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Microsoft's "Embrace, Extend, and Envelop" of GNU/Linux

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Microsoft

Audio: Going Linux and This Week in Linux (TWIL)

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Linux

Google's GNU/Linux Take and EMUI 9 Review

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Android
GNU
Linux
Google
  • Polish the Chrome

    Using Chromebooks is a bittersweet experience; it feels as if we’re so close to using a successful Linux-based ecosystem, and yet it never comes close to feeling like a fully fledged FOSS solution. In spite (or despite?) of our misgivings about Google Chromebooks, the platform has become a hit – not just in educational circles, but businesses are also picking them up for a number of reasons. Not least their ease of maintenance, low cost, lightweight software footprint and the built-in integration with the flourishing Google ecosystem.
    There are bonuses to running the shared Linux heritage. It has enabled Google to expand the the Chromebook’s basic abilities to running not just Android apps (in a clever containerised system), but now fully fledged desktop Linux software too.

  • EMUI 9 Review [Part 2]: Huawei/Honor’s Android Pie Software Packs a Ton of Useful Features Mistaken for Gimmicks

    Among the various Android forks, Huawei’s EMUI is second only to Samsung’s One UI in terms of customization. There’s a staggering amount of features and pre-installed apps to meet your needs. In part 2 of my EMUI 9 review, I’ll go over all the features and apps that Huawei and Honor offer on their latest smartphones. If you haven’t already checked out part 1 of the review which covers EMUI 9’s Design and Behavioral changes over stock Android 9 Pie, then I recommend you click the link below to read that part.

Best Eye Care Software to Protect Your Eyes in Linux

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Software

It isn’t a secret any longer that long hours of computer screen time leads to several health conditions especially with the eyes e.g. eye strain alone can lead to headaches, and bright light exposure negatively influences sleep patterns.

But since spending time with our computers is inevitable, people have developed software that works to suppress these potential issues and even improve overall health in the process.

This eye care applications protect your eyes by regulating your screen’s display, temperature, and even going as far as setting breaks and exercise routines to keep your sleep and focus levels on track.

Here’s a list of the Best Eye Care Software for Linux users.

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Microsoft Envelopes Linux

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Microsoft

Tilix Terminal Emulator Needs a New Maintainer

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Linux

The Tilix terminal app is a tiling terminal emulator loved by many on the Linux desktop — but is the future of the app in doubt?

Tilix’s current developer, Gerald ‘gnunn1’ Nunn, says he’d prefer to spend more time working on other things that interest him.

Adding more features to an app he considers complete for his needs — most software starts out as a developer scratching their own itch — is becoming more of a chore rather than an exercise in passion.

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Linux Lite Users Are the First to Try Linux Kernel 5.1, Here's How to Install It

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Linux

Linux Lite users are once again among the first to install the latest Linux kernel series on their personal computer, in this case the just released Linux 5.1 kernel.

Linux kernel 5.1 arrived over the weekend as the first major update to the Linux 5.0 kernel series, adding numerous new features and a bunch of improvements. Highlights include preparations for year 2038, configurable Zstd compression levels for the Btrfs file system, as well as support for cumulative patches in live kernel patching.

Additionally, Linux kernel 5.1 introduces the ability to use persistent memory as RAM in addition to the physical memory, support for booting a system to a device-mapper device bypassing initramfs, a new cpuidle governor called TEO (Timer Events Oriented), faster and scalable asynchronous I/O, and better file system monitorization.

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Audio/Video: Full Circle Weekly News, Destination Linux and Xubuntu 19.04 Video Overview

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5 Best Linux Distributions for Gaming

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Gaming

After writing about Steam on Linux in my last article, I’m here with another gaming article for fellow Linux gamers out there. In this article we’re going to have a look at 5 best Linux distributions specially crafted for gaming which you can use for ultimate gaming experience on Linux.

The days are long gone now when gaming on Linux was still a distant dream as gaming on Linux is the real deal now with some amazing developments in recent years. If you search on the web, there are so many gaming distributions out there but Linux distros listed here are highly optimized for gaming as various emulators, gaming software’s and drivers come pre-installed with them. Hence you don’t need to configure Linux to play your favorite games, just install one of these gaming friendly distros and you are ready for fun.

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New ‘Linux App Store’ Website Lets You Find Apps, Wherever

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Linux

A brand new website makes it easier to find Linux apps, regardless of their packaging format or app store host.

The broadly named “Linux App Store” is a free, online hub where you can search for applications by name to check whether they’re available on the Snapcraft Store, the Flathub website, or the AppImage directory.

Why?

Because searching all three stores separately is a heck of a hassle! Ubuntu, for instance, only shows repo apps and snaps in Ubuntu Software on the desktop, whereas the GNOME Software app on Fedora only shows repo apps and Flathub results.

This online store cuts through that to show all apps, from any source.

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More in Tux Machines

Graphics: Red Hat's Wayland Agenda and AMD Begins Queueing Graphics Driver Changes For The Linux 5.3 Kernel

  • Hans de Goede: Wayland itches summary
    1. Middle click on title / header bar to lower the Window does not work for native apps. Multiple people have reported this issue to me. A similar issue was fixed for not being able to raise Windows. It should be easy to apply a similar fix for the lowering problem. There are bugs open for this here, here and here. 2. Running graphical apps via sudo or pxexec does not work. There are numerous examples of apps breaking because of this, such as lshw-gui and usbivew. At least for X11 apps this is not that hard to fix. But sofar this has deliberately not been fixed. The reasoning behind this is described in this bug. I agree with the reasoning behind this, but I think it is not pragmatic to immediately disallow all GUI apps to connect when run as root starting today.
  • Hans de Goede: Better support for running games under Wayland (with GNOME3/mutter as compositor)
    First of all I do not want people to get their hopes up about $subject of this blogpost. Improving gaming support is a subjects which holds my personal interest and it is an issue I plan to spend time on trying to improve. But this will take a lot of time (think months for simple things, years for more complex things).
  • AMD Begins Queueing Graphics Driver Changes For The Linux 5.3 Kernel
    Being past the Linux 5.2 kernel merge window, AMD's open-source Linux graphics driver developers have already begun queuing changes anticipated for Linux 5.3 via a work-in-progress tree. Given the short time that this 5.3 WIP tree has been around, there isn't too much exciting about the changes -- yet. But surely over the weeks ahead it will get interesting. Making things particularly interesting is that we are expecting initial Navi support to make it for Linux 5.3... In recent weeks AMD began pushing AMDGPU LLVM compiler back-end changes for GFX10/Navi and we expect the AMDGPU DRM kernel driver enablement to come for Linux 5.3. Linux 5.3 will already be arriving after the rumored release of the first Navi graphics cards so having to wait past 5.3 for mainline support would already be tragic. But given the recent LLVM activity, we expect AMD to push out the Navi kernel driver changes soon. For that likely massive patch-set to be reviewed in time, the Navi patches would need to make their debut within the next few weeks.

today's howtos and programming

Fedora 30 Workstation review - Smarter, faster and buggier

Fedora 30 is definitely one of the more interesting releases of this family in a long-time. It brings significant changes, including solid improvements in the desktop performance and responsiveness. Over the years, Fedora went from no proprietary stuff whatsoever to slowly acknowledging the modern needs of computing, so now it gives you MP3 codecs and you can install graphics drivers and such. Reasonable looks, plus good functionality across the board. However, there were tons of issues, too. Printing to Samba, video screenshot bug, installer cropped-image slides, package management complications, mouse cursor lag, oopses, average battery life, and inadequate usability out of the box. You need to change the defaults to have a desktop that can be used in a quick, efficient way without remembering a dozen nerdy keyboard shortcuts. All in all, I like the freshness. In general, it would seem the Linux desktop is seeing a cautious revival, and Fedora's definitely a happy player. But there are too many rough edges. Well, we got performance tweaks after so many years, and codecs, we might get window buttons and desktop icons one day back, too. Something like 6/10, and definitely worth exploring. I am happy enough to do two more tests. I will run an in-vivo upgrade on the F29 instance on this same box, and then also test the distro on an old Nvidia-powered laptop, which will showcase both the support for proprietary graphics (didn't work the last time) and performance improvements, if they scale for old hardware, too. That's all for now. Read more

Events: Automotive at LF, Linux Clusters Institute, Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC)

  • Automotive Linux Summit and Open Source Summit Japan Keynote Speakers and Schedule Announced
    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source has announced the speaker line up for Open Source Summit Japan and Automotive Linux Summit. One registration provides access to all content at both events, which will be held July 17-19 at the Toranomon Hills Forum in Tokyo. Open Source Summit Japan (OSSJ) and Automotive Linux Summit (ALS) will bring together top talent from companies on the leading edge of innovation including Toyota Motor Corporation, Uber, Intel, Sony, Google, Microsoft and more. Talks will cover a range of topics, with ALS talks on everything from infrastructure and hardware to compliance and security; and OSSJ sessions on AI, Linux systems, cloud infrastructure, cloud native applications, open networking, edge computing, safety and security and open source best practices.
  • Register Now for the 2019 Introductory Linux Clusters Institute Workshop
    Registration is now open for the 2019 Linux Clusters Institute (LCI) Introductory Workshop,which will be held August 19-23, 2019 at the Rutgers University Inn & Conference Center in New Brunswick, NJ. This workshop will cover the fundamentals of setting up and administering a high-performance computing (HPC) cluster and will be led by leading HPC experts.
  • Additional early bird slots available for LPC 2019
    The Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC) registration web site has been showing “sold out” recently because the cap on early bird registrations was reached. We are happy to report that we have reviewed the registration numbers for this year’s conference and were able to open more early bird registration slots. Beyond that, regular registration will open July 1st. Please note that speakers and microconference runners get free passes to LPC, as do some microconference presenters, so that may be another way to attend the conference. Time is running out for new refereed-track and microconference proposals, so visit the CFP page soon. Topics for accepted microconferences are welcome as well.