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The Pinebook Pro, a $199 Linux Laptop, Inches Closer to Launch

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

So when can you buy one?

Well, there’s still no firm release date for the Pinebook Pro — but it should be soon. Pine64 is a company proficient in getting things up, ready and (importantly) shipped.

Although posts like this one may hype the device it’s important that no-one set their expectations too highly. Do not expect performance of a Dell XPS 13 in a machine priced cheaper than most Chromebooks!

No word on precisely which version of Ubuntu will be offered for this device or whether it’ll come pre-installed — if anyone from Pinebook is reading this, do ping us with details — but I’d like to imagine it’d ship Ubuntu 18.04.1 (with its newer kernel and graphics stack) and a more modest desktop environment like MATE.

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Also by Brad Linder:

  • Pinebook Pro update: The $199 Linux laptop is almost ready to go

    After unveiling plans to launch a $199 Linux laptop with a Rockchip RK3399 processor earlier this year, the folks at Pine64 have been hard at work designing the hardware and software for the upcoming Pinebook Pro.

    Now the team has posted a YouTube video showing off the latest prototype, and demonstrating that it has improved hardware, and support for 4K video playback (something the company’s original Pinebook couldn’t handle).

    Pine64 still has some kinks to work out — audio isn’t working on the current motherboard, and there are problems with charging, suspend and resume. But it looks like the Pinebook Pro could be ready to ship within months.

GNU and Linux at Google: Laptops, Servers and Cars

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server
Google
  • Chrome OS 74 Stable version arrives: Here’s what you need to know

    It’s only been a month since Chrome OS 73 landed on the Stable Channel and here we are with Chrome OS 74 now available. Google announced Chrome OS 74 for the Stable Channel this past week and it’s filled with fixes and new features for Chromebooks.

  • Google Cloud is the single-largest driver of headcount growth at Google

    The number of people working at Google surged 21 percent in the first quarter compared to the same period last year, and its Google Cloud division was the main factor.

    Google announced Monday as part of its quarterly earnings report that 103,459 people now work for the search giant, which has also been scrambling to build a cloud computing business that can match the likes of Amazon Web Services and Microsoft. “Cloud has continued to be the primary driver of headcount,” said Google CFO Ruth Porat on a conference call with analysts following the release of the results.

  • Google opens Android Automotive OS to Spotify, other media app developers

    Google is opening its Android Automotive operating system up to third-party developers to bring music and other entertainment apps into vehicle infotainment systems, starting with the Polestar 2, an all-electric vehicle developed by Volvo’s standalone electric performance brand.

    Google announced Wednesday that media app developers will be able to create new entertainment experiences for Android Automotive OS and the Polestar 2, starting at Google I/O 2019, the annual developer’s conference that kicks off May 7.

Top 15 Best Linux Synthesizers for Digital Audio Production in 2019

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

A synthesizer is a computer program that enables artists or music enthusiasts to create digital audio. They are also referred to as softsynths and comprise an integral part of the digital music industry. Synthesizers employ various methods to generate audio sound while at the same time offering a wide array of services essential for professional music production. As a significant player in the computing world, Linux supports some of the best synthesizer programs that can be used by both professionals and hobbyists alike. Finding the right synthesizer, however, can be a daunting task if you do not have any prior knowledge. To help you bag the right synthesizer for your needs, we compiled this guide outlining the 15 best Linux synthesizers available right now.

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Also: Slimbook – Another Battery Saving Tool for Ubuntu

4MLinux 28.2 released.

Filed under
GNU
Linux

This is a minor (point) release in the 4MLinux STABLE channel, which comes with the Linux kernel 4.19.35. The 4MLinux Server now includes Apache 2.4.39, MariaDB 10.3.14, and PHP 7.2.17 (see this post for more details).

You can update your 4MLinux by executing the "zk update" command in your terminal (fully automatic process).

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Ubuntu chief surprised by desktop support boom

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

In a discussion at the OpenStack Foundation’s Open Infrastructure Summit recently, Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Ubuntu Linux and its commercial holding company Canonical, admitted he’d been caught on the hop by the change in demand.

“We have seen companies signing up for Linux desktop support, because they want to have fleets of Ubuntu desktop for their artificial intelligence engineers,” he said in the conversation as reported by ZDNet. It seems therefore that companies are placing literal dollar-value on the continuity of their development processes, to the extent that they need to ensure that Ubuntu keeps running.

Like many companies in the free and open source software area (FOSS), Canonical distributes its Ubuntu platform for free, but funds itself and its own on-going development efforts by means of support contracts. Others doing likewise are SUSE and of course, Red Hat, whose Fedora-flavor of Linux has long been a common workhorse, alongside Ubuntu, FreeBSD and the other various Linux distributions in the data centers of private concerns and public clouds.

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Gaming via Linux: Looking To The Future – What’s The Outlook For Gamers?

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GNU
Linux
Gaming

For a long time, of the operating systems out there, Linux was a distinct “also-ran” when it came to gaming. However, this all changed with the explosion of mobile gaming. It’s fair to say that over the years since its introduction in the early 1990s, Linux has gradually moved away from the domain of the IT-savvy developer and broken into the mainstream thanks to distributions like Ubuntu and Linux Mint – with around 1.3 billion Android devices using a Linux operating system.

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5 top Linux server distros: How to choose the right one

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

Choosing the right Linux server product can be a daunting task, and with all the different versions of the Linux OS out there, you have a long list to choose from. Are you looking for a supported product, or can you go with a free version? Do you need cloud support or virtualization? We aim to provide some answers and some clarity.

What are Linux servers and why does your business need one?

While the Linux OS was originally conceived as a desktop operating system that would rival windows, it really found its footing in the server space. A Linux server runs the most efficient and powerful variants of the OS, and Linux servers are designed to handle the most demanding business application requirements. Linux servers are used for network and system administration, database management, web services and much more.

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GCC 9.1 Released

Filed under
Development
GNU
  • GCC 9 Release Series

    The GNU project and the GCC developers are pleased to announce the release of GCC 9.1.

    This release is a major release, containing new features (as well as many other improvements) relative to GCC 8.x.

  • GCC 9.1 Released

    We are proud to announce the next, major release of the
    GNU Compiler Collection.

    If you want to boost your software with a fresh new compiler,
    with new language features, various new optimizations,
    improvements to old optimizations, GCC 9.1 is here for you!

    GCC 9.1 is a major release containing substantial new
    functionality not available in GCC 9.x or previous GCC releases.

    In this release C++17 support is no longer marked experimental. The
    C++ front-end implements the full C++17 language (already previous GCC
    major version implemented that) and the C++ standard library support is
    almost complete. The C++ front-end and library also have numerous further
    C++2a draft features [1]. GCC has a new front-end for the D language.
    GCC 9.1 has newly partial OpenMP 5.0 support and almost
    complete OpenACC 2.5 support.

  • GCC 9.1 Released As Huge Compiler Update With D Language, Zen 2, OpenMP 5, C++2A, C2X

    GNU Compiler Collection 9.1 was released today with a D language front-end joining the family while on the back-end is now the long-awaited Radeon GCN GPU target (although not too useful in its current form), Intel Cascadelake support, initial AMD Zen 2, C-SKY CPU support, OpenRISC CPU support, and many other features throughout this massive open-source compiler.

    GCC 9.1 was released this morning as the first stable release in the GCC 9 series. GCC 9 is easily one of the most exciting GCC compiler updates in years and comes with many new features and improvements. After closely following its development the past year, it's great to see GCC 9.1 now out there. GCC 9 is already found in the likes of Fedora 30, Clear Linux, and other Linux distributions should begin making use of this big compiler update in their next release cycles (or hopefully soon for the rolling-release platforms).

Sparky 4.10

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

New live/install images of SparkyLinux 4.10 “Tyche” are available to download.
Sparky 4 is based on Debian stable line of “Stretch”.

Sparky 4.10 offers a fully featured operating system with a lightweight LXDE desktop environment; and minimal images of MinimalGUI (Openbox) and MinimalCLI (text mode) which lets you install the base system with a desktop of your choice with a minimal set of applications, via the Sparky Advanced Installer.

Sparky 4.10 armhf offers a fully featured operating system for single board mini computers RaspberryPi; with the Openbox window manager as default; and a minimal, text mode CLI image to customize it as you like.

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Also: Sergio Durigan Junior: Debian Bug Squashing Party, Toronto version

Darling Still Has A Goal Of Running macOS Apps On Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Mac

Darling is the open-source project we first covered back in 2012 that aimed to be able to run macOS software (binaries) on Linux. It's what Wine is to running Windows programs on Linux but rather to be able to handle Apple/Mac software. While we haven't heard much from the project recently, they still are pursuing their goal.

Over the years Darling has made some project on handling Mac binaries on Linux albeit times that the project seemed on hiatus without any development work. The last time we covered Darling on Phoronix was in November of 2017 when they were still aiming for macOS apps on Linux.

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Direct: Darling Progress Report Q1 2019

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More in Tux Machines

Graphics: Red Hat's Wayland Agenda and AMD Begins Queueing Graphics Driver Changes For The Linux 5.3 Kernel

  • Hans de Goede: Wayland itches summary
    1. Middle click on title / header bar to lower the Window does not work for native apps. Multiple people have reported this issue to me. A similar issue was fixed for not being able to raise Windows. It should be easy to apply a similar fix for the lowering problem. There are bugs open for this here, here and here. 2. Running graphical apps via sudo or pxexec does not work. There are numerous examples of apps breaking because of this, such as lshw-gui and usbivew. At least for X11 apps this is not that hard to fix. But sofar this has deliberately not been fixed. The reasoning behind this is described in this bug. I agree with the reasoning behind this, but I think it is not pragmatic to immediately disallow all GUI apps to connect when run as root starting today.
  • Hans de Goede: Better support for running games under Wayland (with GNOME3/mutter as compositor)
    First of all I do not want people to get their hopes up about $subject of this blogpost. Improving gaming support is a subjects which holds my personal interest and it is an issue I plan to spend time on trying to improve. But this will take a lot of time (think months for simple things, years for more complex things).
  • AMD Begins Queueing Graphics Driver Changes For The Linux 5.3 Kernel
    Being past the Linux 5.2 kernel merge window, AMD's open-source Linux graphics driver developers have already begun queuing changes anticipated for Linux 5.3 via a work-in-progress tree. Given the short time that this 5.3 WIP tree has been around, there isn't too much exciting about the changes -- yet. But surely over the weeks ahead it will get interesting. Making things particularly interesting is that we are expecting initial Navi support to make it for Linux 5.3... In recent weeks AMD began pushing AMDGPU LLVM compiler back-end changes for GFX10/Navi and we expect the AMDGPU DRM kernel driver enablement to come for Linux 5.3. Linux 5.3 will already be arriving after the rumored release of the first Navi graphics cards so having to wait past 5.3 for mainline support would already be tragic. But given the recent LLVM activity, we expect AMD to push out the Navi kernel driver changes soon. For that likely massive patch-set to be reviewed in time, the Navi patches would need to make their debut within the next few weeks.

today's howtos and programming

Fedora 30 Workstation review - Smarter, faster and buggier

Fedora 30 is definitely one of the more interesting releases of this family in a long-time. It brings significant changes, including solid improvements in the desktop performance and responsiveness. Over the years, Fedora went from no proprietary stuff whatsoever to slowly acknowledging the modern needs of computing, so now it gives you MP3 codecs and you can install graphics drivers and such. Reasonable looks, plus good functionality across the board. However, there were tons of issues, too. Printing to Samba, video screenshot bug, installer cropped-image slides, package management complications, mouse cursor lag, oopses, average battery life, and inadequate usability out of the box. You need to change the defaults to have a desktop that can be used in a quick, efficient way without remembering a dozen nerdy keyboard shortcuts. All in all, I like the freshness. In general, it would seem the Linux desktop is seeing a cautious revival, and Fedora's definitely a happy player. But there are too many rough edges. Well, we got performance tweaks after so many years, and codecs, we might get window buttons and desktop icons one day back, too. Something like 6/10, and definitely worth exploring. I am happy enough to do two more tests. I will run an in-vivo upgrade on the F29 instance on this same box, and then also test the distro on an old Nvidia-powered laptop, which will showcase both the support for proprietary graphics (didn't work the last time) and performance improvements, if they scale for old hardware, too. That's all for now. Read more

Events: Automotive at LF, Linux Clusters Institute, Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC)

  • Automotive Linux Summit and Open Source Summit Japan Keynote Speakers and Schedule Announced
    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source has announced the speaker line up for Open Source Summit Japan and Automotive Linux Summit. One registration provides access to all content at both events, which will be held July 17-19 at the Toranomon Hills Forum in Tokyo. Open Source Summit Japan (OSSJ) and Automotive Linux Summit (ALS) will bring together top talent from companies on the leading edge of innovation including Toyota Motor Corporation, Uber, Intel, Sony, Google, Microsoft and more. Talks will cover a range of topics, with ALS talks on everything from infrastructure and hardware to compliance and security; and OSSJ sessions on AI, Linux systems, cloud infrastructure, cloud native applications, open networking, edge computing, safety and security and open source best practices.
  • Register Now for the 2019 Introductory Linux Clusters Institute Workshop
    Registration is now open for the 2019 Linux Clusters Institute (LCI) Introductory Workshop,which will be held August 19-23, 2019 at the Rutgers University Inn & Conference Center in New Brunswick, NJ. This workshop will cover the fundamentals of setting up and administering a high-performance computing (HPC) cluster and will be led by leading HPC experts.
  • Additional early bird slots available for LPC 2019
    The Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC) registration web site has been showing “sold out” recently because the cap on early bird registrations was reached. We are happy to report that we have reviewed the registration numbers for this year’s conference and were able to open more early bird registration slots. Beyond that, regular registration will open July 1st. Please note that speakers and microconference runners get free passes to LPC, as do some microconference presenters, so that may be another way to attend the conference. Time is running out for new refereed-track and microconference proposals, so visit the CFP page soon. Topics for accepted microconferences are welcome as well.