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4MLinux 29.0 STABLE released.

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GNU
Linux

The status of the‭ ‬4MLinux‭ ‬29.0‭ ‬series has been changed to STABLE.‭ ‬Edit your documents with LibreOffice‭ ‬6.2.4.2‭ ‬and GNOME Office‭ (‬AbiWord‭ ‬3.0.2,‭ ‬GIMP‭ ‬2.10.10,‭ ‬Gnumeric‭ ‬1.12.44‭)‬,‭ ‬share your files using DropBox‭ ‬73.4.118,‭ ‬surf the Internet with Firefox‭ ‬66.0.5‭ ‬and Chromium‭ ‬74.0.3729.108,‭ ‬send emails via Thunderbird‭ ‬60.7.0,‭ ‬enjoy your music collection with Audacious‭ ‬3.10.1,‭ ‬watch your favorite videos with VLC‭ ‬3.0.6‭ ‬and mpv‭ ‬0.29.1,‭ ‬play games powered by Mesa‭ ‬18.3.1‭ ‬and Wine‭ ‬4.7.‭ ‬You can also setup the‭ ‬4MLinux LAMP Server‭ (‬Linux‭ ‬4.19.41,‭ ‬Apache‭ ‬2.4.39,‭ ‬MariaDB‭ ‬10.3.14,‭ ‬PHP‭ ‬5.6.40‭ ‬and PHP‭ ‬7.3.5‭)‬.‭ ‬Perl‭ ‬5.28.1,‭ ‬Python‭ ‬2.7.15,‭ ‬and Python‭ ‬3.7.1‭ ‬are also available.‭

‬As always,‭ ‬the new major release has some new features:‭ Audacious available out of the box, a new desktop ‬sub-menu called “Office” ‭(‬with AbiWord, Gnumeric, LazPaint‭)‬,‭ spellcheck functionality added to Sylpheed and HexChat, improved LibreOffice installation script, better support for MINIX file system (via ‬util-linux‭ and GParted)‬,‭ much improved ‬3D acceleration in Quake2. And finally, the 4MServer now includes PHP 7.3 with NaCl cryptography support.

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A look over the ProtonDB reports for May 2019, over 5,000 Windows games reported working on Linux

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GNU
Linux
Gaming

ProtonDB, the unofficial tracker for checking the status of Windows games played on Linux through Steam Play has another data-dump available. Here's a look for May 2019. We seem to have also reached a new milestone lately, with well over 5,000 Windows games reported to work.

That 5K (5,200 exactly at time of writing) should be taken with a pinch of salt of course, as plenty of titles have only a few reports and as with anything generated by user submitted reports the accuracy of them will vary but it's still very impressive overall.

Anyway, here's our quick monthly look over some of the details. Starting with the total number of reports being sent per month. As we can see the upwards trend of reports being sent in has continued now for three months although May only slightly beat April.

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Linux Mint Monthly News – May 2019

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GNU
Linux

Last month I mentioned the amazing amount of support we received from you, the many emails you sent us to tell us you enjoyed our work and how great it felt. We need to move on from this and not feel overly confident over it, but as you may know there is a month between what happens and the moment we can report on the donations we received, and, well… we received many

Google: Chrome OS, Chrome and Antitrust

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GNU
Linux
Google
Web
  • It’s Not Just You – Linux Apps Are Completely Broken With The Latest Dev Channel Update

    For those of us that hang around in the Beta, Dev and Canary Channels of Chrome OS on a regular basis, we’re pretty accustomed to bugs and issues. It is part of the territory when you live on the bleeding edge of technology, and as you climb the ladder of Chrome releases, the OS becomes more and more unstable.

    Today’s bug report is a pretty big one, however, and we wanted to make sure that everyone that lives in the Dev Channel on a regular basis is aware that this particular issue in the latest update that rolled out yesterday looks to be affecting everyone.

    So, what is happening, exactly? From what we can tell so far, the Linux container will install just fine, but as soon as anything is run or installed, the container will not ever come back online. No restarts will help, unfortunately, and the only way to get Linux containers to respond again is to fully remove them and re-install.

  • Google to restrict modern ad blocking Chrome extensions to enterprise users

    Back in January, Google announced a proposed change to Chrome’s extensions system, called Manifest V3, that would stop current ad blockers from working efficiently. In a response to the overwhelming negative feedback, Google is standing firm on Chrome’s ad blocking changes, sharing that current ad blocking capabilities will be restricted to enterprise users.

  • Google's API changes mean only paid enterprise users of Chrome will be able to access full adblock

    Google has warned investors that "New and existing technologies could affect our ability to customize ads and/or could block ads online, which would harm our business," and ad blocker developers like Raymond Hill of Ublock Origin have speculated that "Google’s primary business is incompatible with unimpeded content blocking. Now that Google Chrome product has achieve high market share, the content blocking concerns as stated in its 10K filing are being tackled."

  • Google is facing an imminent antitrust investigation from the US Justice Department

    Citing anonymous sources, the WSJ says the Federal Trade Commission, which works alongside the DOJ to bring federal antitrust cases, will defer to the Justice Department in this case. Prior to this, the FTC brought a case against the company in 2011 related to the placement of tracking cookies in Apple’s Safari browser. That case was resolved a year later with a $22.5 million civil penalty judgement, at the time the largest such judgement the FTC had ever earned in court. According to the WSJ, the FTC then investigated Google in 2013 for broad antitrust violations, but closed the case without taking any action against the search giant. Now, the DOJ is leading the charge on a new, potentially unprecedented antitrust evaluation of the company.

Top 30 Best Help Desk Software for Businesses That Leverage Linux

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GNU
Linux
Software

Since a plethora of powerful service desk software exists in the Linux ecosystem, corporations often find it hard to select the most suitable option for their business. Different types of help desk software are required in different scenarios, and Linux offers plenty for each of your corporate need. Our experts have compiled this guide outlining a massive selection of 30 of the best tools of the trade to make your selection as flexible as possible.

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System76 Is Making Progress On Open-Source Firmware For Their Laptops

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

For the past number of months Linux PC maker System76 has been beginning to work on Coreboot support for their products and over the course of May they addressed more obstacles in order to begin having this open-source firmware implementation work on some of their laptops.

When it comes to their firmware hacking efforts during May 2019, here is what they wrote in their monthly status report: "The camera toggle hotkey is now functional. The last remaining hardware issues with running open firmware on our laptops lie with Thunderbolt. On Whiskey Lake chipsets, the Thunderbolt controller is often not in a functional state after suspending/resuming the system. On Kaby Lake chipsets, the Thunderbolt controller is never visible...A new BIOS setup menu is also being designed for our open firmware so that the look and feel is consistent with the beautiful aesthetic you can expect from a System76 product. This will be implemented once the new firmware is ready for release."

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Distros News: DistroWatch Turns 18, GParted Live 1.0.0 Has a Bugfix Release and QtFM Comes to Sparky

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GNU
Linux
  • DistroWatch reaches adulthood

    Yes, it was exactly 18 years ago, on 31 May 2001, that DistroWatch was first published. It wasn't quite the comprehensive website covering free operating system that it is today, but it was a start - a single page comparing a dozen Linux distributions in a table format, with major features and package versions. Many of the projects popular in those days, such as Caldera OpenLinux, Corel Linux, Progeny Debian or Libranet GNU/Linux died long time ago, but others, like Slackware Linux, Debian, Red Hat or openSUSE continue to thrive in various forms to this day. If you'd like to see what this website looked like in 2001, please take a look at this snapshot provided by Archive.org.

  • GParted Live 1.0.0-1 Stable Release

    The GParted team is pleased to announce a new stable release of GParted Live.

    This release includes GParted 1.0.0, updated packages, and other improvements.

  • QtFM

    There is a new tool available for Sparkers: QtFM

    [...]

    Lightweight desktop independent Qt file manager for Linux, FreeBSD, NetBSD, OpenBSD and macOS.

Hello Again, Linux

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GNU
Linux

Prior to 2006, I had used only Windows. Around that time, there was a lot of anxiety about its upcoming successor to Windows XP, which at the time was code-named Project Longhorn. My colleagues and I all were dreading it. So, rather than go through all that trouble, I switched to Linux.

However, my first experience with Linux was not great. Although 2006 was The Year of the Linux Desktop (I saw headlines on Digg proclaiming it almost every day), I quickly learned, right after wiping my brand-new laptop's hard drive to make way for Fedora, that maybe it wasn't quite The Year of the Linux Laptop. After a desperate and miserable weekend, I finally got my wireless card working, but that initial trauma left me leery. So, about a year later, when I decided to quit my job and try the digital nomad freelance thing, I bought a MacBook. A day spent hunting down driver files or recompiling my kernel was a day not making money. I needed the assurance and convenience Apple was selling. And it proved a great investment.

During the next decade, I dabbled with Linux. Every year seemed to be The Year of the Linux Desktop—the real one, at last—so on my desktop at work (freelancing wasn't fun for long), I installed Ubuntu, then Debian, then FreeBSD. An article in this journal introduced me to tiling window managers in general and DWM in particular. The first time I felt something like disappointment with my MacBook was after using DWM on Debian for the first time.

Through the years, as my MacBook's hardware failures became increasingly inconvenient, and as my personal preference in software shifted from big beautiful graphical applications to small command-line programs, Linux started to look much more appealing. And, Linux's hardware compatibility had expanded—companies had even started selling laptops with Linux already installed—so I felt reasonably sure I wouldn't need to waste another weekend struggling with a broken wireless connection or risk frying my monitor with a misconfigured Xorg.conf.

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Software Liberty Association Taiwan and Latin American Free Software Installation Festival

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GNU
OSS
  • Open Source Initiative Announces New Partnership with Software Liberty Association Taiwan

    The Open Source Initiative ® (OSI), the global organization working to promote and protect open source, is excited to announce the Affiliate Membership of the Software Liberty Association Taiwan (SLAT). Founded in 2001, SLAT is Taiwan’s first legal entity dedicated to Free and Open Source Software (FOSS), supporting both the development and user communities. As an active community of advocates and technologists, SLAT both drives initiatives, and partners with existing projects, to promote FOSS, including the Open Source Software Application Consulting Center—a program fostering FOSS in Taiwan's schools.

    Critical to both the OSI's and open source projects' success is, as stated in the OSI mission, "building bridges between communities." Both the OSI and SLAT believe those organizations serving Free and Open Source Software communities should seek out ways to support each other—SLAT's Affiliate Membership is an excellent example of such collaboration.

    “We’re thrilled to have SLAT join us in our work to advance Open Source Software and foster open source development,” said Patrick Masson, OSI General Manager. ”SLAT is already doing amazing work throughout Asia, and I hope we can compliment their efforts, and even help expand their good work through other OSI Affiliates. Open Source Software is a world-wide phenomena, so the OSI must commit to working globally.”

  • Flisol 2019 San Cristóbal

    On April 27, 2019, the Latin American Free Software Installation Festival (Flisol) was held in the city of San Cristóbal, Táchira state, Venezuela, the Flisol is an event that takes place simultaneously in many cities of Latin America and Spain, is the largest installation event in the world and is often complemented by talks and workshops.

    In Venezuela at the moment we have had enough problems to be able to organize an event of this type, for which we did not know if we could really do it, everything was decided and things happened a few days before, practically 2 days before we got the headquarters, i’m very happy because we were able to do it in a primary school, the Carlos Rangel Lamus, where his teachers gave us all the support we could need despite the limitations and for that I am deeply grateful, in addition they have two computer labs with GNU / Linux and the doors were open for other events.

5 best Gnome-based Linux distributions to check out

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GNU
Linux
GNOME

Gnome (AKA Gnome 3 or Gnome Shell) is the third iteration of the Gnome desktop environment. Its user-interface is split into a panel at the top, and a favorites dock on the left. Gnome is currently the most popular Linux desktop environment, and most major Linux distributions ship with it as the primary user-interface.

In the Linux world, many people are using Gnome as it is modern, and often the default choice. Even though it remains the most popular desktop on Linux, some Linux OSes do Gnome better than others. So, here are the 5 best Gnome-based Linux OSes to check out!

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