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GNU

Fedora-Based Desktops

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Red Hat
  • A Fedora 28 Remix for Tegra using i3

    This is dedicated to older Tegra such as Tegra20, Tegra30 and Tegra114. It can work on Tegra K1, but at this time, using Fedora 29 is a better choice. Specially as Fedora 29 on Tegra K1 have support for GPU acceleration with nouveau.

    The image integrates the grate-driver that provides a reverse-engineer mesa driver (FLOSS, but not yet upstream). This only advertises OpenGL 1.4 yet, but it can at least run glxgears fine. This is not the case with the softpipe driver on Tegra20.

    [...]

    Interested in having an official i3 spin in Fedora? For Tegra, it will depends on the upstreaming of the grate-driver, but I've submitted a PR to have an i3 spin. As some arm or aarch64 based devices that can output display, but may not be able to have enough accelerated desktop capabilities (Unless using a proprietary or downstream driver that won't be in Fedora).

  • NeuroFedora: towards a ready to use Free/Open source environment for neuroscientists

    I've recently resurrected the NeuroFedora SIG. Many thanks to Igor and the others who had worked on it in the past and have given us a firm base to build on.

New Chromium change makes it easier to uninstall Chrome OS Linux apps

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

The most recent release of Chrome OS added Linux app support, but it’s clear the feature has a long way to go before leaving beta. A new Chromium code change has been discovered that will bring some simplicity and consistency when you want to uninstall Chrome OS Linux apps.

Because of the inclusion of innovative Linux app support in Chrome OS 69, more users have been getting exposed to the wide world of Linux apps, some for the first time. These first time users may not necessarily have a great experience, as Linux can sometimes be a little rough around the edges.

The best example of this is in app installation and removal. Currently, to uninstall Chrome OS Linux apps, you need to use the command line or a separately installed package manager application. Chrome OS’s Linux app support does not come with an instruction manual, and this procedure is not necessarily intuitive.

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Open Source Logging Tools for Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

If you’re a Linux systems administrator, one of the first tools you will turn to for troubleshooting are log files. These files hold crucial information that can go a long way to help you solve problems affecting your desktops and servers. For many sysadmins (especially those of an old-school sort), nothing beats the command line for checking log files. But for those who’d rather have a more efficient (and possibly modern) approach to troubleshooting, there are plenty of options.

In this article, I’ll highlight a few such tools available for the Linux platform. I won’t be getting into logging tools that might be specific to a certain service (such as Kubernetes or Apache), and instead will focus on tools that work to mine the depths of all that magical information written into /var/log.

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Also: Terminalizer – A Tool To Record Your Terminal And Generate Animated Gif Images

Steam GNU/Linux Usage Doubles This Year, Google Still Snubs Linux Drivers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
Gaming
  • Steam Linux Usage For September Revised Slightly Higher

    The initial Steam Linux market-share figures for September showed a rise in Linux gamers which isn't too surprising given the recent roll-out of Steam Play / Proton. It turns out those figures are even higher than originally reported.

    The original Steam survey figures for September 2019 put the Linux gaming market-share at 0.71%, or a 0.12% increase compared to the month prior. That has now been revised to 0.78%.

  • Google Has ‘No Plans’ to Enable Chrome Hardware Acceleration on Linux

    Google says it has no plans to enable Chrome hardware acceleration on Linux — not even as an experimental option.

    The news is certain to be greeted with groans by those who struggle to stream HD YouTube videos and other rich media content smoothly in Chrome on Linux.

Why TENS is the secure bootable Linux you need

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Before you get too excited, TENS isn't a pen-testing distro for admins to use to harden their network. TENS is a live desktop Linux distribution that gives the user a level of security they would not have with a standard desktop. That means it's great to use in places where network security is questionable, or when you need to submit sensitive data, and you don't trust a standard desktop operating system. In other words, anytime you need to use a network for the transmission of sensitive data, TENS Linux could easily be a top choice for users.

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New xfce4-settings release

Filed under
GNU
Linux

After quite a bit of development time I’m happy to announce the next development point release of xfce4-settings in the 4.13 series.

There are many fixes in this release – most visibly also UI improvements. This includes consistent padding/margin etc across all dialogs as well as a restored hover-effect in the Settings Manager. Finally both the advanced (fake panel as indicator for primary displays, re-arranged settings and distinct advanced tab) and the minimal display dialog (new icons, improved strings) received a facelift.

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Also: Xfce Picks Up Support For Monitor Profiles

Manjaro 18 Nearly Here as Lots of Testing Updates Pushed This Week

Filed under
GNU
Linux

It will also feature a 13.3” FHD IPS display at 1920 x 1080 resolution, 6GB of DDR3L RAM, and an 8000mAh battery with up to 8 hours of battery life.

Manjaro is definitely not the first Linux distribution to also get into the hardware scene, but given Manjaro’s surge of popularity this year, they could do quite nicely with the Bladebook, which is purported to be part of a series – so assuming the Bladebook does well, it won’t be the last hardware we’ll see from Manjaro. That’s a big “if” statement, however.

If you’re interested in trying the latest Manjaro-Xfce beta builds to see what all the hype is about, you can grab it here – alternatively, you can try the Manjaro KDE beta (running KDE v5.13), or the Manjaro GNOME BETA (GNOME v3.30). Finally, you can just download the latest stable version (Manjaro 17.1.12 in XFCE, KDE, GNOME, or the customizable Architect installer).

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Dragora 3.0 Alpha 2 Released As One Of The Libre GNU/Linux Platforms

Filed under
OS
GNU

Dragora is one of the lesser known Linux distributions that is focused on shipping "entirely free software" to the standards of the FSF/GNU.

Dragora is focused on simplicity and elegance while being a "quality GNU/Linux distribution." With the Dragora 3.0 Alpha 2 release they continue working on transitioning to the Musl C library, restructuring of the file-system directories, transitioning over to the SysVinit init system, enhancements to the boot script, improving the initial LiveCD experience, upgrading to the GCC 8 compiler stack, adding Meson+Ninja support, improving the security, making use of LibreSSL 2.8, and a variety of other alterations.

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GNU Releases

Filed under
GNU
  • GNU dico Version 2.7

    Important changes in this version:

    1. Support for virtual databases
    2. The dictorg module improved
    3. Support for building with WordNet on Debian-based systems
    4. Default m4 quoting characters changed to [ ]
    5. Dicoweb: graceful handling of unsupported content types.

  • first release of StepSync!

    StepSync allows synchronization of folders, optionally recursively descending in sub-folders. It allows thus various options of performing backups: pure insertion, updates and including full synchronization by importing changes from target to source.

  • GNU Spotlight with Mike Gerwitz: 15 new GNU releases!

    autogen-5.18.16
    bison-3.1
    dico-2.7
    gdb-8.2
    gnupg-2.2.10
    gnu-pw-mgr-2.4.2
    gnutls-3.6.4
    guile-cv-0.2.0
    help2man-1.47.7
    indent-2.2.12
    librejs-7.17.0
    mes-0.17.1
    nano-3.1
    parallel-20180922
    xorriso-1.5.0

5 cool tiling window managers

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The Linux desktop ecosystem offers multiple window managers (WMs). Some are developed as part of a desktop environment. Others are meant to be used as standalone application. This is the case of tiling WMs, which offer a more lightweight, customized environment. This article presents five such tiling WMs for you to try out.

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Games: Hand of Fate 2, Rocket League, Reigns: Game of Thrones

today's leftovers

OSS Leftover

  • How an affordable open source eye tracker is helping thousands communicate
    In 2015, while sat in a meeting at his full-time job, Julius Sweetland posted to Reddit about a project he had quietly been working on for years, that would help people with motor neurone disease communicate using just their eyes and an application. He forgot about the post for a couple of hours before friends messaged him to say he'd made the front page. Now three years on Optikey, the open source eye-tracking communication tool, is being used by thousands of people, largely through word of mouth recommendations. Sweetland was speaking at GitHub Universe at the Palace of Fine Art in San Francisco, and he took some time to speak with Techworld about the project. [...] Originally, Sweetland's exposure to open source had largely been through the consumption of tools such as the GIMP. "I knew of the concept, I didn't really know how the nuts and bolts worked, I was always a little blase about how do you make money from something like that... but flipping it around again I'm still coming from the point of view that there's no money in my product, so I still don't understand how people make money in open source...
  • Fission open source serverless framework gets updated
    Platform9 just released updates to Fission.io - the open source, Kubernetes-native Serverless framework, with new features enabling developers and IT Operations to improve the quality and reliability of serverless applications. Other new features include Automated Canary Deployments to reduce the risk of failed releases, Prometheus integration for automated monitoring and alerts, and fine-grained cost and performance optimization capabilities. With this latest release, Fission offers the most complete set of features to allow Dev and Ops teams to safely adopt Serverless and benefit from the speed, cost savings and scalability of this cloud native development pattern on any environment - either in the public cloud or on-premises.
  • Alphabet’s DeepMind open-sources key building blocks from its AI projects
  • United States: It's Ten O'Clock: Do You Know Where Your Software Developers Are? [Ed: Smith Gambrell & Russell LLP are liars. Dana Hustins says FSF "purport to convert others' proprietary software into open source software" in there. They paint GPL as a conspiracy of some kind to entrap proprietary s/w developers.]
  • Transatomic Power To Open Source IP Regarding Advanced Molten Salt Reactors [Ed: There's no such thing as "IP", Duane Morris LLP. There are copyrights, trademarks, patents etc. and Transatomic basically made code free.]
  • Code Review--an Excerpt from VM Brasseur's New Book Forge Your Future with Open Source
    Even new programmers can provide a lot of value with their code reviews. You don't have to be a Rockstar Ninja 10x Unicorn Diva programmer with years and years of experience to have valuable insights. In fact, you don't even have to be a programmer at all. You just have to be knowledgable enough to spot patterns. While you won't be able to do a complete review without programming knowledge, you may still spot things that could use some work or clarification. If you're not a Rockstar Ninja 10x Unicorn Diva programmer, not only is your code review feedback still valuable, but you can also learn a great deal in the process: Code layout, programming style, domain knowledge, best practices, neat little programming tricks you'd not have seen otherwise, and sometimes antipatterns (or "how not to do things"). So don't let the fact that you're unfamiliar with the code, the project, or the language hold you back from reviewing code contributions. Give it a go and see what there is to learn and discover.

Security Leftovers