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HP’s ‘The Machine’ & the Future of Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

If all goes according to plan, in June of 2015 HP plans to release a new operating system they’re calling Linux++. Before we start jumping up and down and putting on our party hats, we should know that this is not a new Linux distro being designed by HP to be featured on a new line of laptops. Although based on Linux and Android, this won’t even be an operating system at all in the sense that mortals such as I generally use the term. Most of us won’t be downloading and installing it. If we do, we won’t be using it as a drop-in replacement for Mint, Fedora or any of our other favorite desktop distros.

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Linux Mint 17.1 "Rebecca" with KDE and Xfce Could Arrive Early 2015

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux

Linux Mint 17.1 "Rebecca" release was a great success and many users have already upgraded to the new release, but there are other flavors that are also being worked on and they are very close to the final version.

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Highest Performance ARM Desktop Ever

Filed under
GNU
Linux

That’s the claim CompuLab (the folks who gave us TrimSlice) makes about their Utilite2 device. I think they are very close to being truthful. Performance is not just about the network, the CPU, the graphics, and RAM. It’s about how it all works together. TrimSlice has a winner every way except in RAM. These days, 2gB is limiting, even for browsing the web. Modern browsers like FireFox and Chrome cache so much stuff and Chrome preloads pages that a user might click, that the browser takes all available RAM and performance drops off in 2gB. On my system, with 4gB RAM and hundreds of processes, Chrome is taking gigabytes of virtual memory and sometimes causes swapping if I have a dozen pages open.

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Tanglu 2 (Bartholomea annulata) released!

Filed under
GNU
Linux

We are glad to announce the availability of the second release of Tanglu, codename "Bartholomea".

This release contains a large amount of updated packages, and ships with the latest release of KDE 4 and GNOME.

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GCC Has Been Ported To The Visium Architecture

Filed under
Development
GNU

Never heard of Visium before? Neither have we, but it's yet another platform where GCC can serve as the code compiler. Eric Botcazou of AdaCore explained Visium as "a 32-bit RISC architecture with an Extended Arithmetic Module implementing some 64-bit operations and an FPU designed for embedded systems...The Visium is a classic 32-bit RISC architecture whose branches have a delay slot and whose arithmetic and logical instructions all set the flags, and they comprise the moves between GP registers (which are inclusive ORs under the hood in the traditional RISC fashion)."

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Linux Continues to Grow in the Cloud Computing and Implementation of Enterprise Applications

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The operating system of most famous open source is gaining ground in business particularly in cloud computing, according to a report from the Linux Foundation and Yeoman Technology Group.

The Linux Foundation has published a study called “2014 Enterprise End User Trends Report” that shows the steady growth of Linux in the market for large companies, especially in recent years driven by factors such as the growth of cloud computing, in addition to its known qualities in terms of safety, capacity deployment, costs or virtualization.

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Must-have Linux desktop apps (Six Clicks)

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GNU
Linux
Software

There's nothing I can't do on my Linux PCs that requires Windows. It's really that simple.

On my Linux Mint 17.1 desktop, I can run Windows games, thanks to Crossover, and run thousands of native games including many Steam-powered games. In addition, I don't need to worry about anti-virus software since, despite all the FUD, there still hasn't been a successful desktop Linux virus.

Let's get down to business: Here are the six applications I use every day to get my work done and keep in touch with my friends. Unless you have some particular program that's Windows only, I think you'll find these six programs may answer for all your daily needs as well.

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Has The Russian Government Moved To GNU/Linux As Planned?

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GNU
Linux

There is another plan which almost certainly will involve replacing Wintel PCs with GNU/Linux PCs gradually, by a million units per annum, the move to Baikal processors, a derivative of ARM. Recently, in response to sanctions over Ukraine, Russia will officially prefer home-grown “solutions” for IT. There are signs of a digital “cold” war emerging and the world’s IT is dependent on several components originating in Russia. Such pressures will surely accelerate migration to GNU/Linux in Russia. It’s a short cut to independence.

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HP's Big Slap-In-The-Face To Microsoft Will Show Up Next Year

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The operating system is called Linux++, and is part of HP's ambitious project to reinvent the computer, reports MIT Technology Review's Tom Simonite.

Ultimately, HP hopes to replace Linux++ with something even more radical and homegrown, an operating system called Carbon, though it hasn’t talked about a timeline for that yet.

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The Best Terminal Emulators for Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

If you’re a fan of Linux, you know the exact reason why it’s awesome – the command line. Though many outsiders view it as only a “hacker tool,” it’s actually one of the best tools available for any operating system. The Linux shell has the ability to install software, manage your operating system and basically everything else.

To interact with the command line, you’ll need a terminal emulator. There are many terminal emulators available – perhaps too many. There are a lot of good ones and a lot of bad ones out there. It is because of this reason we’ve decided to create a list of five great terminal emulators available on Linux.

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More in Tux Machines

SUSE and Fedora Leftovers

  • Introducing SUSE Enterprise Storage 6
    SUSE Enterprise Storage 6 enables IT organizations to seamlessly adapt to changing business demands while reducing IT operational expense by transforming their enterprise storage infrastructure with our intelligent software-defined storage solution. Based on the Ceph Nautilus release and built on SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 15 SP1, SUSE Enterprise Storage 6 enables IT organizations to seamlessly adapt to changing business demands while reducing IT operational expense with new features focused on containerized and cloud workload support, improved integration with public cloud, and enhanced data protection capabilities
  • Introducing Fedora Summer Coding Class of Summer 2019
    Starting today, interns from the Fedora Summer Coding (F.S.C.) class of Summer 2019 start working on their projects. Three interns selected for Outreachy begin today, and another five interns selected for Google Summer of Code begin on Monday, May 27. The Fedora CommOps and Diversity and Inclusion teams worked together to interview all eight interns. This week on the Fedora Community Blog, we’ll introduce two interns each day of this week!
  • Getting set up with Fedora Project services
    In addition to providing an operating system, the Fedora Project provides numerous services for users and developers. Services such as Ask Fedora, the Fedora Project Wiki and the Fedora Project Mailing Lists provide users with valuable resources for learning how to best take advantage of Fedora. For developers of Fedora, there are many other services such as dist-git, Pagure, Bodhi, COPR and Bugzilla that are involved with the packaging and release process. These services are available for use with a free account from the Fedora Accounts System (FAS). This account is the passport to all things Fedora! This article covers how to get set up with an account and configure Fedora Workstation for browser single sign-on.

Kernel: Ted Tso is Switching to Hugo, Linux's vmalloc Seeing "Large Performance Benefits" With 5.2 Kernel Changes

  • Ted Tso: Switching to Hugo
    With the demise of Google+, I’ve decided to try to resurrect my blog. Previously, I was using Wordpress, but I’ve decided that it’s just too risky from a security perspective. So I’ve decided my blog over to Hugo. A consequence of this switch is that all of the Wordpress comments have been dropped, at least for now.
  • Linux's vmalloc Seeing "Large Performance Benefits" With 5.2 Kernel Changes
    On top of all the changes queued for Linux 5.2 is an interesting last-minute performance improvement for the vmalloc code. The Linux kernel's vmalloc code has the potential of performing much faster on Linux 5.2, particularly with embedded devices. Vmalloc is used for allocating contiguous memory in the virtual address space and saw a nice optimization merged today on the expected final day of the Linux 5.2 merge window.

Security: CBS FUD, .NET Push and Intel Disaster Due to Defects

  • Security researchers discover Linux version of Winnti malware [Ed: This targets already-vulnerable servers and GNU/Linux has little to do with that. It can be proprietary software on top of it.]
    Chronicle says it discovered this Linux variant after news broke last month that Bayer, one of the world's largest pharmaceutical companies, had been hit by Chinese hackers, and the Winnti malware was discovered on its systems.
  • Microsoft's Attack Surface Analyzer now works on Macs and Linux, too [Ed: Microsoft is now pushing .NET in the name of "security"]
  • Intel Loses 5X More Average Performance Than AMD From Mitigations: Report
    Intel has published its own set of benchmark results for the mitigations to the latest round of vulnerabilities, but Phoronix, a publication that focuses on Linux-related news and reviews, has conducted its own testing and found a significant impact. Phoronix's recent testing of all mitigations in Linux found the fixes reduce Intel's performance by 16% (on average) with Hyper-Threading enabled, while AMD only suffers a 3% average loss. Phoronix derived these percentages from the geometric mean of test results from its entire test suite. From a performance perspective, the overhead of the mitigations narrow the gap between Intel and AMD's processors. Intel's chips can suffer even more with Hyper-Threading (HT) disabled, a measure that some companies (such as Apple and Google) say is the only way to make Intel processors completely safe from the latest vulnerabilities. In some of Phoronix's testing, disabling HT reduced performance almost 50%. The difference was not that great in many cases, but the gap did widen in almost every test by at least a few points.

Licensing: Companies That Close Down FOSS 'in the Cloud' and Latest GPL Compliance at OnePlus

  • Confluent says it has the first cloud-native Kafka streaming platform
    Open-source unicorn Confluent Inc. is ready to go head-to-head with cloud computing giants with the release of a cloud-native and fully managed service based upon the Apache Kafka streaming platform.
  • For open source vs. proprietary, AWS might have it both ways [Ed: Mac Asay, Adobe, proponent of calling proprietary "open". IDG has just received money from Adobe (“BrandPost Sponsored by Adobe”) and Asay is now publishing articles owing to his employer paying the media. He’s is some kind of editor at InfoWorld (IDG). So the corporations basically buy ‘journalism’ (their staff as editors) at IDG.]
  • Why Open Source Should Remain Open
    On one hand, the validation that comes along with major tech players offering open source fuels growth in the software. On the other, it also changes the platform from one that’s always been free and available to one that is only available with limitations and has red tape all around it. As some of these companies join in the open source community, they’re losing sight of the original goal and community. Instead, they are building artificial walls and shutting down many parts of what makes open source open. This isn’t a unique occurrence, it’s happening more and more frequently and is something that will completely rearrange the core of open source as we know it.
  • BREAKING: OnePlus 7 Pro root achieved on global and Indian variants, kernel source codes released
    OnePlus phones are known for their developer friendliness as well as strong aftermarket development community. The Chinese OEM prefers to mandate GPL and push kernel source codes in a timely manner, which is a godsend compared to most of their competitors.
  • OnePlus 7 / 7 Pro kernel source code is now out, expect custom ROMs soon
    OnePlus announced the most-awaited OnePlus 7 and OnePlus 7 Pro last week. Both the smartphones are already on sale and can be bought in all the countries they are available. Even the OnePlus 7 Pro received its maiden update which brings April security patch and more. As usual, the kernel source for the OnePlus 7 series is now out too in a timely manner. Thus, users can expect custom ROMS sooner than later.