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Top Linux Myths Dispelled

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Over the years, we've heard from countless Microsoft Windows fans as to why they believe using Linux was nearly impossible. These folks would cite everything – from poor hardware compatibility to a lack of popular software. And I suppose at one time, some aspects of this were true.

But in 2014 when people still claim that using newbie friendly distributions like Ubuntu are too difficult, this nonsense needs to be put to rest once and for all. This article is but a small step in what I hope will be a wake up call for naysayers.

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Achieving a technological state of independence is harder than you think

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Jon ‘maddog’ Hall, President of Project Cauã and Executive Director of Linux International has called for countries to maintain technological independence by taking ownership of network construction and maintenance.

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Interview with GNU remotecontrol

Filed under
GNU
Interviews

GNU remotecontrol is a web application serving as a management tool for reading from and writing to multiple IP enabled heating, ventilation, air conditioning (HVAC) thermostats, and other building automation devices. While various IP thermostat manufacturers have offered web portals exclusively for their users to remotely access and adjust the settings of individual thermostats, they do not provide a unified management tool for multiple thermostats. The goal of GNU remotecontrol is to provide this management tool for individuals and companies alike.

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OpenELEC 4.2 Beta 6 Is a Bleeding Edge Distro That Runs on Almost Anything

Filed under
GNU
Linux

OpenELEC, an embedded operating system built specifically to run XBMC, the open source entertainment media hub, has been upgraded to version 4.2 Beta 6.

The OpenELEC developers are not staying idly by and now they've released a new version of their system, although it looks like they are no longer closely following the XBMC launches. Until now, the two seemed to be linked, at least in terms of releases, but XBMC already has a stable version out and OpenELEC is not following.

On the other hand, XBMC is actually just a media hub and OpenELEC is an operating system, which is much more complex. It needs a lot more adjusting and there are numerous packages that need to be upgraded, fixed, and added.

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The personality of a Linux-loving teen

Filed under
GNU
Linux

A few years ago a middle school student walked up to me and offered to help me refurbish computers with Linux to deliver to students who don't have a computer to use at home. (I've been doing that kind of digital divide work for a while.) When I saw how much he already knew, I asked him, "Did one of your parents or relatives introduce you to Linux?” He replied, “No, I taught myself a lot of open source things from the web. It's something I'm interested in."

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5 Reasons Why I Hate GNU/Linux – Do You Hate (Love) Linux?

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I was recently being Interviewed by a company based in Mumbai (India). The person interviewing, asked me several questions and technologies, I have worked with. As per their requirements, I have worked with nearly half of the technologies they were looking for. A few of last conversation as mentioned below.

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10 things you need to know about Linux Mint 17

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Linux Mint 17 continues in a line of Linux desktop-focused releases, and in testing we found it’s become more mature than prior versions. There’s something here to please everyone. Civilians won’t hurt themselves deploying Cinnamon over Linux Mint 17. Developers will enjoy any of the versions, and the hard core will find lots to love with the LMDE versions.

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Compiler wars: LLVM and GCC compete on speed, security

Filed under
Development
GNU

LLVM has also recently inspired a project named Vellvm, where the design of the program and its output are both formally verified. The compiler's input and production can then be independently proven as consistent to defend against introduced bugs. The CompCert compiler already does this, but only for C; a formally verified version of LLVM could in theory do this for any language.

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FSF and Debian join forces to help free software users find the hardware they need

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

The Free Software Foundation (FSF) and the Debian project today
announced cooperation to expand and enhance h-node [1], a database to
help users learn and share information about computers that work with
free software operating systems.

1: http://h-node.org

While other databases list hardware that is technically compatible with
GNU/Linux, h-node lists hardware as compatible only if it does not
require any proprietary software or firmware. Information about hardware
that flunks this test is also included, so users know what to avoid. The
database lists individual components, like wifi and video cards, as well
as complete notebook systems.

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Linux workshop in Udupi

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The student chapter of Indian Society for Technical Education (ISTE) of SMV Institute of Technology and Management conducted a two-day workshop on Linux operating system for final year Electronics and Communications students at Bantakal in Udupi district on August 22 and 23.

Edwin, a former professor of Electronics Engineering at Spring Garden College, Philadelphia, U.S., was the resource person.

Prof. Edwin said that Linux, which was a free operating system and free from viruses, had been adapted by more computer hardware platforms than any other operating system.

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Qt and KDE: Qt Champions, Kdenlive, FreeBSD 12, Alejandro Montes Bascuñan and More

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Ubuntu: Nautilus 3.30 and Mir 1.1.0 Release

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SUSE: Aris Winardi, New User Interface for Open Build Service and More

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