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NuTyX 9.0 available with cards 2.2

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The NuTyX team is please to annonce the 9.0 release of NuTyX.

NuTyX 9.0 comes with kernel 4.10.8, kernel lts 4.9.20, glibc 2.25, gcc 6.3.0, binutils 2.28, python 3.6.0, xorg-server 1.19.2, qt 5.8.0, plasma 5.9.4, kf5 5.31.0, gnome 3.22.2, mate 1.16.1, xfce4 4.12.3, firefox 52.0.2, etc....

More then 2500 commits since the 8.2 version.

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Polychromatic, the Razer Config App for Linux, Scores a New Update

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GNU
Linux
  • Polychromatic, the Razer Config App for Linux, Scores a New Update

    Polychromatic, an unofficial desktop app that lets Razer mouse and keyboard users configure their devices on Linux, has received an update.

    Polychromatic v0.3.8 introduces a ‘completely overhauled‘ tray applet that is simpler to navigate and more useful at giving you at-a-glance information about your configured devices.

  • Polychromatic 0.3.8 Gives Greater Unofficial Love To Razer Devices On Linux

    While Razer is exploring better Linux support for its products and not just limited to laptops, for now they don't have any official Linux configuration software for their products. Fortunately, community solutions exist, including Polychromatic that's been one of the more popular Razer open-source configuration tools in recent times.

Chrome Adds Initial Support for Native Linux Desktop Notifications

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
  • Chrome Adds Initial Support for Native Linux Desktop Notifications

    Last month we told you that Google Chrome might start using native notifications on Linux — and now the first bit of code to enable this has landed.

    Which I guess turns that earlier “might” into a more certain “is”.

  • Chrome/Chromium Lands Initial Support For Native Linux Desktop Notifications

    Landing today within Git for Google's Chrome/Chromium web-browser is initial support for supporting native desktop notifications under Linux.

    Google developers have wired up initial support for native Linux desktop notifications. This native platform bridge for Linux will communicate notification changes to the desktop environment via the D-Bus notification specification.

Libreboot Reorganizes: Seeks to Make Amends

Filed under
GNU
Linux

It appears the people developing Libreboot have done some of the hard work necessary to fix potentially toxic personal dynamics after last year’s controversy, when the project removed itself from the FSF and GNU.

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Dell Launches World’s Most Powerful 15" and 17" Laptops Powered by Ubuntu Linux

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

After announcing earlier this year the release of the Dell Precision 5520 mobile workstation as the world’s thinnest and lightest 15” notebook powered by Ubuntu, Dell launches two new models for fans of the Linux-based operating system.

Originally scheduled to arrive during the month of March 2017, the Dell Precision 7520 and Dell Precision 7720 models are finally available for purchase, and Dell dubs them as the world’s most powerful 15-inch mobile workstations preloaded with the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system.

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New Black Lab Linux Weekly ISO Improves AMD Ryzen and Microsoft Surface Support

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Black Lab Software CEO Roberto J. Dohnert has informed Softpedia today, April 4, 2017, about the immediate availability of a new weekly ISO snapshot of the Black Lab Linux operating system.

Black Lab Linux Weekly 256 is out now, available for download from the official announcement, and it's the first to become the base for the next major release of the Ubuntu-based distro, namely Black Lab Linux 9, whose development cycle also starts today, along with the Feature Freeze stage.

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Arch Linux 2017.04.01 Now Available for Download, Powered by Linux Kernel 4.10.6

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GNU
Linux

The month of April kicks off with the release of a new ISO snapshot of the widely-used Arch Linux operating system, Arch Linux 2017.04.01, which brings the latest GNU/Linux technologies and Open Source applications.

Last month, when we reported on the release of the Arch Linux 2017.03.01 ISO snapshot, we told you that support for 32-bit installations was dropped from the official images of the independently developed GNU/Linux operating system, which slimmed down the images in size with a couple hundred MB.

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How to have a Linux home server on the cheap

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

Ask any Linux enthusiast, and they’ll tell you how awesome an operating system Linux can be. (Well, except Bryan Lunduke, who will say it sucks before he says it’s awesome.) For the desktop user, the freedom from worry about most viruses is a big plus, and not spending $100 upgrading Windows is a big plus too.

As awesome as Linux is for desktop use, Linux (and BSD for that matter) truly shines as a server. While providing web-based services is one of those server-y things Linux does really well, Linux can do a lot more than host a blog about family outings.

If you’re looking to host your own services instead of paying for or relying on those in the cloud, running your own home server is one of the best ways to keep your files private.

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Super Grub2 Disk

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Super Grub2 Disk is not a Linux distribution and, in fact, I do not think it entirely qualifies as an operating system. Yet, I believe Super Grub2 Disk (SGD) is one of the more useful projects I have encountered recently, especially for distro-hoppers such as myself. Almost everyone who tries out new operating systems, especially people who switch distributions a lot, has eventually run into a situation where installing a new operating system causes problems with their boot loader. Perhaps the new distribution does not properly detect the old one, excluding it from the boot menu, perhaps a new operating system takes over the system with its own boot loader, maybe we accidentally wipe out the directory where our boot loader was installed. Whatever the cause, installing a new operating system can leave many people in a situation where their system no longer boots properly.

SGD offers a solution for people who have (usually by accident) caused their boot loader to stop working or to no longer recognize their operating system. SGD basically acts like a portable copy of the GRUB boot loader which we can copy to a CD or USB thumb drive. When we encounter a system where the boot loader is not working, we can boot from the SGD media and ask it to detect all the operating systems on our computer. SGD scans our hard drive and presents us with a list of operating systems it has found and can boot. Then we can simply select the operating system we want to load. The operating system boots, just as it normally would, and we can then get work done or go about repairing the damage to our system.

All of this may seem a little abstract so I will walk through an example, recreating a situation I read about recently on a support forum. Someone had been cleaning up files on their hard drive and accidentally deleted their /boot/grub directory. This is the directory which stores the boot loader and its settings; without the files in /boot/grub the operating system will not boot.

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME News

  • GNOME's JavaScript Component Will Be Seeing More Improvements For 3.26
    GJS -- the GNOME JavaScript system that allows for GObject introspection and other capabilities via JavaScript on the desktop -- is planning for further improvements with GNOME 3.26.
  • Show desktop icon in Gnome 3 - Where and how
    Despite my recently found liking for Gnome 3, largely because of Fedora 24 and Fedora 25, plus some rigorous work with extensions like Dash to Dock, it is still a highly inefficient desktop environment. The unnecessary touch emphasis is there, regardless of what anyone says, and it makes things difficult. For instance, Show desktop. This is an action slash widget in pretty much every other desktop, and despite occasional setbacks and regressions, it's always been there, a loyal companion in the moment of need. Not so in Gnome 3. Not just hidden. Not there at all. And what if you want it? Far from trivial. Hence this tutorial.
  • There's a script that makes the GNOME launcher a bit more organised
    I follow a great many sources for news and one that popped up in my feed is the 'gnome-dash-fix' script. It sorts out the mess that is the GNOME application launcher.

Leftovers: KDE and Qt

  • KDE neon CMake Package Validation
    In KDE neon‘s constant quest of raising the quality bar of KDE software and neon itself, I added a new tool to our set of quality assurance tools. CMake Package QA is meant to ensure that find_package() calls on CMake packages provided by config files (e.g. FooConfig.cmake files) do actually work.
  • Aether Icon Theme
  • Krita 2017 Survey Results
    A bit later than planned, but here are the 2017 Krita Survey results! We wanted to know a lot of things, like, what kind of hardware and screen resolution are most common, what drawing tablets were most common, and which ones gave most trouble. We had more than 1000 responses! Here’s a short summary, for the full report, head to Krita User Survey Report.
  • Cutelyst 1.6.0 released, to infinity and beyond!
    Once 1.5.0 was release I thought the next release would be a small one, it started with a bunch of bug fixes, Simon Wilper made a contribution to Utils::Sql, basically when things get out to production you find bugs, so there were tons of fixes to WSGI module.
  • LaKademy 2017 just started!
    The Latin America KDE Summit, LaKademy, just started today in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil. The country is in the middle of a general strike, which I’m supporting, but the LaKademy couldn’t stop. We’ve been organizing this meeting for a year.
  • KDE Connect from the eyes of a newbie... What sorcery is this?
    Of course, I inferred it was something to connect a phone and a PC in some way and enabling the swapping of files in between the two devices, but I really did not care much about it. After all, that is what bluetooth is for, right? Today, I decided to give it a try on PCLOS.
  • 9 months of Atelier project, almost time to launch(or not) =D
  • Nextcloud Plugin for QuickShare
    So after a long hiatus I chose the Plasma QuickShare applet (which is sort of the Plasma5 replacement for the old Pastebin Plasmoid) as my point of re-entry into KDE code work. There was after all a deal of itches there I wanted scratched. It’s been quite a bit of fun figuring out the various interesting frameworks QuickShare is connected to at the backend. Anyways, some days ago I got a rudimentary Nextcloud plugin past review and pushed it, which should mean it’ll soon be coming to a 5.10-powered desktop near you :)
  • QNX as a desktop operating system
    On his spare time, Elad Lahav (a kernel developer at BlackBerry) built an experimental Qt-based desktop environment to try and see if he could use QNX as a desktop operating system. And it works!
  • Performance regression testing of Qt Quick
    We recently added a new toy to The Qt Project, and I wanted to give an overview on what it is and how it can be used.
  • Qt World Summit 2017 Call for Presentations
  • Give us a proper mimetype name for OpenCL C files!
    KDevelop, your cross-platform IDE, since version 5.1 has initial OpenCL language support.

Oh Snap – to boldly package where no one has packaged before

One of the great disadvantages of the Linux desktop is its software distribution mechanism. While the overall concept of central software repos works great and has been adapted into powerful Stores in commercial products, deploying and using programs, delivered as packages, is a tricky business. It stems from the wider fragmentation of the distro ecospace, and it essence, it means that if you want to release your product, you must compile it 150 odd ways, not just for different distributions but also for different versions of the same distribution. Naturally, this model scares away the big game. Recently though, there have been several attempts to make Linux packages more cross-distro and minimize the gap between distributions. The name of the game: Snap, and we’ve tasted this app-container framework before. It is unto Linux what, well, Windows stuff is unto Windows, in a way. Not quite statically compiled stuff, but definitely independent. I had it tested again in Ubuntu 17.04, and it would appear that Snap is getting more and more traction. Let’s have another look. Read more

Kubuntu 17.04 - the next generation

As usual, Kubuntu 17.04 does not give you any surprises. It is stable and reliable. It is reasonably resource-hungry. There are no wonders in this new release. Just a well-rounded distribution for everyday use. Yes, there are small bugs or inconveniences here and there, but they are not huge and can be easily fixed, replaced or lived with. The biggest of them for me, of course, is the lack of multimedia codecs. You can heal that easily. Read more