently be done with the Downloads folder.

The commit is under heavy discussion though, as the Chromium developers work on ensuring the safety and stability of such a change. For example, one factor considered is the possibility of a malicious file created from a Linux app potentially causing a more serious exploit via Android.n the Linux field. Now, Google seems to be further integrating the Linux app support with the existing Android app support by allowing the Chrome OS Linux apps to access files from the separated ‘Play files’.

To keep things naturally secure, among other reasons, Chrome OS keeps its native files, the ‘Play files’ used by Android apps, and the ‘Linux files’ available to Linux apps neatly separated. If you wish to work on something with an Android app then switch to working on it from a Linux app, you currently need to copy the file from one container to the other.

Google’s Chromium team is working to allow users to break down that barrier, according to a work-in-progress commit posted last week to the Chromium Gerrit source code management. The goal of the work is to allow users to share contents of the ‘Play files’ folder with Linux apps, just as can currently be done with the Downloads folder.

The commit is under heavy discussion though, as the Chromium developers work on ensuring the safety and stability of such a change. For example, one factor considered is the possibility of a malicious file created from a Linux app potentially causing a more serious exploit via Android.

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Also: Dutch audit finds Microsoft Office leaks confidential data

Pinebook: My First Few Surprising Hours With A $99 Linux Laptop

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GNU
Linux
Hardware
Reviews

The Pinebook is available in both 11.6" and 14" models for $99 (the 14" model has a lower resolution screen at time of publication, although mine had a "surprise" upgrade to 1080p before it was advertised on the site), and it's being offered in "Buy To Order" format. That basically means you buy it, they build them in small batches, then periodically ship them out from China.

Let's set expectations early. The Pinebook is built around a 64-Bit Quad-Core ARM Cortex A53 CPU clocked at 1.2GHz, with 2GB of LPDDR3 RAM. That's the same board Pine64 sells for $29.99. To arrive at $99 on my model, the Pinebook surrounds that board with a white clamshell-style enclosure, 16GB of eMMC flash storage, Wifi 802.11b/g/n, Bluetooth 4.0, a full-size keyboard, multi-touch touchpad, an SD webcam and a 1080p IPS display.

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Linuxbrew – The Homebrew Package Manager for Linux

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GNU
Linux

Linuxbrew is a clone of homebrew, the MacOS package manager, for Linux, which allows users to install software to their home directory.

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8 Best Cryptocurrency Mining Tools for Linux

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GNU
Linux
Software

Cryptocurrencies are any digital assets designed to be mediums of exchange implementing strong cryptographic practices.

Bitcoin is the most popular cryptocurrency and ever since its release in 2009, enthusiasts have created 4,000+ alternative variants of bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies.

Cryptomining involves verifying and adding crypto transactions to the blockchain digital ledger and we have compiled a list of the best 8 apps you can use for the task.

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10 ways to give thanks to open source and free software maintainers

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GNU
OSS

Every day, I use high-quality software that is developed and maintained by people who do not ask for payment, who respect my freedoms, and who are generous with their time and energy.

In this season of giving thanks, I encourage those of you who also use and appreciate the work of open source and free software maintainers to express your gratitude. Here are ten ways to do that...

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​Dell XPS 13: The best Linux laptop of 2018

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

Usually, when I get review hardware in, it's not a big deal. It's like working in a candy shop. At first, it seems great ("All the candy I can eat!"). Then, you quickly get sick of dealing with the extra equipment.

But, every now and again, I get a really fine machine, like Dell's latest XPS 13 Developer Edition laptop. And I get excited again.

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Linux To Start Alternative To glibc?

Filed under
Development
GNU
Linux

The world of open source software, and Linux/GNU in particular, is a strange one, governed by internal politics and beliefs. Now frustration seems to have the better of the Linux developers who are now considering creating their own Linux call library.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Networking Improvements To Mitigate Retpoline Overhead Ready For 4.21 Kernel

The recently talked about work to improve/restore Linux networking performance around Retpolines is queued now in net-next for the upcoming Linux 4.21 kernel cycle. This patch series for the Linux kernel's networking subsystem is about mitigating the Retpoline overhead introduced at the start of the year in order to address the Meltdown CPU security issue. Read more

Linux 4.20--rc76

Well, that's more like it. This is a *tiny* rc7, just how I like it. Maybe it's because everybody is too busy prepping for the holidays, and maybe it's because we simply are doing well. Regardless, it's been a quiet week, and I hope the trend continues. The patch looks pretty small too, although it's skewed by a couple of bigger fixes (re-apply i915 workarounds after reset, and dm zoned bio completion fix). Other than that it's mainly all pretty small, and spread out (usual bulk of drivers, but some arch updates, filesystem fixes, core fixes, test updates..) Read more Also: Linux 4.20-rc7 Kernel Released - Linux 4.20 Should Be Released In Time For Christmas

Android Leftovers

1080p Linux Gaming Performance - NVIDIA 415.22 vs. Mesa 19.0-devel RADV/RadeonSI

Stemming from the recent Radeon RX 590 Linux gaming benchmarks were some requests to see more 1080p gaming benchmarks, so here's that article with the low to medium tier graphics cards from the NVIDIA GeForce and AMD Radeon line-up while using the latest graphics drivers on Ubuntu 18.10. This round of benchmarking was done with the GeForce GTX 980, GTX 1060, GTX 1070, and GTX 1070 Ti using the newest 415.22 proprietary graphics driver. On the AMD side was using the patched Linux 4.20 kernel build (for RX 590 support) paired with Mesa 19.0-devel via the Padoka PPA while testing the Radeon RX 580 and RX 590. Read more