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GNU/Linux Desktop: Litebook, Razer, Ryzen, and Linux Club Guide

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GNU
Linux
  • Litebook Launches Cheap, Chromebook-Like Linux Laptop Powered by elementary OS

    Litebook, a small hardware manufacturer that we never heard of before, has recently released a new Linux-powered laptop that's cheap, slim, fast, elegant, light, and designed to rival Chromebooks.

    The Alpha Litebook is a 14.1-inch Full HD (1920x1080) laptop that runs the Ubuntu-based elementary OS distribution and ships with some of the most popular open source applications, including Google Chrome, Steam for Linux, Spotify, Skype, PlayOnLinux, WPS Office office suite, and much more.

  • Razer looking to improve Linux support on their 'Blade' series of laptops

    It seems Razer have been getting a lot of requests for Linux support on their 'Razer Blade' laptop line, so they are looking for feedback.

  • Running The Ryzen 7 1700 At 4.0GHz On Linux

    Many Phoronix readers appear rather intrigued by the AMD Ryzen 7 1700 on Linux as it offers good multi-threaded performance with eight cores / 16 threads and retails for just $329 USD. Making the Ryzen 7 1700 even more appealing to enthusiasts is that it overclocks well. For those curious, here are benchmarks of the Ryzen 7 1700 on Ubuntu Linux running at 4.0GHz.

  • The Linux Club Guide

    This guide tells some of our story, but mostly tries to give you ideas on how to make a Linux club work where you are.

Releases: Kwort and Trenta OS

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Kwort 4.3.2 is out

    Kwort 4.3.2 is available for download

  • [Trenta OS] March 2017 Update

    We would like to start this update by thanking our dedicated fans and community members who have shown us nothing but support over the 3 years that we have worked on Trenta OS and Trenta.io. Today we will make some possibly unpopular announcements. Our goal of providing you with the best looking open-source desktop experience has not changed. Though, we do need to make some critical changes at this time.

    [...]

    TL;DR: Trenta OS ISO release schedule has been put on hold. Rainier UI and Trenta OS testing packages will be installable on existing Ubuntu Gnome installations and possibly more distros for testing. There will be more community interaction.

Maui 17.03 – “Cuba Libre” released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The Maui Team is happy to announce the release of Maui 17.03 – Cuba Libre.

This release comes with plenty new package updates and KDE Plasma 5.9.3.
It also ships Frameworks 5.31, Qt 5.7.1 and LTS Linux Kernel 4.4.0~65.
Firefox was updated to version 51 and Thunderbird to version 45.

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Distros News

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD
  • Three Rescue Disks for Your Toolbox

    If you're a SysAdmin, or work anywhere on the Ops side of DevOps, a rescue disc should be an essential part of your arsenal. With a bootable rescue system, either on a CD or on a thumb drive, you can recover a password, detect and remove a rootkit or other malware, repair a Master Boot Record, retrieve data from a damaged drive and more.

    You can build your own, of course. All of the necessary tools are freely available under open source licenses and are included in the repositories of most Linux distributions. But the easier route is to use one of the Linux distributions designed specifically as a rescue disc, and which comes with all of the tools you might need already installed. There are many, but we'll look at three of the most popular. Each includes tools to fix problems on machines running either Linux or Windows.

  • The most awaited distribution in Q2 2017

    The second quarter of 2017 promises to be very interesting.

    Several distributions schedule their release between April and June 2017.

    Apart from two usual competitors that issue their new releases every 6 months, Ubuntu and Fedora, we will see Tails 3.0 and Linux Lite 3.4.

  • Packaging with CPack — on FreeBSD

    Some days of the week, I work on Free Software projects that aren’t ready to see the light yet; they live in my own git repo’s, or wherever. While I have the intention of publishing eventually, I usually want to get things somewhat working before throwing code out there.

    Part of checking if things work is packaging, and installing the stuff on more than one system. Sure, I can build everywhere, or copy around executables, but it struck me that it’d be cool to have packages — you know, installable with the system package manager — for the stuff I make. O yeah, I know flatpak is the new orange, but I’m not that hip. I’ll stick with Debian and FreeBSD packages, thanks.

Desktop GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • The Librem 13 v1: A full-fledged modern laptop with coreboot for freedom and privacy freaks

    Coreboot is a free and open source software. The project aimed at replacing the proprietary BIOS firmware and blobs. Unfortunately, Coreboot does not run on the modern laptop (except Chromebooks) due to Intel ME and other closed source technologies.

  • The Linux Migration: Other Users' Stories, Part 1

    Shortly after I announced my intention to migrate to Linux as my primary desktop OS, a number of other folks contacted me and said they had made the same choice or they had been encouraged by my decision to also try it themselves. It seems that there is a fair amount of pent-up interest—at least in the IT community—to embrace Linux as a primary desktop OS. Given the level of interest, I thought it might be helpful for readers to hear from others who are also switching to Linux as their primary desktop OS, and so this post kicks off a series of posts where I’ll share other users’ stories about their Linux migration.

    In this first post of the series, you’ll get a chance to hear from Roddy Strachan. I’ve structured the information in a “question-and-answer” format to make it a bit easier to follow.

  • Gnome Foundation executive director wants you to think beyond the desktop

    Neil McGovern was recently elected as the Executive Director of the Gnome Foundation, a position that was previously held by Karen Sandler.

    Prior to joining the Gnome Foundation, McGovern was working with Collabora Productivity, a UK-based company that offers enterprise solutions based on the fully open source LibreOffice project. He spent five years at Collabora before taking over the full-time role at the Gnome Foundation.

    As you may already know, Gnome is one of the major open source projects. It’s a desktop environment for Linux and BSD systems. The Gnome Foundation oversees the development of the project.

  • Free Software Foundation Europe: What Happened In Munich

    For those looking for some interesting weekend reading, the Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE) has provided a lengthy write-up about what happened in Munich with regards to LiMux and the possibility of abandoning their Linux/open-source efforts in favor of going back to Microsoft Windows.

    The Munich city council and mayor haven't totally reverted their mind yet, but they have postponed the final decision. FSFE says their new mandate buys them additional time to work to convince them to stay with Linux and free software.

4MLinux 21.0 STABLE released.

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The status of the 4MLinux 21.0 series has been changed to STABLE. Create your documents with LibreOffice 5.3.0.3 and GIMP 2.8.20, share them using DropBox 19.4.13, surf the Internet with Firefox 51.0.1 and Chromium 56.0.2924.76, stay in touch with your friends via Skype 4.3.0.37 and Thunderbird 45.7.1, enjoy your music collection with Audacious 3.8.2 and aTunes 3.1.2, watch your favorite videos with MPlayer SVN-r37889 and VLC 2.2.4, play games with Mesa 13.0.4/Wine 2.2 support enabled. You can also setup the 4MLinux LAMP Server (Linux 4.4.44, Apache 2.4.25, MariaDB 10.1.21, PHP 5.6.30 and PHP 7.0.15). Perl 5.24.0 and Python 2.7.12 are also available.

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An Interview with Michael Natterer, GIMP maintainer

Filed under
GNU
Software

GIMP is Free Software, but even before this, it is people: the ones who create it, the ones who create with it… We don’t have accurate statistics and we take pride on not gathering your data. Yet we know (through other websites that have logged partial statistics over the years) that this is a widely used piece of software, by millions of people around the world. So wouldn’t it be neat to meet some of the individuals who make this project come alive?

Some people think there’s a huge company behind GIMP. This is not the case. GIMP has always been developed by a handful of random people scattered around the world. Most of them are volunteers and none of them work on it full-time. As an insider myself, I’ve wanted to launch a series of interviews with the many awesome people I’ve met since I started contributing. So who better to start with than our own benevolent dictator, GIMP maintainer, and the biggest code contributor: Michael Natterer, aka “mitch”.

This interview was held on Friday, February 3, 2017 at around 3AM in front of a fireplace and after a day of hacking at Wilber Week. With us were several team members, including Michael Schumacher (schumaml (S)) and Øyvind Kolås (pippin (P)), who also asked questions.

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Kali Linux Review and Installation Guide with Screenshots

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GNU
Linux
HowTos

Kali Linux is an open source Debian based Linux distro that is specially design and built to enhance the penetration testing and security auditing methodologies. Being funded and maintained by Offensive Security, one of the leading company and the front-runners in the field of penetration testing and security services. Kali Linux is equipped with hundreds of tools to enable extensive development in information security services including Forensics, Reverse engineering, high-end security research and analysis and penetration testing. Backtrack the predecessor to Kali Linux had some major issues with the version updates as many believed that the system will break if the updates are made and that is the reason it was withdrawn and many more new feature and tools were added to release the most promising distro, Kali Linux.

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Also: Installation of Devuan Linux (Fork of Debian)

Chromebooks Are Spreading

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gentoo
Google
  • Best Chromebooks for business 2017: Should I buy a Chromebook? Chromebook buying advice

    Instead of running Microsoft Windows or Mac OS X, Chromebooks support Google's Chrome operating system (OS), meaning that these machines are entirely internet and cloud-based.

    Good for those familiar with the Chrome web browser and the Google productivity suite (Docs, Sheets, Slides), not so good for those wanting to perform heavy duty tasks with external applications.

    But keep an open mind, if you're looking for a cheap laptop to perform internet-based tasks, such as emails or web browsing, the Chromebook could be a viable option or a great option for a second machine.

    Read on to find out the best Chromebooks for business...

  • Apple’s Devices Lose Luster in American Classrooms

    Apple is losing its grip on American classrooms, which technology companies have long used to hook students on their brands for life.

    Over the last three years, Apple’s iPads and Mac notebooks — which accounted for about half of the mobile devices shipped to schools in the United States in 2013 — have steadily lost ground to Chromebooks, inexpensive laptops that run on Google’s Chrome operating system and are produced by Samsung, Acer and other computer makers.

  • Apple Losing Out to Microsoft and Google in U.S. Classrooms [iophk: "weird-ass spin there in the title. Apple is really losing to Google, Microsoft is treading water instead."]

    According to research company Futuresource Consulting, in 2016 the number of devices in American classrooms that run iOS and macOS fell to third place behind both Google-powered laptops and Windows devices.

Microsoft Versus GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • Europe-wide interest in Munich desktop debate

    In the days leading up to the vote, the city received a record-breaking number of comments, one city councillor noted. A handful of activists attended the city hall meeting, and an alliance of German and international free and open source organisations questioned the city's plans in an open letter.

    In a statement, the Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE) says that the door is still open, “although the mandate is highly suggestive, in that it suggests that the existing vendor-neutral approach is to be replaced with a proprietary solution.” The advocacy group says it will continue to campaign: “The vendor-neutral strategy must prevail.”

  • Microsoft open source efforts draw praise [Ed: This article is a lie, based on selective quotes. Microsoft is attacking FOSS using patents and recall what happens in Munich.]
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More in Tux Machines

Linux Devices, Tizen, and Android

Leftovers: OSS

  • SAP buys into blockchain, joins Hyperledger Project
  • foss-north speaker line-up
    I am extremely pleased to have confirmed the entire speaker line-up for foss north 2017. This will be a really good year!
  • Chromium/Chrome Browser Adds A glTF Parser
    Google's Chrome / Chromium web-browser has added a native glTF 1.0 parser. The GL Transmission Format, of course, being Khronos' "3D asset delivery format" for dealing with compressed scenes and assets by WebGL, OpenGL ES, and other APIs. There are glTF utility libraries in JavaScript and other web-focused languages, but Google adding a native glTF 1.0 parser appears to be related to their VR push with supporting VR content on the web. Their glTF parser was added to Chromium Git on Friday.
  • Sex and Gor and open source
    A few weeks ago, Dries Buytaert, founder of the popular open-source CMS Drupal, asked Larry Garfield, a prominent Drupal contributor and long-time member of the Drupal community, “to leave the Drupal project.” Why did he do this? He refuses to say. A huge furor has erupted in response — not least because the reason clearly has much to do with Garfield’s unconventional sex life. [...] I’ll unpack the first: open-source communities/projects are crucially important to many people’s careers and professional lives — cf “the cornerstone of my career” — so who they allow and deny membership to, and how their codes of conduct are constructed and followed, is highly consequential.
  • Hazelcast Releases 3.8 – The Fastest Open Source In-Memory Data Grid
  • SecureDrop and Alexandre Oliva are 2016 Free Software Awards winners
  • MRRF 17: Lulzbot and IC3D Release Line Of Open Source Filament
    Today at the Midwest RepRap Festival, Lulzbot and IC3D announced the creation of an Open Source filament. While the RepRap project is the best example we have for what can be done with Open Source hardware, the stuff that makes 3D printers work – filament, motors, and to some extent the electronics – are tied up in trade secrets and proprietary processes. As you would expect from most industrial processes, there is an art and a science to making filament and now these secrets will be revealed.
  • RApiDatetime 0.0.2

Security Leftovers

  • NSA: We Disclose 90% of the Flaws We Find
    In the wake of the release of thousands of documents describing CIA hacking tools and techniques earlier this month, there has been a renewed discussion in the security and government communities about whether government agencies should disclose any vulnerabilities they discover. While raw numbers on vulnerability discovery are hard to come by, the NSA, which does much of the country’s offensive security operations, discloses more than nine of every 10 flaws it finds, the agency’s deputy director said.
  • EFF Launches Community Security Training Series
    EFF is pleased to announce a series of community security trainings in partnership with the San Francisco Public Library. High-profile data breaches and hard-fought battles against unlawful mass surveillance programs underscore that the public needs practical information about online security. We know more about potential threats each day, but we also know that encryption works and can help thwart digital spying. Lack of knowledge about best practices puts individuals at risk, so EFF will bring lessons from its comprehensive Surveillance Self-Defense guide to the SFPL. [...] With the Surveillance Self-Defense project and these local events, EFF strives to help make information about online security accessible to beginners as well as seasoned techno-activists and journalists. We hope you will consider our tips on how to protect your digital privacy, but we also hope you will encourage those around you to learn more and make better choices with technology. After all, privacy is a team sport and everyone wins.
  • NextCloud, a security analysis
    First, I would like to scare everyone a little bit in order to have people appreciate the extent of this statement. As the figure that opens the post indicates, there are thousands of vulnerable Owncloud/NextCloud instances out there. It will surprise many just how easy is to detect those by trying out common URL paths during an IP sweep.
  • FedEx will deliver you $5.00 just to install Flash
    Bribes on offer as courier's custom printing service needs Adobe's security sinkhole

GNOME Extensions Website Has A New Look

Every GNOME Shell user will visit the official GNOME Shell Extensions website at least once. And if those users do so this weekend they’ll notice a small difference as the GNOME Shell Extensions website is sporting a minor redesign. This online repo plays host to a stack of terrific add-ons that add additional features and tweak existing ones. Read more