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GNU

Why TENS is the secure bootable Linux you need

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Before you get too excited, TENS isn't a pen-testing distro for admins to use to harden their network. TENS is a live desktop Linux distribution that gives the user a level of security they would not have with a standard desktop. That means it's great to use in places where network security is questionable, or when you need to submit sensitive data, and you don't trust a standard desktop operating system. In other words, anytime you need to use a network for the transmission of sensitive data, TENS Linux could easily be a top choice for users.

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New xfce4-settings release

Filed under
GNU
Linux

After quite a bit of development time I’m happy to announce the next development point release of xfce4-settings in the 4.13 series.

There are many fixes in this release – most visibly also UI improvements. This includes consistent padding/margin etc across all dialogs as well as a restored hover-effect in the Settings Manager. Finally both the advanced (fake panel as indicator for primary displays, re-arranged settings and distinct advanced tab) and the minimal display dialog (new icons, improved strings) received a facelift.

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Also: Xfce Picks Up Support For Monitor Profiles

Manjaro 18 Nearly Here as Lots of Testing Updates Pushed This Week

Filed under
GNU
Linux

It will also feature a 13.3” FHD IPS display at 1920 x 1080 resolution, 6GB of DDR3L RAM, and an 8000mAh battery with up to 8 hours of battery life.

Manjaro is definitely not the first Linux distribution to also get into the hardware scene, but given Manjaro’s surge of popularity this year, they could do quite nicely with the Bladebook, which is purported to be part of a series – so assuming the Bladebook does well, it won’t be the last hardware we’ll see from Manjaro. That’s a big “if” statement, however.

If you’re interested in trying the latest Manjaro-Xfce beta builds to see what all the hype is about, you can grab it here – alternatively, you can try the Manjaro KDE beta (running KDE v5.13), or the Manjaro GNOME BETA (GNOME v3.30). Finally, you can just download the latest stable version (Manjaro 17.1.12 in XFCE, KDE, GNOME, or the customizable Architect installer).

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Dragora 3.0 Alpha 2 Released As One Of The Libre GNU/Linux Platforms

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OS
GNU

Dragora is one of the lesser known Linux distributions that is focused on shipping "entirely free software" to the standards of the FSF/GNU.

Dragora is focused on simplicity and elegance while being a "quality GNU/Linux distribution." With the Dragora 3.0 Alpha 2 release they continue working on transitioning to the Musl C library, restructuring of the file-system directories, transitioning over to the SysVinit init system, enhancements to the boot script, improving the initial LiveCD experience, upgrading to the GCC 8 compiler stack, adding Meson+Ninja support, improving the security, making use of LibreSSL 2.8, and a variety of other alterations.

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GNU Releases

Filed under
GNU
  • GNU dico Version 2.7

    Important changes in this version:

    1. Support for virtual databases
    2. The dictorg module improved
    3. Support for building with WordNet on Debian-based systems
    4. Default m4 quoting characters changed to [ ]
    5. Dicoweb: graceful handling of unsupported content types.

  • first release of StepSync!

    StepSync allows synchronization of folders, optionally recursively descending in sub-folders. It allows thus various options of performing backups: pure insertion, updates and including full synchronization by importing changes from target to source.

  • GNU Spotlight with Mike Gerwitz: 15 new GNU releases!

    autogen-5.18.16
    bison-3.1
    dico-2.7
    gdb-8.2
    gnupg-2.2.10
    gnu-pw-mgr-2.4.2
    gnutls-3.6.4
    guile-cv-0.2.0
    help2man-1.47.7
    indent-2.2.12
    librejs-7.17.0
    mes-0.17.1
    nano-3.1
    parallel-20180922
    xorriso-1.5.0

5 cool tiling window managers

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The Linux desktop ecosystem offers multiple window managers (WMs). Some are developed as part of a desktop environment. Others are meant to be used as standalone application. This is the case of tiling WMs, which offer a more lightweight, customized environment. This article presents five such tiling WMs for you to try out.

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Vember Audio’s Surge Plug-in Liberated Under GNU GPLv3

Filed under
GNU
OSS
Legal
  • Surge Synth Set Free

    Vember Audio tells us that, as of 21th September 2018, Surge stopped being a commerical product and became an open-source project released under the GNU GPL v3 license. They say that, for the existing users, this will allow the community to make sure that it remains compatible as plug-in standards and Operating Systems evolve and, for everyone else, it is an exiting new free synth to use, hack, port, improve or do whatever you want with.

  • Vember Audio’s Surge synth plugin is now free and open-source

    Reviewing Vember Audio’s Surge synth over a decade ago, we said: “This is a big, beautiful-sounding instrument. It's not cheap, but few plugins of this quality are.” Well, the sound hasn’t changed, but the price has; in fact, Surge has just been made free and open-source.

    Thanks to its wavetable oscillators and FM-style algorithms, Surge is capable of creating some pretty sparkling sounds, but it also has analogue-style functions that make it suitable for producing vintage keyboard tones.

    Vember Audio says that it’s been set free so that it can continue to be developed by the community and remain compatible with current standards and operating systems.

System76 To Release A "New Open-Source Computer"

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Longtime Linux PC vendor System76 has begun teasing a "new open-source computer" they will release in the coming weeks.

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Happy Birthday, GNU: Why I still love GNU 35 years later

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GNU

GNU was publicly announced on September 27, 1983, and today has a strong following.

GNU is...

an operating system
an extensive collection of computer software
free software
licensed under the GNU Project's own General Public License (GPL)

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Why Nerds Use Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

1) A good reason to use Linux is to have the pleasure of saying you do not use Windows when someone asks you to go to your home to fix your computer and you do not know the reason for the problem. You can say that you do not know Windows and can not fix it.

​Not infrequently we find an unrecoverable pirated Windows full of malware and everything else, with important data that the user does not want to lose, but of course, did not make a simple backup. After this grim picture, we can only say: "Sorry, my friend, I do not know Windows, I only use Linux."

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More in Tux Machines

BSD: FreeBSD 12.0 Beta and Upgrading OpenBSD with Ansible

Graphics: XRGEARS and Arcan's Latest

  • XRGEARS: Infamous "Gears" Now On VR Headsets With OpenHMD, Vulkan
    Well, the virtual reality (VR) demo scene is now complete with having glxgears-inspired gears and Utah teapot rendering on VR head mounted displays with the new XRGEARS. Kidding aside about the gears and teapot, XRGEARS is a nifty new open-source project with real value by Collabora developer Lubosz Sarnecki. XRGEARS is a standalone VR demo application built using the OpenHMD initiative for tracking and Vulkan for rendering. XRGEARS supports both Wayland and X11 environments or even running off KMS itself. This code also makes use of VK_EXT_direct_mode_display with DRM leasing.
  • Arcan versus Xorg – Approaching Feature Parity
    This is the first article out of three in a series where I will go through what I consider to be the relevant Xorg feature set, and compare it, point by point, to how the corresponding solution or category works in Arcan. This article will solely focus on the Display Server set of features and how they relate to Xorg features, The second article will cover the features that are currently missing (e.g. network transparency) when they have been accounted for. The third article will cover the features that are already present in Arcan (and there are quite a few of those) but does not exist in Xorg.
  • Arcan Display Server Is Nearing Feature Parity With The X.Org Server
    The Arcan display server, which started off years ago sounding like a novelty with being a display server built off a game engine in part and other interesting features, is nearing feature parity with the X.Org Server. While most hobbyist display server projects have failed, Arcan has continued advancing and with an interesting feature set. Recently they have even been working on a virtual reality desktop and an interesting desktop in general. Arcan is getting close to being able to offering the same functionality as a traditional X.Org Server. If you are interested in a lengthy technical read about the differences between Arcan and X.Org, the Arcan developers themselves did some comparing and contrasting when it comes to the display support, windowing, input, font management, synchronization, and other areas.

CoC/Systemd Supremacy Over Linux Kernel

  • New Linux Code of Conduct Revisions: CoC Committee Added Plus Interpretation & Mediator
    The Linux Code of Conduct introduced last month that ended up being quite contentious will see some revisions just ahead of the Linux 4.19 stable kernel release. Greg Kroah-Hartman has outlined the planned changes as well as a new Code of Conduct Interpretation document. In the weeks since the Linux kernel CoC was merged, various patches were proposed but none merged yet. It turns out Greg KH was working in private with various kernel maintainers/developers on addressing their feedback and trying to come up with solutions to the contentious issues in private.
  • Some kernel code-of-conduct refinements
    Greg Kroah-Hartman has posted a series of patches making some changes around the newly adopted code of conduct. In particular, it adds a new document describing how the code is to be interpreted in the kernel community.
  • Systemd Adds Feature To Fallback Automatically To Older Kernels On Failure
    Systemd's latest feature is the concept of "boot counting" that will track kernel boot attempts and failures as part of an automatic boot assessment. Ultimately this is to provide automatic fallback to older kernels should a newer kernel be consistently failing. The feature was crafted over the past few months by Lennart Poettering himself to provide a way when making use of systemd-boot on UEFI systems it can automatically fallback to an older kernel if a newer kernel is consistently causing problems. This is treated as an add-on to the Boot Loader Specification. The systemd boot assessment is designed that it could also be used by non-UEFI systems and other boot platforms.

ODROID 'Hacker Board'

  • ODROID Rolling Out New Intel-Powered Single Board Computer After Trying With Ryzen
    While ODROID is most known for their various ARM single board computers (SBCs), some of which offer impressive specs, they have dabbled in x86 SBCs and on Friday announced the Intel-powered ODROID-H2. In the announcement they mentioned as well they were exploring an AMD Ryzen 5 2500U powered SBC computer, which offered fast performance but the price ended up being prohibitive. After the falling out with Ryzen over those cost concerns, they decided to go ahead with an Intel Geminilake SoC. Geminilake is slower than their proposed Ryzen board, but the price was reasonable and it ends up still being much faster than ODROID's earlier Apollolake SBC.
  • Odroid-H2 is world’s first Gemini Lake hacker board
    Hardkernel unveiled the Odroid-H2, the first hacker board with an Intel Gemini Lake SoC. The Ubuntu 18.10 driven SBC ships with 2x SATA 3.0, 2x GbE, HDMI and DP, 4x USB, and an M.2 slot for NVMe. When the Odroid-H2 goes on sale in November at a price that will be “higher than $100,” Hardkernel will join a small group of vendors that have launched a community backed x86-based SBC. This first open spec hacker board built around Intel’s new Gemini Lake SoC — and one of the first Gemini Lake SBCs of any kind — follows earlier Arm-based Odroid winners such as the Odroid-C2 Raspberry Pi pseudo clone and the octa-core Odroid-XU4.