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PINGUY OS 14.04 MINI AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Pinguy OS 14.04 Mini, an Ubuntu remaster that comes with a large number of tweaks by default, has been released today.

Pinguy OS Mini is a stripped down version of Pinguy OS which comes with all the tweaks and fixes available in the main Pinguy OS version, but without most of the applications installed in Pinguy OS. Like the main version, it uses GNOME Shell (3.10) as the default "shell".

The main (full) Pinguy OS version comes with multiple applications for some tasks, for instance there are multiple video players, audio players and web browsers, this allowing the users to try the apps for themselves and decide which is best for them. This is especially useful for users with slow Internet connections. In Pinguy OS Mini, there's only one web browser: Firefox, only one audio/video player: VLC and so on, so it can be used as a tweaked base on top of which you can add your favorite applications.

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Linux to the rescue! How Ubuntu can help a computer in distress

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GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

This may sound like sacrilege, but it's not: Ubuntu Linux can be useful even if you’re a hardcore Windows user.

That's because there’s no way to boot a full Windows system from a USB stick to troubleshoot your PC—well, not without an Enterprise version of Windows and Windows To Go—but anyone can make a free Ubuntu USB drive, CD, or DVD. A Ubuntu live drive can be used as a digital Swiss army knife to troubleshoot all sorts of problems with any PC, whether you need to recover files from a failing computer, diagnose hardware problems, perform a deep virus scan from outside Windows, or even reset a forgotten Windows password.

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Polishing the Rare Gem That Is Linux

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GNU
Linux

"My opinion is that Linux is ready, and has been ready for some time, for the average person's desktop computer," Stone explained. "The only thing that stands in the way is availability of some software and its image as a geek toy. If the software was there and it came installed like Windows currently does, Windows would be a thing of the past.

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Driving sustainable innovation in Governments with Open Source

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GNU
Linux
OSS

“Whether you’re aware of it or not, Linux is practically everywhere. It’s invisible, yet ubiquitous.”

And unlike today’s big software companies, no organisation can claim ownership of Linux because its development is mainly driven by a huge following of open and like-minded developer communities.

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Linux as a replacement for Windows

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

For those not in the know, let us first discuss what Linux is. It is not an application program; it is an operating system, in the same class as Windows or Apple’s Mac OS. An operating system is the piece of software that makes it possible to run any other application or user software on a computer. The operating system manages and provides the ability for programs to access the computer’s hardware, and it provides security mechanisms such as password-protected accounts that control user access. Operating systems have evolved into highly complex, multi-layered conglomerations that are essential to the operation of a computer.

Now then, your question essentially is whether Linux is a viable replacement for Windows. As usual, the answer is “that depends”. Specifically, it depends on what you want to do with the machine, and how much time you’re willing to put into learning about Linux. Where Windows is a vendor-built and supported operating system, Linux is open-source. That means the code base is public, and not supported by a company. Instead, it is supported by the community of users who contribute to its development. Since nobody “owns” Linux the way Microsoft owns Windows, it also means that multiple “flavors” of it exist – at least six or seven depending on how you count them.

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GEEK TO ME: Switching to Linux since Microsoft cuts XP support

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

There is no customer-service to call with such questions or when something goes wrong, but there is the Internet, and Linux support groups are very easy to find. A secondary advantage is that it runs in a far smaller footprint, and far more efficiently than Windows. That means that it can indeed breathe new life into that old system you were going to toss.

So what won’t Linux do? Well, it will not run Windows software, for one thing. Outlook, Office, Internet Explorer, certain games, etc. are all designed to run under Windows. The upside is that there are Linux-specific versions of just about any application software you need, so you’ll have ready access to a choice of web browsers, Office Automation Suites, photo editing utilities, or whatever you normally run under Windows — you just have to find them online, and then learn and get used to a new version.

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Swiss school invests open source savings in education

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GNU
Linux
OSS

The significant savings gained by using free and open source software in the school of the Swiss town of Villmergen are used to enhance the curriculum. Switching to free and open source has led to an increase in computers, motivating teachers to create their own courses. "Ubuntu Linux PCs are very easy to use and maintain, giving teachers more time to work with their students," says Martin Lang, the school's IT administrator.

The move to hassle-free software has created a virtuous circle, Lang says. Since most of the educational-applications created by the school are browser-based, teachers encourage students to bring their own computers. This again increases the number of PCs per classroom, making computer-aided teaching more attractive.

All teachers at the school can work with Ubuntu Linux, says Lang. "Changing their computer habits takes some effort, but they are motivated because of the increase in teaching possibilities."

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Enlightenment's Evas Adds OpenGL ETC2 Support

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GNU
Linux
Software

ETC2 is the lossy texture compression scheme developed by Ericsson that is royalty-free and is now mandated as part of the OpenGL ES 3.0 and OpenGL 4.3 specifications. For those unfamiliar with this alternative to S3TC, read ETC2 Texture Compression Looks Good For OpenGL.

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New course to cater to Linux newbies

Filed under
GNU
Linux

As the use of GNU/Linux grows and spreads, training has become more and more of a necessity if one wants to join the burgeoning ranks of administrators.

Given this, it is not surprising that the Linux Professional Institute has added a new course for the rank beginner, a course called Linux Essentials. The LPI already has courses for three levels of certification; the new course is aimed at the newcomer.

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Kubuntu 14.04 LTS review – is Linux ready for the desktop? Gadget Watch

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GNU
KDE
Linux
Reviews
Ubuntu

For years, proponents proclaimed the Linux operating system would someday be a viable competitor on desktop PCs to its rivals, Windows and Mac OSX.

When someone on an internet message board says they’re having trouble with a Mac or PC, someone will almost inevitably tell them to try Linux.

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More in Tux Machines

Critical Live Boot Bug Fixed and Ubuntu 18.04 is Finally Released

A critical bug in live boot session delayed Ubuntu 18.04 LTS release for several hours. The bug has been fixed and the ISO are available to download. Read more

Nintendo Switch hack + Dolphin Emulator could bring GameCube and Wii game support

This week security researchers released details about a vulnerability affecting NVIDIA Tegra X1 processors that makes it possible to bypass secure boot and run unverified code on some devices… including every Nintendo Switch game console that’s shipped to date. Among other things, this opens the door for running modified versions of Nintendo’s firmware, or alternate operating systems such as a GNU/Linux distribution. And if you can run Linux… you can also run Linux applications. Now it looks like one of those applications could be the Dolphin emulator, which lets you play Nintendo GameCube and Wii games on a computer or other supported devices. Read more

Openwashing Leftovers

Linux Foundation: New Members, Cloud Foundry, and Embedded Linux Conference + OpenIoT Summit

  • 41 Organizations Join The Linux Foundation to Support Open Source Communities With Infrastructure and Resources
    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, announced the addition of 28 Silver members and 13 Associate members. Linux Foundation members help support development of the shared technology resources, while accelerating their own innovation through open source leadership and participation. Linux Foundation member contributions help provide the infrastructure and resources that enable the world's largest open collaboration communities.
  • Cloud Foundry for Developers: Architecture
    Back in the olden days, provisioning and managing IT stacks was complex, time-consuming, and error-prone. Getting the resources to do your job could take weeks or months. Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) was the first major step in automating IT stacks, and introduced the self-service provisioning and configuration model. VMware and Amazon were among the largest early developers and service providers. Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) adds the layer to IaaS that provides application development and management. Cloud Foundry is for building Platform as a Service (PaaS) projects, which bundle servers, networks, storage, operating systems, middleware, databases, and development tools into scalable, centrally-managed hardware and software stacks. That is a lot of work to do manually, so it takes a lot of software to automate it.
  • Jonathan Corbet on Linux Kernel Contributions, Community, and Core Needs
    At the recent Embedded Linux Conference + OpenIoT Summit, I sat down with Jonathan Corbet, the founder and editor-in-chief of LWN to discuss a wide range of topics, including the annual Linux kernel report. The annual Linux Kernel Development Report, released by The Linux Foundation is the evolution of work Corbet and Greg Kroah-Hartman had been doing independently for years. The goal of the report is to document various facets of kernel development, such as who is doing the work, what is the pace of the work, and which companies are supporting the work.