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Linux for Seniors 101

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

She was on her computer at home doing something or the other when suddenly things went bad for her. The menu bar and the task bar disappeared, including the “Start” button and she couldn’t close or change anything on her screen. In a panic, she called friends to try to see if she could get guidance to fix it. One friend told her that the same thing had happened to her and it turned out to be a virus. Olivia was told to turn her computer off immediately and reinstall Windows. That was the only way to proceed.

All of her family pictures and all of her files…gone. She and her friend reinstalled Windows and spent the next two days getting her computer back into shape.

When I was giving the keyboard shortcut portion of the class, I noticed Olivia holding her hands over her mouth as her eyes grew wide. I thought she was going to cry. It turns out that Olivia had accidentally hit the F11 key while she was typing. She had no controls, no cues or hints as to how to get her computer screen back to normal. She had no idea she had accidentally hit the F11 key or that hitting it again would return things to normal. When she discovered how easy this was to fix she was both relieved and angry. She even left her seat to come forward and give me a hug as she recounted the story.

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Manjaro 0.8.9 Released – A Ultimate Linux OS with Windows Feel, Review and Installation Guide

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Manjaro Gnu/Linux is a Unix Like Operating System which is Arch Linux Based. This desktop oriented Distribution has desktop environment Xfce by default and any other desktop environment can be installed and configured later.

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Steam Hardware Survey Changes, Now Split Per-Platform

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

So, to look back on January Linux was actually on 1.34%, not 1.11%!

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The Ivorian Adventure of Jerry and Emma

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Before Emma, the JerryClan-Ivory Coast had flirted with Ubuntu, but that was before encountering the beautiful EmmaBuntus distribution.

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Windows XP User? Here’s 4 Reasons to Switch to Lubuntu This April

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Support for Windows XP officially ends on April 8, 2014. After this date Microsoft will no longer issues security updates, patch exploits or provide any other means of official, direct support to its users

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Linux Mint Debian 201403 RC released!

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

We look forward to receiving your feedback. Thank you for using Linux Mint and have a lot of fun testing the release candidate!

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30 Big Companies and Devices Running on GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gadgets

Linux is a most popular Operating System compared to Windows and Mac. Linux is everywhere even at those places where most of us have not even thought. Tiny machines to Gaint Supercomputers are powered by Linux. Linux no more remains a Geeky thing.

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Linux Ebb & Flow, Red Hat Oops, and Chakra Reviewed

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Red Hat

There's rarely a dull moment when looking through Linux newsfeeds. Today we find Jesse Smith has reviewed Chakra GNU/Linux 2014.02. LinuxInsider.com looks at why distributions gain popularity then disappear. And finally, The Register covers a bit of convention confusion between Red Hat and cloud newcomer Piston.

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Linux Web Usage Almost Doubled, Now At ~2%?

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Chitika, a former advertiser on Phoronix, has issued a new report about Chrome OS and Linux web usage growth from September 2013 through January 2014. Chitika found that the number of Chrome OS devices rose from 0.1 to 0.2% of all accounted web traffic by the network. Meanwhile, for Linux devices in general, they found Linux rose from 1.1% last September to now at 1.9% when ending their numbers at the end of January. The Linux growth really took off in October has continued since.

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On my new laptop: ZaReason's Strata 7440

Filed under
GNU
Linux
PCLOS
MDV

Getting Mageia 4 on the laptop was no big deal. In fact, I used the 64 bit version of the OS and everything worked, even the Japanese IME with iBus.

Then I tried to get PCLinuxOS and, unfortunately, had problems with the display. I need to see if I can get to correct the problem later.

The other OS that I installed to the Strata was OpenMandriva 2013. The only problem was the lack of Wifi connectivity... It was solved easily adding the appropriate packages.

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More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu-Based ExTiX Distro, the Ultimate Linux System, Updates Its Deepin Edition

Based on the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system, the ExTiX 18.4 Deepin Edition is now available and it ships updated components, including the latest Deepin 15.5 Desktop, the Calamares 3.1.12 universal installer framework, and a custom Linux 4.16.2 kernel with extra hardware support. "I’ve made a new extra version of ExTiX with Deepin 15.5 Desktop (made in China!)," said Arne Exton in the release announcement. "Only a minimum of packages is installed in ExTiX Deepin. You can, of course, install all the packages you want, even while running ExTiX Deepin live, i.e. from a DVD or USB stick." Read more

Stable kernels 4.16.4, 4.14.36, 4.9.96, 4.4.129 and 3.18.106

Things You Should Know About Ubuntu 18.04

This article answers frequently asked questions about Ubuntu 18.04 and thus informing you of the important things you should know about Ubuntu 18.04. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Discovery of Terminal app for Chrome OS suggests future support for Linux software
    Chrome OS is a fairly flexible operating system, and its support for Android apps via the Google Play Store opens up a world of software. It has been thought -- and hoped -- for some time that Linux support might be on its way, and this is looking increasingly likely. A Terminal app has appeared in the Chrome OS dev channel, strongly suggesting that support for Linux applications could well be on the horizon -- something which will give Chromebooks a new appeal.
  • Put Wind into your Deployments with Kubernetes and Helm
    I’m a Software Engineer. Every day, I come into work and write code. That’s what I’m paid to do. As I write my code, I need to be confident that it’s of the highest quality. I can test it locally, but anyone who’s ever heard the words, “...but it works on my machine,” knows that’s not enough. There are huge differences between my local environment and my company’s production systems, both in terms of scale and integration with other components. Back in the day, production systems were complex, and setting them up required a deep knowledge of the underlying systems and infrastructure. To get a production-like environment to test my code, I would have to open a ticket with my IT department and wait for them to get to it and provision a new server (whether physical or virtual). This was a process that took a few days at best. That used to be OK when release cycles were several months apart. Today, it’s completely unacceptable.
  • KDE Plasma 5.13 Desktop Environment Promises Much Better Wayland Support
    The adoption of the next-generation Wayland display server amongst Linux-based operating systems is slowly, but surely, changing the Linux world for better. While most of the popular GNU/Linux distributions out there are shy on adopting Wayland by default, major Linux desktop environments like GNOME and KDE continue to offer improved Wayland support with each new major release. KDE Plasma 5.13 is being worked on these days, and KDE developer Roman Gilg reported over the weekend on the progress, so far, on the Plasma Wayland component for the next major release, which looks to be pretty promising. One of the most significant changes implemented in Plasma Wayland for KDE Plasma 5.13 is the ability to run more Linux apps on the Wayland display manager, either as native Wayland clients or as Xwayland clients.
  • [Mageia] Weekly Roundup 2018 – Week 16
    Work on the LXQt packages is still ongoing; watch this space for Great Plasma Update news.
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 524
  • Is English Wikipedia’s ‘rise and decline’ typical?
    The figure comes from “The Rise and Decline of an Open Collaboration System,” a well-known 2013 paper that argued that Wikipedia’s transition from rapid growth to slow decline in 2007 was driven by an increase in quality control systems. Although many people have treated the paper’s finding as representative of broader patterns in online communities, Wikipedia is a very unusual community in many respects. Do other online communities follow Wikipedia’s pattern of rise and decline? Does increased use of quality control systems coincide with community decline elsewhere?
  • Two DMV Startups Are Updating an Open Source Security System to Prevent Data Hacks
  • Comprehensive Android Binary Scans Find Known Security Vulnerabilities in 1 Out of Every 5 of the 700 Most Popular Apps on Google Play Store [Ed: Insignary is again badmouthing FOSS platforms as a form of marketing that's basically disguised as 'research' or 'study']
  • Ryzen Stability Issues Are Still Affecting Some FreeBSD Users
    While in recent months there have been some improvements to FreeBSD that have helped yield greater reliability in running AMD Ryzen processors on this BSD operating system, some users are still reporting hard to diagnose stability problems on FreeBSD. For some, FreeBSD on Ryzen is still leading to lock-ups, even while the system may be idle. Also making it hard to debug, for some they can trigger a lock-up within an hour of booting their system while for others they may be able to make it a week or two before hitting any stability problem.
  • 6 DevOps trends to watch in 2018
    Here at Loggly, we live and breathe logs and uncovering underlying data. It probably comes as no surprise that we’re passionate about the future of log analysis and metric monitoring. Communicating with key subject matter experts in the DevOps space plays an important role in helping us understand where the industry is headed.
  • Trouble in techno hippie paradise
    Another interesting point: while the number of people addicted to nicotine has been going down globally lately, the number of network addicts has outnumbered those by far now. And yet the long term effects of being online almost 24/365 have not yet been researched at all. The cigarette companies claimed that most doctors smoke. The IT industry claims it's normal to be online. What's your wakeup2smartphone time? Do you check email every day?