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Developer Endorses Dell For Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Fwupd Updated With New Support, Developer Endorses Dell For Linux

    Longtime GNOME developer Richard Hughes has announced a new release of fwupd, the open-source utility for updating firmware on Linux in a safe, automatic, and reliable manner.

    Fwupd continues advancing for making it much easier to upgrade firmware for many systems from the Linux desktop. Fwupd supports UEFI capsule updates and other interfaces while for end-users it can be run from the command-line or via front-ends like with GNOME Software integration. With today's first new release on their fwupd-0.8 branch, there are not only fixes but also new features.

  • New fwupd release, and why you should buy a Dell

Which Linux Operating Systems We Use and Why

Filed under
GNU
Linux

We really want you to start using Linux. But as there are so many Linux operating systems to choose from, some of which we’ve featured here, it can be tricky to decide which one to get started with.

Which is most productive? What about games? Should you choose a Linux distro that focuses on media production? What about programming? Or is there one that covers all bases?

In the end, it comes down to personal preference, but if you’re looking for a recommendation, the MakeUseOf Linux contributors all run Linux either as their main OS or as a dual-boot alternative. While we already have a list of the top Linux distros, here you can see which Linux operating systems we’re actually using in 2017.

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Parsix GNU/Linux 8.15 and 8.10 Get Linux Kernel 4.4.47 LTS, New Security Updates

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GNU
Linux

It's been a month since we've told you about the newest security updates that landed in the stable software repositories of the Debian-based Parsix GNU/Linux operating system, and it's time to keep you guys up to date with what's going on.

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FSF/GNU

Filed under
GNU
  • RISC-V Port Lands In GCC 7 Codebase

    Last month the RISC-V GCC port was approved for landing in GCC 7 while today that merge finally happened.

    The RISC-V GCC port has been a work in progress for a long time and was held up by university lawyers while that was all cleared up, the code went through a few rounds of code revisions, and the steering committee approved landing RISC-V support even as the codebase has moved onto only bug/regression fixes. Today all of that code finally was merged into the GCC7 code-base.

  • GNU's ddrescue For Disk Recovery Updated With New Options

    GNU ddrescue continues work on being a capable data recovery tool for copying data from a file or block device to another, doing more than just the dd command. GNU ddrescue 1.22 was released over the weekend as the newest version of this tool.

  • ZeroStack’s plans for self-driving in the cloud, Loom Systems’ analytics platform, and GNU C Library releases version 2.25—SD Times news digest: Feb. 6, 2017

    GNU C Library v2.25 available

    The GNU C Library, which is the library in the GNU system and in the GNU/Linux systems, released version 2.25 yesterday.

    The library is primarily designed to be a portable and high-performance C library. The news that comes along with this release includes the “feature test macro __STDC_WANT_LIB_EXT2__, from ISO/IEC TR 24731-2:2010, is supported to enable declarations of functions from that TR. Note that not all functions from that TR are supported by the GNU C Library,” according to its release notes.

  • GNU C Library 2.25 released
  • Wilber week 2017: our report

    I’ll talk more on this later in a dedicated post, detailing what is there or not, and why, with feedback on the Flatpak project.
    Bottom line: GIMP will have an official Flatpak, at least starting GIMP 2.10!

Best Linux Distros for 2017

Filed under
GNU
Linux

What are the best Linux distros of 2017? That’s a big question as this new year gains speed. This article will present what I believe – based on various types of Linux users ¬– are arguably the best Linux distros for 2017.

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Parsix GNU/Linux 8.10 "Erik" Operating System to Reach End of Life on March 31

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GNU
Linux

The Parsix GNU/Linux development team announced today, February 6, 2017, that the Parsix GNU/Linux 8.10 "Erik" operating system will reach end of life on March 31, 2017.

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4MLinux 20.3 Operating System Ships with Linux Kernel 4.4.44 LTS, Security Fixes

Filed under
GNU
Linux

4MLinux developer Zbigniew Konojacki is informing Softpedia today about the immediate availability of the third point release of the 4MLinux 20.0 GNU/Linux distribution.

4MLinux 20.3 is the third point release to the 4MLinux 20.x stable series of the independently-developed Linux-based operating system, bringing some of the latest security updates and a new kernel, namely Linux kernel 4.4.44 LTS.

"This is a minor maintenance release in the 4MLinux STABLE channel. The release ships with the Linux kernel 4.4.44," said Zbigniew Konojacki in the release announcement for the 4MLinux 20.3 release.

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IPFire 2.19 to Bring Tor 0.2.9.9 and OpenSSL 1.0.2k with New Security Fixes

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

Michael Tremer announced the availability for public testing of the upcoming IPFire 2.19 Core Update 109 maintenance release of the open source Linux-based router and firewall distribution.

The most important change included in this update appears to be support for the unbound 1.6.0 recursive and caching DNS resolver in the built-in DNS proxy, which will re-activate QNAME hardening and minimisation below NX domains. The change should also make IPFire check if a router drops DNS responses that are longer than a specific threshold.

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GNU/FSF

Filed under
GNU
  • Licensing resource series: the FSF Compliance Lab Team

    This is the latest installment in the Free Software Foundation's (FSF) Licensing & Compliance Lab's series highlighting the FSF Compliance Lab Team.

    The FSF receives thousands of licensing questions a year from free software users and developers. The staff on the FSF Compliance Lab would not be able to handle all these requests on their own. That is why we are so grateful to our volunteers who assist us in our efforts. Volunteers are one of the most important resources an organization can muster.

  • GNU gcal 4.1 released
  • gperf 3.1 released
  • Twenty-two new GNU releases in January
  • libiconv 1.15 released
  • sed-4.4 released [stable]

    This is to announce sed-4.4, a stable release.

  • How the GNU coreutils are tested

    Detailed here are some of the tools and techniques we use to test the GNU coreutils project, which should present some useful ways to automate the use of tools like gdb, strace, valgrind, sed, grep, or the coreutils themselves etc., either for testing or for other applications. We also describe general techniques like using timeouts in a robust and performant way.

Arch Linux vs. Solus vs. openSUSE Tumbleweed: Your Favorite Rolling Distro Is?

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I recently had to reinstall my laptop, and, since I only use Linux on my laptop, I could not afford to spend half a day customizing the operating system, install hundreds of updates, and set up my favorite apps.

I usually go with Arch Linux, but because installing it is not the easiest of tasks and I have to spend a lot of time making it the way I like, such as installing my favorite desktop environment, enabling AUR (Arch User Repository), installing various apps I need for work and everything else I do on my laptop, I decided to use a different distro.

Of course, I could always go with an Arch Linux-based distro, such as Antergos, Manjaro, or Chakra GNU/Linux, but I'm not a fan of distributions based on another, not to mention that many of them are build around a certain desktop environment and I don't like mixing packages and end up with a bloated system.

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Security News

  • Windows 10 least secure of Windows versions: study
    Windows 10 was the least secure of of current Windows versions in 2016, with 46% more vulnerabilities than either Windows 8 or 8.1, according to an analysis of Microsoft's own security bulletins in 2016. Security firm Avecto said its research, titled "2016 Microsoft Vulnerabilities Study: Mitigating risk by removing user privileges", had also found that a vast majority of vulnerabilities found in Microsoft products could be mitigated by removing admin rights. The research found that, despite its claims to being the "most secure" of Microsoft's operating systems, Windows 10 had 395 vulnerabilities in 2016, while Windows 8 and 8.1 each had 265. The research also found that while 530 Microsoft vulnerabilities were reported — marginally up from the 524 reported in 2015 — and 189 given a critical rating, 94% could be mitigated by removing admin rights. This was up from 85% in 2015.
  • Windows 10 Creators Update can block Win32 apps if they’re not from the Store [Ed: By Microsoft Peter. People who put Vista 10 on a PC totally lose control of that PC; remember, the OS itself is malware, as per textbook definitions. With DRM and other antifeatures expect copyright enforcement on the desktop soon.]
    The latest Windows 10 Insider Preview build doesn't add much in the way of features—it's mostly just bug fixes—but one small new feature has been spotted, and it could be contentious. Vitor Mikaelson noticed that the latest build lets you restrict the installation of applications built using the Win32 API.
  • Router assimilated into the Borg, sends 3TB in 24 hours
    "Well, f**k." Harsh language was appropriate under the circumstances. My router had just been hacked. Setting up a reliable home network has always been a challenge for me. I live in a cramped three-story house, and I don't like running cables. So my router's position is determined by the fiber modem in a corner on the bottom floor. Not long after we moved in, I realized that our old Airport Extreme was not delivering much signal to the attic, where two game-obsessed occupants fought for bandwidth. I tried all sorts of things. I extended the network. I used Ethernet-over-powerline connectors to deliver network access. I made a mystic circle and danced naked under the full moon. We lost neighbors, but we didn't gain a signal.
  • Purism's Librem 13 Coreboot Port Now "100%" Complete
    According to Purism's Youness Alaoui, their Coreboot port to the Librem 13 v1 laptop is now considered complete. The Librem 13 was long talked about having Coreboot over a proprietary BIOS while the initial models still had shipped with the conventional BIOS. Finally in 2017, they have now Coreboot at what they consider to be 100% complete for this Linux-friendly laptop.
  • The Librem 13 v1 coreboot port is now complete
    Here are the news you’ve been waiting for: the coreboot port for the Librem 13 v1 is 100% done! I fixed all of the remaining issues, it is now fully working and is stable, ready for others to enjoy. I fixed the instability problem with the M.2 SATA port, finished running all the tests to ensure coreboot is working correctly, fixed the headphone jack that was not working, made the boot prettier, and started investigating the Intel Management Engine issue.
  • Linux Update Fixes 11-Year-Old Flaw
    Andrey Konovalov, a security researcher at Google, found a use-after-free hole within Linux, CSO Online reported. This particular flaw is of interest because it appears to be situational. It only showed up in kernels built with a certain configuration option — CONFIG_IP_DCCP — enabled.

Kerala saves Rs 300 cr as schools switch to open software

The Kerala government has made a saving of Rs 300 crore through introduction and adoption of Free & Open Source Software (FOSS) in the school education sector, said a state government official on Sunday. IT became a compulsory subject in Kerala schools from 2003, but it was in 2005 only that FOSS was introduced in a phased manner and started to replace proprietary software. The decision made by the curriculum committee to implement it in the higher secondary sector has also been completed now. Read more

Tired of Windows and MAC computer systems? Linux may now be ready for prime time

Are you a bit tired of the same old options of salt and pepper, meaning having to choose only between the venerable Windows and MAC computer operating systems? Looking to branch out a bit, maybe take a walk on the wild side, learn some new things and save money? If so, the Linux operating system, which has been around for a long time and is used and loved by many hard-core techies and developers, may now be ready for prime time with the masses. Read more

Braswell based Pico-ITX SBC offers multiple expansion options

Axiomtek’s PICO300 is a Pico-ITX SBC with Intel Braswell, SATA-600, extended temperature support, and both a mini-PCIe and homegrown expansion connector. Axiomtek has launched a variation on its recently announced Intel Apollo Lake based PICO312 SBC that switches to the older Intel Braswell generation and offers a slightly reduced feature set. The board layout has also changed somewhat, with LVDS, SATA, and USB ports all changing location. Read more