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GNU

FWUL, the Linux distro designed for Android debugging and modding, hits version 3.0

Filed under
Android
Development
GNU
Linux

Chances are, at least once in a lifetime, you needed to flash your Android device or simply use adb or fastboot for debugging purposes. Considering the fact that Windows has more than 80% market share on the operating system market, chances are even higher that you use it. That’s why it’s sometimes so hard to properly use the advanced debugging tools on this platform. I’ve even had problems after reinstalling adb a couple of times, and then using the full Android Studio SDK tools.

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Linux Fu: Easier File Watching

Filed under
GNU
Linux
HowTos

In an earlier installment of Linux Fu, I mentioned how you can use inotifywait to efficiently watch for file system changes. The comments had a lot of alternative ways to do the same job, which is great. But there was one very easy-to-use tool that didn’t show up, so I wanted to talk about it. That tool is entr. It isn’t as versatile, but it is easy to use and covers a lot of common use cases where you want some action to occur when a file changes.

The program is dead simple. It reads a list of file names on its standard input. It will then run a command and repeat it any time the input files change. There are a handful of options we’ll talk about in a bit, but it is really that simple. For example, try this after you install entr with your package manager.

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Linux Backup Types Explained and Best Practices

Filed under
GNU
Linux

In today's technical world, the importance of Linux seems to be increasing. And there are innumerable reasons behind this popularity, including stability, box security, rock-solid reliability, and much more. If you are a freshly minted Linux administrator, one of the primary challenges in front of you would be to implement a dependable and reliable backup system, isn't it?

Whether you use bootable flash drives for this task or any other sturdy place, the importance of backup cannot be denied. Considering the number of options available out there, selecting one can be quite overwhelming of a process. Having said that, here are some of the best backup types that you can try out.

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Desktops, Laptops and Distros: Lenovo Thinkpad T480s Business Laptop, Clear Linux, Chromebooks

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Reviewed: The Lenovo Thinkpad T480s Business Laptop
  • Clear Linux Outlines How You Can Build Your Own Linux Distro In 10 Minutes

    While Intel's Clear Linux is known to the most of you for its speed, it's also a distribution that is very easy to build off of for specific use-cases should you want your own pre-configured Linux OS. 

    Clear Linux tweeted out this week that with their mixer software you can build your own Clear Linux distribution in "less than 10 minutes" using its mixing software. Spinning your own Clear Linux distribution is done using their Mixer tool that is built around their package management concept of bundles with swupd.

  • 19 days of productivity in 2019: The fails

    There seems to be a mad rush at the beginning of every year to find ways to be more productive. New Year's resolutions, the itch to start the year off right, and of course, an "out with the old, in with the new" attitude all contribute to this. And the usual round of recommendations is heavily biased towards closed source and proprietary software. It doesn't have to be that way.

    Part of being productive is accepting that failure happens. I am a big proponent of Howard Tayler's Maxim 70: "Failure is not an option—it is mandatory. The option is whether or not to let failure be the last thing you do." And there were many things I wanted to talk about in this series that I failed to find good answers for.

    So, for the final edition of my 19 new (or new-to-you) open source tools to help you be more productive in 2019, I present the tools I wanted but didn't find. I am hopeful that you, the reader, will be able to help me find some good solutions to the items below. If you do, please share them in the comments.

  • Lenovo’s 4K Yoga Chromebook C630 Is Available to Order

    While certain Chrome OS devices already come with high-resolution displays—like the Pixelbook and Pixel Slate—there’s hasn’t been one with a 4K display. Until the Lenovo Yoga Chromebook C630, that is. And now you can buy one.

    We can talk about whether you need a 4K display in your Chromebook (read: you probably don’t), but at the end of the day, there’s always an argument for just how damn good a display looks when it’s absolutely packed with pixels. I’m sure this one is no exception.

  • Native backup and restoring of Linux containers in Crostini targeted for Chrome OS 74

    While using Linux on a Chromebook is helpful, if something happens to the Linux container, you could easily lose all of your installed apps, data, and settings. There is a manual method to import and export a container if you’re familiar with LXD in Linux, but Crostini in Chrome OS is getting a native function to do the same according to the Chromium commit log.

PineTab Linux tablet coming in 2019 for $79 and up

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Pine64 has big plans for 2019. The company, which produces low-power, low-cost computers capable of running GNU/Linux and BSD software, plans to release its first smartphone this year, as well as a $199 laptop that will be its most powerful model to date.

Also on the horizon? A dirt cheap Linux tablet.

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Pinebook Pro Linux laptop coming this year for $199

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Pine64 has been selling cheap Linux laptops for a few years, and now the company is getting ready to launch something a little… less cheap.

With a target price of $199, the upcoming Pinebook Pro certainly isn’t a high-end computer. But for about twice the price of the original Pinebook you get a full HD display, twice the RAM, much more storage, and a significantly more powerful processor.

The company says unlike its first laptops, the Pinebook Pro is a computer that could theoretically replace your existing laptop as a daily driver… assuming you’re looking for a computer that runs open source software. Think of the Pinebook Pro as a sort of Chromebook that runs GNU/Linux-based operating systems like Debian rather than Google’s Chrome OS.

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PinePhone Linux Smartphone Priced At $149 To Arrive This Year

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gadgets

Smartphone users are usually torn between the two choices — Android or iOS. Their dominance is such that other competing OS like Windows, BlackBerry OS, or Symbian have almost been abandoned.

Those who don’t want either of them can opt for Pine64’s Linux phone dubbed the PinePhone, which offers good hardware and software at an affordable rate of $149.

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The road to Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Beta

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Red Hat

Now that Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Beta is out in the wild, I wanted to describe the process that got us here. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Beta is the culmination of several years of feature development by Red Hat engineers and many others, in open source communities that we refer to collectively as “upstream.”

In these upstream software projects, contributions from our hardware and software partners, community members, and even our customers are designed, developed and refined. Work from the Linux kernel, the GNOME community, and thousands of individual projects are then integrated in the Fedora distribution as a release such as Fedora 28, from which we branch to form the base of Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

All along this path, Red Hat engineers work closely in these upstream communities and Fedora, and must represent what is best for both our customers, our partners, and for the upstream project itself. It’s a delicate balance, which is one reason why we are very proud of the talent and integrity of our engineering teams.

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Releasing Slax 9.7.0

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

Good news, a new and improved version of Slax has been just released as Slax 9.7.0.

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Also: Slax 9.7.0 Released With This Desktop Linux Distribution Down To 255MB

Alpine 3.9.0 released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

We are pleased to announce the release of Alpine Linux 3.9.0, the first in the v3.9 stable series.

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Also: Alpine 3.9 Brings ARMv7 Support, Switches Back To OpenSSL, Improves GRUB

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More in Tux Machines

Essential System Tools: QDirStat – Excellent Qt-based directory statistics

This is the latest in our series of articles highlighting essential system tools. These are small, indispensable utilities, useful for system administrators as well as regular users of Linux based systems. The series examines both graphical and text based open source utilities. For this article, we’ll look at QDirStat, a graphical application to show what’s devouring your disk space and help you tidy up the disorder. For details of all tools in this series, please check the table at the summary page of this article. QDirStat is a continuation of the KDirStat utility. QDirStat is based on the latest Qt 5, and doesn’t need any KDE libraries or infrastructure. If you come from a Windows background you’ve probably tried WinDirStat, a Windows port of KDirStat, the predecessor of QDirStat. Read more

KDE is adding Matrix to its instant messaging infrastructure

KDE has been looking for a better way of chatting and live-sharing information for several years now. IRC has been a good solution for a long time, but it has centralized servers KDE cannot control. It is also insecure and lacks features users have come to expect from more modern IM services. Other alternatives, such as Telegram, Slack and Discord, although feature-rich, are centralized and built around closed-source technologies and offer even less control than IRC. This flies in the face of KDE's principles that require we use and support technologies based on Free software. However, our search for a better solution has finally come to an end: as of today we are officially using Matrix for collaboration within KDE! Matrix is an open protocol and network for decentralised communication, backed by an open standard and open source reference implementations for servers, clients, client SDKs, bridges, bots and more. It provides all the features you’d expect from a modern chat system: infinite scrollback, file transfer, typing notifications, read receipts, presence, search, push notifications, stickers, VoIP calling and conferencing, etc. It even provides end-to-end encryption (based on Signal’s double ratchet algorithm) for when you want some privacy. Read more Also: KDE To Support Matrix Decentralized Instant Messaging

Android Leftovers

Canonical Is Planning Some Awesome New Content For The Snap Store

There I was, thoughtfully drafting an article titled "3 Things Canonical Can Do To Improve The Snap Ecosystem," when I jumped on the phone with Evan Dandrea, an Engineering Manager who just so happens to be responsible for the Snapcraft ecosystem at Canonical. As it turns out, that headline will need a slight edit. One less number. That's because I've just learned Canonical has some ambitious plans for the future of the Snap Store. Read more