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GNU

Linux Mint 18 to Offer Cinnamon 3.0 and MATE 1.14 Flavors, Arc GTK-Based Theme

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GNU
Linux

The Linux Mint project is alive and kicking, despite the unfortunate "hacking" issues that happened at the end of February 2016, and team leader Clement Lefebvre talks today about the upcoming features in Linux Mint 18.

As you might very well be aware, the major Linux Mint 18 release is coming this year as a free upgrade to existing Linux Mint 17.3 "Rosa" users, bringing a ton of new features, improvements to the in-house built apps, as well as the latest versions of the Cinnamon and MATE desktop environments.

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Also: [Mint] Monthly News – March 2016

GNU/Games: Linux vs Windows Benchmarks

Filed under
GNU
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Gaming

Linux Mint 18 to Offer Cinnamon 3.0 and MATE 1.14 Flavors, Arc GTK-Based Theme

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The Linux Mint project is alive and kicking, despite the unfortunate "hacking" issues that happened at the end of February 2016, and team leader Clement Lefebvre talks today about the upcoming features in Linux Mint 18.

As you might very well be aware, the major Linux Mint 18 release is coming this year a free upgrade to existing Linux Mint 17.3 "Rosa" users, bringing a ton of new features, improvements to the in-house built apps, as well as the latest versions of the Cinnamon and MATE desktop environments.

Read more

Chakra GNU/Linux Gets KDE Plasma 5.6.2, Frameworks 5.21.0, and LibreOffice 5.1.2

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Chakra GNU/Linux maintainer Neofytos Kolokotronis has just announced a few minutes ago the availability of the latest KDE technologies in the main repositories of the Arch Linux-based operating system.

Just like Arch Linux, Chakra GNU/Linux is a rolling release distribution, which means that users install it once and get free updates for the rest of their lives, or at least until they decide to move to another Linux kernel-based operating system.

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Torvalds prepared to spend next 25 years helping Linux conquer the desktop

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GNU
Linux
  • Torvalds prepared to spend next 25 years helping Linux conquer the desktop

    The phrase "year of the Linux desktop" has been around for well over a decade but has become more of a meme rather than a statement of fact. Without a doubt, Linux has seen much success on mobile devices, including smartphones and tablets, as well as servers, network appliances and the emerging "internet of things" device category. However, despite Microsoft stumbling with Windows Vista and Windows 8.x, Linux failed to capitalize on these moments of weakness.

  • Linux can still beat Windows in the desktop war, and Linus Torvalds is 'working on it'

    While Linux has lost many battles to Microsoft on the desktop, the war is not over. Torvalds pledges to dedicate the next 25 years of his life to usurping Windows. Will the open source kernel prove victorious on the desktop? It is totally possible. After all, time is not finite, and even the Roman Empire fell. If you follow history, nothing lasts forever and that should ring true for Microsoft's stranglehold on the desktop.

  • Linus Torvalds: “I’ll Spend Next 25 Years To Help Linux Beat Windows In Desktop War”

    While Linux and other open source technologies continue to rule the server and mobile markets, the desktop arena is still dominated by Windows operating systems. Linux creator Linus Torvalds knows this fact very well and expresses his commitment to work hard to make Linux a bigger force in the desktop war.

GNU/kWindows

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • GNU/kWindows

    There has been a lot of talk lately about a most unique combination: GNU—the fully free/libre operating system—and Microsoft Windows—the freedom-denying, user-controlling, surveillance system. There has also been a great deal of misinformation. I’d like to share my thoughts.

    [...]

    Free software is absolutely essential: it ensures that users, who are the most vulnerable, are in control of their computing—not software developers or corporations. Any program that denies users any one of their four freedoms is non-free (or proprietary)—that is, freedom-denying software. This means that any non-free software, no matter its features or performance, will always be inferior to free software that performs a similar task.

    Not everyone likes talking about freedom or the free software philosophy. This disagreement resulted in the “open source” development methodology, which exists to sell the benefits of free software to businesses without discussing the essential ideological considerations. Under the “open source” philosophy, if a non-free program provides better features or performance, then surely it must be “better”, because they have outperformed the “open source” development methodology; non-free software isn’t always considered to be a bad thing.

    [...]

    Secondly, when you see someone using a GNU/kWindows system, politely ask them why. Tell them that there is a better operating system out there—the GNU/Linux operating system—that not only provides those technical features, but also provides the feature of freedom! Tell them what free software is, and try to relate it to them so that they understand why it is important, and even practical.

    It’s good to see more people benefiting from GNU; but we can’t be happy when it is being sold as a means to draw users into an otherwise proprietary surveillance system, without so much as a mention of our name, or what it is that we stand for.

  • Good bye “open source”; hello “free software”

    Everyone has at least a good reason to prefer software freedom over non-free software products.

Linux Mint security – 28 days later

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GNU
Linux
Security

Linux Mint has suffered a reputation damage, which has led to doubts and questions being raised in the community. Valid questions, because you don’t want any private, confidential data to be transmitted to a third party without your knowledge and consent. So you may want to check if Mint is clean, and whether it can be used safely. This article outlines the technical methods.

However, you should also not forget that this is not the first, nor the last hack of a website related to a distro project. All the big names have had similar issues in the past. Moreover, obscurity does not guarantee security. If you’ve never thought about this topic before Feb 20, then you really should not be focusing too much energy on it now. Because all the other times you downloaded packages and updates your system, there could have been a breach somewhere, but since you were not aware of it, you did not do anything about it. Now you are aware, but it does not change the reality, only your perception. You may want to double-check everything now, it’s a natural reaction, but it’s not really grounded in any hard, solid facts. If anything, the hack only helps put more security highlight on the distros and their management, so they should now be more secure than ever before.

There.

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Q4OS 1.4.9, Orion

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GNU
Linux

We introduce 'Bourbon' start menu, the brand new default start menu in Q4OS. The two panel 'Bourbon' menu is highly efficient and customizable and features a search line, favorites, history and more options.

Q4OS 1.4.9 'Orion' is based on the most recent Debian 8.4 'Jessie' stable version released a few days ago. System packages have been updated and important security patches have been applied. A significant update for the native Q4OS uninstaller fixes the unintentional removal of the 'locales' package. Numerous under the hood improvements is provided as usual.

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When Free Software Depends On Non-Free

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GNU

When a program is free software (free as in freedom), that means it gives users the four freedoms (gnu.org/philosophy/free-sw.html) so that they control what the program does. In most cases, that is sufficient for the program's distribution to be ethical; but not always. There are additional problems that can arise in specific circumstances. This article describes a subtle problem, where upgrading the free program requires using a nonfree program.

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GNU/Linux will eventually be desktop king

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GNU
Linux
  • Linux will eventually be desktop king

    Linux inventor Linus Torvalds has told the world that he has not given up on replacing Windows on the desktop with his glorious creation.

    Linux, which is now 25 years old, has done well on the network and on mobiles, but has not ever become a serious threat to Windows. For many years some bright spark declares that this year will be the year of Linux on the desk-top but it never arrived. Lately such calls have been fewer, ironically as more PC's use Linux for gaming.

  • Linus has not given up on desktops

    The colourful Linux creator Linus Torvalds has not given up on replacing Windows on the desktop with his sort of stuff.

    Speaking from his bed at the Embedded Linux Conference, Torvalds said that Linux had not been a failure on the desktop.

    “The desktop hasn’t really taken over the world like Linux has in many other areas, but just looking at my own use, my desktop looks so much better than I ever could have imagined,” he told the throngs.

  • Wearing ’em Down

    In 1995, GNU/Linux was in the fight but was forced to the flanks by exclusive dealing and a war of FUD. In 2016, ARM is designing whole CPUs and systems and manufacturers are designing motherboards perfectly capable of running desktops and mobile thingies and IoTs while Intel fights a rearguard action, trying to stem the tide of applications that don’t involve Wintel or even Intel.

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Open source SDR SBC runs Snappy Ubuntu on Cyclone V

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Critical Infrastructure Goes Open Source

The electrical grid, water, roads and bridges—the infrastructure we take for granted—is seldom noticed until it's unavailable. The burgeoning open source software movement is taking steps to help rebuild crumbling U.S. civil infrastructure while capitalizing on expansion in emerging markets by providing software building blocks to help develop interoperable and secure transportation, electric power, oil and gas as well as the healthcare infrastructure. Under a program launched in April called the Civil Infrastructure Platform, the Linux Foundation said the initiative would provide "an open source base layer of industrial grade software to enable the use and implementation of software building blocks for civil infrastructure." Read more

Where have all the MacBooks gone at Linux conferences?

In past years, the vast ocean of Apple logos really undercut any statement of “Linux is great.” People would, inevitably, retort with, “Then why are all the 'Linux People' using Macs?” Admittedly, that was a great point and has been a source of shame for many of us for a very long time. But now things are different. The Apple logos are (mostly) gone from Linux conferences. This may be an unscientific observation from one person attending a few conferences in North America. Regardless, it's a great feeling. Read more

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • Ubuntu 16.04 to-do list
    UBUNTU 16.04 or Xenial Xerus, the latest upgrade of the popular Linux distribution, became available as a free download last month, and early reviews have been favorable. Instead of upgrading my existing Ubuntu 15.10 system, this time I opted for a fresh install. I also decided to give the improved Unity 7 desktop a go, instead of installing my preferred alternative XFCE. The installation process was trouble-free, but because I started from scratch, I had quite a bit to add and tweak after the OS itself was installed.
  • Ubuntu Founder Pledges No Back Doors in Linux
    VIDEO: Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Canonical and Ubuntu, discusses what might be coming in Ubuntu 16.10 later this year and why security is something he will never compromise. Ubuntu developers are gathering this week for the Ubuntu Online Summit (UOS), which runs from May 3-5, to discuss development plans for the upcoming Ubuntu 16.10 Linux distribution release, code-named "Yakkety Yak."
  • Ubuntu & Other Ubuntu Spins Look At Making Room To Grow
    With Ubuntu's install images continuing to be oversized with pushing 1.4GB on recent releases, Ubuntu developer Steve Langasek has raised the new limit for Ubuntu desktop images to 2GB. Other Ubuntu flavors are also following in this move. Langasek has raised the size limit for images now to 2GB for being able to accomodate the current oversized images plus still having room to grow.
  • Ubuntu’s Snap packages aren’t yet as secure as Canonical’s marketing claims
    Canonical has been talking up Snaps, a new type of package format featured in Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. “Users can install a snap without having to worry whether it will have an impact on their other apps or their system,” reads Canonical’s announcement. But this isn’t true, as prominent free software developer Matthew Garrett recently pointed out.