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GNU

Six reasons why developers choose Ubuntu Desktop

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
Ubuntu

Used in more than 240 countries, by governments, enterprises, and consumers alike, Ubuntu Desktop is the number one Linux operating system (OS) in the world. Ubuntu Desktop is used by leading technology companies in no small part down to the popularity amongst software developers for which it is an attractive platform for a diverse range of applications including robotics, artificial intelligence, full stack web development and embedded devices.
But why is it so popular? This whitepaper examines six key reasons why the developer community turn to Ubuntu. From the rise of AI and machine learning to secure application packaging distribution through snaps, the use of Ubuntu by developers continues to increase.

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Also: Ubuntu available in new AWS Marketplace for Containers

47 GNU/Linux Distributions For Your Desktop, Old Computer, Hobbies Or Raspberry Pi

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The world of GNU/Linux distributions is a world full of open source and mostly free operating systems, all of them based on the same core. If you are thinking about giving some of them a chance, here are 47 GNU / Linux distributions series so you can find the one that best suits what you are looking for.

We will start with the best and simplest to start and take the first steps in GNU / Linux, and then we will continue with some a little more advanced. Once covered these two, we will talk about the best to take care of your privacy, cultivate your hobbies and even to get the most out of a Raspberry Pi. Let's focus on the desktop, so it will be the most popular operating system based on the Linux kernel: the Android.

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A New Raspberry Pi Board

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Raspberry Pi Trading, the company behind the revolutionary Raspberry Pi platform, has announced a new board – Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+ [1].

“You can now get the 1.4GHz clock speed, 5GHz wireless networking and improved thermals of Raspberry Pi 3B+ in a smaller form factor, and at the smaller price of $25. Meet the Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+,” said Eben Upton, the founder of the Raspberry Pi project.

The board is powered by Broadcom BCM2837B0, Cortex-A53 (ARMv8) 64-bit SoC @ 1.4GHz; comes with 512MB LPDDR2 SDRAM and 2.4GHz and 5GHz IEEE 802.11.b/g/n/ac wireless LAN and Bluetooth 4.2/BLE.

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GNU: New Article by Richard Stallman and New Software Releases

Filed under
GNU

One Linux Stack To Rule HPC And AI - The Next Platform

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

It is amazing how fast open source Linux displaced open systems Unix from the HPC datacenters of the world.

This change, which started in the early 2000s, was not just about having a fully open source operating system, which stands in stark contrast to the closed source Unix variants with a common set of APIs that met the SPEC 1170 common API set. While those common APIs made application portability easier across different Unixes, this capability was nowhere near as friction free as having a single operating system span multiple processor architectures and interconnects.

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Sacked NCC Group grad trainee emailed 300 coworkers about Kali Linux VM 'playing up'

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

An NCC Group graduate trainee who emailed 300 coworkers to ask for help with what she deemed to be "unusual" behaviour from her Kali Linux VM; contacted the firm’s incident response team to complain about a faulty laptop; and said the machine had been "deliberately sabotaged", has had her victimisation claim thrown out by an employment tribunal.

Nga Hoang, who joined NCC in June 2016 on its graduate trainee scheme, claimed to the London South Employment Tribunal that her litany of 13 protected disclosures and 17 "detriments", as defined in employment law (here and here), began just 10 days after she started working for the infosec consultancy.

The tribunal took place in Croydon, south London, from 25 to 29 June this year, and the outcome published this month.

Employment Judge Baron, sitting with two lay members, dismissed her entire case on 1 November (PDF), saying there was "no merit in any of the multiplicity of allegations" Hoang had made. She alleged her work laptop had been hacked from within the company network and that she was sacked for, among other things, revealing this to a laptop repair technician from Dell.

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10 Best Application Launchers for Linux Desktops

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The less often you use the computer mouse the more productive you become. This is the most important reason why I consciously work with keyboard shortcuts and it is undeniably a workflow improvement.

You will understand better when you launch apps with the convenience of app launchers via keyboard shortcuts and not browsing the app overview/menu.

We are interested in improving your workflow that is why we bring you the best application launchers for Linux Desktops.

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Compilers: Rust and GCC 7.4 RC1

Filed under
Development
GNU
  • RLSL Continues Maturing For Compiling Rust To SPIR-V For Use With Vulkan Drivers

    One of the most passionate topics by readers in the Phoronix Forums is the Rust programming language. For about one year now "RLSL" has been in the works as a Rust-based shading language that can compile into SPIR-V. While initially I held off on writing about it to see if it would be just another small toy project, RLSL has continued maturing and seeing new functionality added in.

  • GCC 7.4 Status Report (2018-11-22), GCC 7.4 RC1 scheduled for next week
  • GCC 7.4 Is Being Released Soon

    While GCC 9 is releasing in early 2019, for those still depending upon last year's GCC 7 compiler series, the GCC 7.4 point release will soon be out. 

    SUSE's Richard Biener is putting the finishing touches on GCC 7.4. He intends to issue the first release candidate towards the end of this week while the official GCC 7.4.0 compiler release shouldn't be long after that. The GCC 7 branch remains open for bug and documentation fixes.

Essential System Tools: Neofetch – System Information Tool written in Bash

Filed under
GNU
Software

This is the eleventh in our series of articles highlighting essential system tools. These are small, indispensable utilities, useful for system administrators as well as regular users of Linux based systems. The series examines both graphical and text based open source utilities. For this article, we’ll look at Neofetch. For details of all tools in this series, please check the table at the bottom of the article.

Neofetch is a command-line interface system information script written in bash 3.2+. The script displays information about your system next to an image, your operating system logo, or any ASCII/image file of your choice. It’s designed to capture information about your system and display it in an aesthetic and visually pleasing way.

The main purpose of Neofetch is to convey to others the operating system or Linux distribution running on a system, together with critical information such as its hardware specifications, desktop environment, theme, icons, and a lot more besides.

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I've got 99 problems but Linux ain't one

Filed under
GNU
Linux

As the global technology evangelist director of Red Hat’s portfolio product marketing group, I have a secondary focus on portfolio architectures. I research customer successes in solution implementation using our open source technologies, then produce generic higher-level architectural content so that others may benefit from these real-life experiences.

If that sounds kind of heavy, it all started innocently enough with my studies at Vrije University in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, where Andrew Tanenbaum was teaching networking and operating systems. Most people in our business know that Tanenbaum developed MINIX as a teaching tool, and he got into a bit of a flame war with Linus Torvalds when Linux first hit the scene.

While doing practical programming exercises for my operating systems course in 1998, I was not able to install MINIX at home, so that led me to install Linux on my laptop for the first time. I quickly understood that there were no problems I couldn’t troubleshoot; there were always logs to dig into and more information to discover. The code was available for exploration and fixes could be applied. I was hooked.

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Also: The GNU/Linux Desktop, Again

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat Openwashing Leadership, Promoting VirtIO-FS and Explaining HID

  • 5 things you won't learn from The Open Organization Leaders Manual
    Today the open organization community—a global group of writers, consultants, theorists, managers, and other organizational leaders dedicated to helping others understand how open principles can transform organizational culture and design—unveiled the second edition of The Open Organization Leaders Manual. Billed as "a handbook for building innovative and engaged teams," the book is available now as a Creative Commons-licensed eBook and a paperback.
  • Companies behind on digital transformation get ahead with open leaders
    One source of that disruption is digitization. Digitization is reshaping the way we lead, manage, and work. Even in the scope of the last decade, we've seen rapid adjustments to how we live, connect, and receive services. While we've been discussing ad nauseum how (or whether) we should be redefining organizational cultures and business models, the clock has been ticking, and the pace of digitization has not been slowing. In his book The Digital Matrix: New Rules for Business Transformation Through Technology, author Venkat Venkatraman argues that, by 2025, differences between digital and non-digital functions, processes, and business models will no longer exist.
  • VirtIO-FS: A Proposed Better Approach For Sharing Folders/Files With Guest VMs
    Red Hat developers have proposed a new VirtIO-FS component to provide better support for shared folders/files between the host and guest virtual machines.  VirtIO-FS was developed out of the need to share folders/files with guest VMs in a fast, consistent, and secure manner. They designed VirtIO-FS for Kata containers but coud be used with other VMs too. The closest existing project to fulfilling their needs was Virtio-9p, but there were performance issues and other factors leading them to designing this new solution.
  • Peter Hutterer: Understanding HID report descriptors
    This time we're digging into HID - Human Interface Devices and more specifically the protocol your mouse, touchpad, joystick, keyboard, etc. use to talk to your computer. Remember the good old days where you had to install a custom driver for every input device? Remember when PS/2 (the protocol) had to be extended to accommodate for mouse wheels, and then again for five button mice. And you had to select the right protocol to make it work. Yeah, me neither, I tend to suppress those memories because the world is awful enough as it is. As users we generally like devices to work out of the box. Hardware manufacturers generally like to add bits and bobs because otherwise who would buy that new device when last year's device looks identical. This difference in needs can only be solved by one superhero: Committee-man, with the superpower to survive endless meetings and get RFCs approved. Many many moons ago, when USB itself was in its infancy, Committee man and his sidekick Caffeine boy got the USB consortium agree on a standard for input devices that is so self-descriptive that operating systems (Win95!) can write one driver that can handle this year's device, and next year's, and so on. No need to install extra drivers, your device will just work out of the box. And so HID was born. This may only an approximate summary of history. Originally HID was designed to work over USB. But just like Shrek the technology world is obsessed with layers so these days HID works over different transport layers. HID over USB is what your mouse uses, HID over i2c may be what your touchpad uses. HID works over Bluetooth and it's celebrity-diet version BLE. Somewhere, someone out there is very slowly moving a mouse pointer by sending HID over carrier pigeons just to prove a point. Because there's always that one guy. HID is incredibly simple in that the static description of the device can just be bytes burnt into the ROM like the Australian sun into unprepared English backpackers. And the event frames are often an identical series of bytes where every bit is filled in by the firmware according to the axis/buttons/etc.

Today in Techrights

Android Leftovers

Canonical makes Kubernetes moves

When last I spoke to Mark Shuttleworth, Canonical's founder, in Berlin, he told me that -- when it comes to Kubernetes -- enterprise "Kubernetes runs on Ubuntu." Kubernetes, the most popular cloud container orchestration program, "makes life easier for people who want portability across public clouds. With multiple Kubernetes clusters you have one common way to run workloads on Linux over both private and public clouds." Read more