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Bison 3.3 released

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GNU

We are very happy to announce the release of Bison 3.3!

The new option --update replaces deprecated features with their modern spelling, but also applies fixes such as eliminating duplicate directives, etc. It is now possible to annotate rules with their number of expected conflicts. Bison can be made relocatable. The symbol declaration syntax was overhauled, and in particular, %nterm, that exists since the origins of Bison, is now an officially supported (and documented!) feature. C++ parsers now feature genuine symbol constructors, and use noexcept constexpr. The GLR parsers in C++ now support the syntax_error exceptions. There are also many smaller improvements, including a fix for a bug which is at least 31 years old.

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Release LXQt 0.14.0

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The LXQt team is proud to announce the release of LXQt 0.14.0, the Lightweight Qt Desktop Environment.

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Also: LXQt 0.14 Brings File Manager Additions, Desktop Icon Improvements

Open Outlook: Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Red Hat

2018 proved one thing to me: Choice is everywhere. It’s evident in the workloads that organizations run, in how they run them and in where these applications ultimately live. New enterprise applications continue to emerge, highlighted by the interest being shown in blockchain, IoT and AI, with these applications running across bare metal servers, virtual machines and Linux containers hosted on private and multiple public cloud footprints. I find this constant evolution incredibly exciting and one of the reasons why I love working in IT.

But in such a world of change, organizations need a constant, something that they can rely upon to help both consume this innovation and preserve their right to change technology directions as new options arise. The one common factor that underpins all of these options is that the majority of these next-generation applications are written on:

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Flatpaks for PureOS Store for Librem 5 Phone and Laptops

Filed under
GNU
Linux

GNU/Linux Salaries Go up While Microsoft Goes Down (Downtimes)

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Dumping Vista 10 and Encountering UEFI Barriers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Windows 10 alternatives: Best free, open source operating systems

    So why not opt for a free, open source Windows 10 alternative?

    Switching to an open source OS could involve a learning curve, but the community, customisation and lack of cost should be enough to make up for it.

    Read on for our favourite free, open source browsers.

  • Challenge Accepted: An Adventure in Linux — Part 1

    So, I went over to Distro Chooser and answered a few questions, picked a distro I had not used before, and created a bootable USB. The problem was when I tried to get my laptop to boot from the live USB, it wouldn’t. Enter issue number one: UEFI. For those who may not know, UEFI stands for “unified extensible firmware interface” and has replaced the basic BIOS firmware I was familiar with. Due to the new laptop having UEFI, there were some compatibility issues with the distro I had chosen. My options were to configure the laptop for a legacy boot or attempt to find a new distro I could use with UEFI.

MythTV 30.0

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Movies
  • v30.0 Released

    The MythTV Team is pleased to announce the release of MythTV version v30.0

    This release is the first release of the new stable branch fixes/30.

  • MythTV 30.0 Released With Front-End Support For Select Android TV Devices

    It's been a while since last having anything major to report on MythTV, the once very common HTPC software for open-source DVR/PVR needs albeit less so these days given all the Internet streaming and on-demand video platforms. This month the project released MythTV 30.0 as their newest feature release.

  • MythTV 30.0 released

    The MythTV Team has announced the release of MythTV 30.0. The release notes contain more information.

Free software made it on laptops but IoT future is bleak

Filed under
GNU

The biggest problem facing people interested in free and open source software is the lack of alternative firmware for IoT devices, president of the Software Freedom Conservancy Bradley Kuhn told Linux.conf.au in Christchurch on Friday.

"So many devices now are digital, and so many devices now run Linux, so many devices now threaten our privacy, security, our very existence," Kuhn said.

"And we need the source code for them to be able to solve all those problems -- we don't just need the source code, we need the ability to effectively use the source code, to recompile it, and install it."

According to Kuhn, having the ability to tinker and replace the OS of devices is what made free software great in the first place, and the way to get people involved in a movement that could come to be dominated by large business-focused contributors.

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Also: Licensing and Compliance Lab: The most frequently asked Frequently Asked Questions

GNU/Linux Desktop/Laptop: Dell and Chromebooks

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • New Dell XPS 13 Developer Edition Goes on Sale Powered by Ubuntu

    A new version of the popular Dell XPS 13 developer edition laptop has gone on sale — and it’s powered by Ubuntu, naturally.

    The updated Dell XPS 13 developer edition is available to buy in the US, Europe, and Canada, with prices starting at $740.

    The newly refreshed notebook is the direct successor to the Dell XPS 13 developer edition (9370) launched back in January 2018 (to much praise and plenty of envy).

    “Last January the Dell XPS 13 developer edition (9370) made its debut Today we’re excited to announce that one year later its successor, the XPS 13 developer edition (9380), is now available in the US, Canada, and Europe,” Barton George, head of Project Sputnik at Dell, says in his announcement.

  • Dell launches new Ubuntu-based XPS 13 9380 Developer Edition range

    Dell has officially launched the Ubuntu-based XPS 13 9380 Developer Edition range, with four base configurations for fans of Project Sputnik to choose from. Along with the Ubuntu Linux 18.04 operating system, potential buyers can choose from an i3-8145U model with 4 GB RAM, 128 GB SSD and non-touch FHD screen all the way up to a variant that sports an i7-8565U CPU, 16 GB RAM, 256 GB SSD and a touch 4K Ultra HD panel.

  • Audio support for Linux on Chromebooks appears to be pushed back to Chrome OS 74

    There was some good progress on adding basic audio playback in the Linux container of a Chromebook this month and I had high hopes we’d see the feature soon. Unfortunately, it looks like this functionality has been pushed from version 73 of Chrome OS to version 74.

Woof – Easily Exchange Files Over a Local Network in Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

Woof (short for Web Offer One File) is a simple application for sharing files between hosts on a small local network. It consists of a tiny HTTP server that can serve a specified file for a given number of times (default is once) and then terminates.

To use woof, simply invoke it on a single file, and the recipient can access your shared file via a web browser or using a command-line web-client such as cURL, HTTPie, wget or kurly (a curl alternative) from the terminal.

One advantage of woof over other file sharing tools is that it shares files between a different operating system, or different devices (computers, smartphones, tablets etc.), provided the recipient has a web browser installed.

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More in Tux Machines

Essential System Tools: QDirStat – Excellent Qt-based directory statistics

This is the latest in our series of articles highlighting essential system tools. These are small, indispensable utilities, useful for system administrators as well as regular users of Linux based systems. The series examines both graphical and text based open source utilities. For this article, we’ll look at QDirStat, a graphical application to show what’s devouring your disk space and help you tidy up the disorder. For details of all tools in this series, please check the table at the summary page of this article. QDirStat is a continuation of the KDirStat utility. QDirStat is based on the latest Qt 5, and doesn’t need any KDE libraries or infrastructure. If you come from a Windows background you’ve probably tried WinDirStat, a Windows port of KDirStat, the predecessor of QDirStat. Read more

KDE is adding Matrix to its instant messaging infrastructure

KDE has been looking for a better way of chatting and live-sharing information for several years now. IRC has been a good solution for a long time, but it has centralized servers KDE cannot control. It is also insecure and lacks features users have come to expect from more modern IM services. Other alternatives, such as Telegram, Slack and Discord, although feature-rich, are centralized and built around closed-source technologies and offer even less control than IRC. This flies in the face of KDE's principles that require we use and support technologies based on Free software. However, our search for a better solution has finally come to an end: as of today we are officially using Matrix for collaboration within KDE! Matrix is an open protocol and network for decentralised communication, backed by an open standard and open source reference implementations for servers, clients, client SDKs, bridges, bots and more. It provides all the features you’d expect from a modern chat system: infinite scrollback, file transfer, typing notifications, read receipts, presence, search, push notifications, stickers, VoIP calling and conferencing, etc. It even provides end-to-end encryption (based on Signal’s double ratchet algorithm) for when you want some privacy. Read more Also: KDE To Support Matrix Decentralized Instant Messaging

Android Leftovers

Canonical Is Planning Some Awesome New Content For The Snap Store

There I was, thoughtfully drafting an article titled "3 Things Canonical Can Do To Improve The Snap Ecosystem," when I jumped on the phone with Evan Dandrea, an Engineering Manager who just so happens to be responsible for the Snapcraft ecosystem at Canonical. As it turns out, that headline will need a slight edit. One less number. That's because I've just learned Canonical has some ambitious plans for the future of the Snap Store. Read more