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GNU

Linux as an alternative to the world's biggest operating system

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GNU
Linux

Ubuntu has the biggest range of interfaces with names such as Unity Desktop, Kubuntu, KDE, Lubuntu and UbuntuGnome. However, most of these interfaces can be downloaded and installed into other distributions. "Beginners often feel more comfortable when the interface is similar to Windows," says Georg Esser. Two of those distributions are KDE and Cinnamon.

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RS Components, Allied Electronics Open Order Books for Red Pitaya

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Development
GNU
Linux

Based on the GNU/Linux operating system, Red Pitaya can be programmed at different levels using a variety of software interfaces, including: HDL, C/C++, and scripting languages. HTML-based web interfaces enable access to Red Pitaya's functionality in most Web browsers from a smartphone, tablet or personal computer.

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SteamOS Has Received Support For Third Party Controllers

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GNU
Linux
Debian
Gaming

Also, the system compositor has been updated, the system being capable to recognize many more third party controllers.

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I am working exclusively from a Chromebook -- here's how and why

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GNU
Linux
Google

Despite that I've owned an HP 11 Chromebook since its release, I've viewed it as little more than a novelty. I work from an office on the third floor of my home, which has a nice size desk, desktop PC and 15.6 inch laptop, both running Windows 8.1.

However, as the weather warms (finally!) I considered making the move out to my porch, something I did last summer as well. In that case I lugged the Windows laptop with me, not a difficult task, but the size is really more than I need for carrying around.

This time I elected to give the HP 11 a shot, as it's light and easy to carry. The only question was "how will I do my job?"

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Keep current with what's new in Linux distributions

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GNU
Linux

On the one-hand "Linux" is well-understood; on the other, there is a rich variety of Linux distributions available. How do they differ and what's new in each release?
The term Linux is understood to be a popular open-source operating system. Technically, Linux is the kernel - the heart of the operating system which provides boot capabilities, interacts with hardware and makes a file system and applications available. It is the accompanying wide suite of similarly free and open source software that turns the kernel into something that home and business users alike can use as a productivity or entertainment platform. It is these combinations of kernel, bundled applications and configuration defaults that make up what we know as Linux distributions or distros.

Theoretically, Linux is Linux, with any Linux distribution equally able to run the same applications and be reconfigured. However, each Linux distribution has its own r'aison d'etre, its own purpose for existing, its own target market.

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Create a game with Scratch on Raspberry Pi

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GNU
Linux
Gaming
HowTos

While Scratch may seem like a very simplistic programming language that’s just for kids, you’d be wrong to overlook it as an excellent first step into coding for all age levels. One aspect of learning to code is understanding the underlying logic that makes up all programs; comparing two systems, learning to work with loops and general decision-making within the code.

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Did Blue Pup jump the shark with its Windows 8 Metro interface?

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

When Windows 8 was first released many people were shocked and even horrified by the garish Metro interface. Some even left Windows for Linux or shifted back to Windows 7. Now you can experience some of the...er...magic of the Metro interface in the Blue Pup distro (a Puppy Linux spin), according to LinuxInsider.

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Linux Becoming a ‘First Class Member’ of the Unreal Engine Family

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GNU
Linux
Gaming

Unreal Engine developers Epic Games hope to make Linux a “first class member” of the Unreal Engine family for both gamers and developers.

While Unreal Tournament’s return to Linux was good news for gamers, developers could’ve been left with subpar tooling that would make it harder for indie developers and large game studios alike to justify the effort to adapt their complex workflows to our favourite OS.

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Netrunner 14 RC1 Is Based on Kubuntu 14.04 LTS, but It Looks Much Better

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GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

Netrunner 14 RC1, a GNU/Linux distribution based on Kubuntu 14.04 LTS, featuring KDE as the default desktop environment and integrating many GNOME/GTK+ programs to make it Ubuntu-compatible, has been released and is now available for testing.

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Browsers will Flash Linux into the future or drag it into the past

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GNU
Linux
Software

The announcement has gone out. The gist? Flash will no longer work with Chromium on Linux. Many of you are probably wondering, "What is Chromium?" Essentially, Chromium is the open-source version of Google's massively popular browser, Chrome. The big Flash debacle is simple: the old way of handling Flash (within a browser) is insecure. It was driven by the Netscape Plugin API (NPAPI) -- an architecture that dates back to Netscape Navigator 2.0. NPAI that's insecure, obsolete, and doesn't work well on smartphones and tablets -- which is a death knell in and of itself.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

  • Red Hat: Creativity is risky (and other truths open leaders need to hear)
    Leaders are all too aware of the importance of invention and innovation. Today, the health and wealth of their businesses have become increasingly dependent on the creation of new products and processes. In the digital age especially, competition is more fierce than ever as global markets open and expand. Just keeping pace with change requires a focus on constant improvement and consistent learning. And that says nothing about building for tomorrow.
  • APAC Financial Services Institutions Bank on Red Hat to Enhance Agility
  • APAC banks aim to use open source to enhance agility
  • Huawei CloudFabric Supports Container Network Deployment Automation, Improving Enterprise Service Agility
    At HUAWEI CONNECT 2018, Huawei announced that its CloudFabric Cloud Data Center Solution supports container network deployment automation and will be available for the industry-leading enterprise Kubernetes platform via a new plug-in.
  • Redis Labs Integrates With Red Hat OpenShift, Hits 1B Milestone
    Redis Labs is integrating its enterprise platform as a hosted and managed database service on Red Hat’s OpenShift Container Platform. That integration includes built-in support for Red Hat’s recently launched Kubernetes Operator. The Redis Enterprise integration will allow customers to deploy and manage Redis databases as a stateful Kubernetes service. It will also allow users to run Redis Enterprise on premises or across any cloud environment.
  • Needham & Company Starts Red Hat (RHT) at Buy
  • Fedora Toolbox — Hacking on Fedora Silverblue
    Fedora Silverblue is a modern and graphical operating system targetted at laptops, tablets and desktop computers. It is the next-generation Fedora Workstation that promises painless upgrades, clear separation between the OS and applications, and secure and cross-platform applications. The basic operating system is an immutable OSTree image, and all the applications are Flatpaks. It’s great! However, if you are a hacker and decide to set up a development environment, you immediately run into the immutable OS image and the absence of dnf. You can’t install your favourite tools, editors and SDKs the way you’d normally do on Fedora Workstation. You can either unlock your immutable OS image to install RPMs through rpm-ostree and give up the benefit of painless upgrades; or create a Docker container to get an RPM-based toolbox but be prepared to mess around with root permissions and having to figure out why your SSH agent or display server isn’t working.
  • Fedora 28 : Alien, Steam and Fedora distro.

Raspberry Pi: Hands-on with the updated Raspbian Linux

wrote last week about the new Raspbian Linux release, but in that post I was mostly concerned with the disappearance of the Wolfram (and Mathematica) packages, and I didn't really do justice to the release itself. So now I have continued with installing or upgrading it on all of my Raspberry Pi systems, and this post will concentrate on the process and results from that. First, the new ISO images are available from the Raspberry Pi Downloads page (as always), and the Release Notes have been added to the usual text document. I have only downloaded the plain Raspbian images, I don't bother with the NOOBS images much any more - but the new ISO is included in those as well of course. Please note that the SHA-256 checksum for the images is given on the web page, so be sure to verify that before you continue with the file that you downloaded. If you prefer stronger (or weaker) verification, you can find a PGP signature (and an SHA-1 checksum) on the Raspbian images download page. Read more

Ubuntu: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Release, Official Ubuntu 18.10 T-Shirt and Pop!_OS 18.10 Release

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 550
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 550
    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 550 for the week of October 14 – 20, 2018.
  • Ubuntu 18.10 is a Cosmic Cuttlefish of new Linux loveliness
    CANONICAL HAS announced the release of its bi-annual update to the Ubuntu operating system. Ubuntu 18.10, aka Cosmic Cuttlefish, is out now. It's not a long-term version so this is more aimed at individual users, as companies prefer to wait for an LTS to commit. So what's new in this build? Well, one of the biggest bugbears - graphics driver updating - has been addressed, so there'll be no more of all that sideloading the updates nonsense. Canonical has confirmed that this simpler process will get a graphical clicky interface, but not until (probably) version 19.x. But in the meantime, the way Ubuntu uses RAM for graphics has been given a kicking and should be a lot more efficient for migrating gamers.
  • Ubuntu 18.10 Cosmic Cuttlefish is now ready to download
    It’s October which means that we were due an Ubuntu release and Canonical hasn’t failed us this time around. Starting now, users who want to download Ubuntu 18.10 Cosmic Cuttlefish can do so. The latest version of the popular Linux distribution is only supported for nine months, until July 2019, with it being an inter-LTS release, therefore, you may want to consider sticking with Ubuntu 18.04 LTS on your mission-critical systems. Ubuntu 18.10 is no small release; out-of-the-box users will be greeted with a new theme dubbed Yaru and a new icon theme called Suru. It marks the first time that the distribution has received a significant overhaul since Ubuntu 10.10 when Canonical, the firm that makes Ubuntu, decided to throw out the brown colour scheme in favour of the purple, orange, and black theme we’re all now so used to.
  • You Can Now Buy an Official Ubuntu 18.10 T-Shirt
    The reverse of each 100% cotton tee bears the Ubuntu brand mark and text that reads “Cosmic Cuttlefish 18.10”. The shirt is both unisex and available in sizes small through quad XL. This should ensure there’s a comfy fit for virtually everyone (though, alas, not me – I’m an XS, and “small” is just too dang big). As well as making a great xmas gift idea an Ubuntu-loving loved one, the shirt is also a novel way to communicate your computing preferences to the wider world as you go about your shopping in Walmart, or as a certified conversation starter at tech conferences.
  • System76 releases Ubuntu-based Pop!_OS 18.10 Linux distribution
    System76 is making huge moves lately. The company used to just sell re-branded computers running Ubuntu, and while there was nothing wrong with that, it has much more lofty goals. You see, it released its own Ubuntu-based operating system called "Pop!_OS," and now, it is preparing to release its own self-designed and built open source computers. In other words, much like Apple, System76 is maintaining both the software and hardware aspects of the customer experience. While its new hardware is not yet available, the latest version of its operating system is. Following the release of Ubuntu 18.10, Pop!_OS 18.10 is now available for download. While it is based on Ubuntu, it is not merely Canonical's operating system with System76 branding and artwork. Actually, there are some significant customizations that make Pop!_OS its own.

Programming: Bugs, Mistakes, and Python

  • Living on the command line: Why mistakes are a good thing
  • Getting started with functional programming in Python using the toolz library
    In the second of a two-part series, we continue to explore how we can import ideas from functional programming methodology into Python to have the best of both worlds. In the previous post, we covered immutable data structures. Those allow us to write "pure" functions, or functions that have no side effects, merely accepting some arguments and returning a result while maintaining decent performance.
  • The code's crashed again, but why? Tell us your war stories of bugs found – and bugs fixed
    Even the best software goes wrong from time to time. So, what exactly happens when it throws a wobbly, especially when it's a key component in a production environment? Whether it's a total crash, a transaction failure, or the mangling of important data, there's going to be some kind of business impact. And the more the problem persists, the greater the level of pain, loss, and disruption. Everyone wants faults identified, diagnosed, and fixed ASAP. Identification is not normally a challenge – user complaints, curses, screams, and threats usually provide a pretty good clue. But before anyone can prioritize and schedule a fix, someone needs to diagnose the problem.