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GNU

Software: GDB 8.3, Unifont 12.1.01, Pomotroid, and tiny-curl

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GNU
Software
  • GDB 8.3 released!

    Release 8.3 of GDB, the GNU Debugger, is now available. GDB is a source-level debugger for Ada, C, C++, Go, Rust, and many other languages. GDB can target (i.e., debug programs running on) more than a dozen different processor architectures, and GDB itself can run on most popular GNU/Linux, Unix and Microsoft Windows variants. GDB is free (libre) software.

  • GDB 8.3 Debugger Brings RISC-V, Terminal Styling, C++ Injection, IPv6 Connections

    The big GDB 8.3 feature release was just announced by Joel Brobecker. This update to the GNU Debugger comes with many improvements and new features for assisting developers.

    The GNU Debugger 8.3 release brings native configurations for RISC-V GNU/Linux and RISC-V FreeBSD, support for the C-SKY CPU architecture, OpenRISC GNU/Linux support, support for terminal styling on the CLI and TUI, experimental support for compilation/injection of C++ source code into the inferior, GDB/GDBserver finally support IPv6 connections, and a variety of other improvements.

  • Unifont 12.1.01 Released

    11 May 2019 Unifont 12.1.01 is now available. Significant changes in this version include the Reiwa Japanese era glyph (U+32FF), which was the only addition made in the Unicode 12.1.0 release of 7 May 2019; Rebecca Bettencourt has contributed many Under ConScript Uniocde Registry (UCSUR) scripts; and David Corbett and Johnnie Weaver modified glyphs in two Plane 1 scripts. Full details are in the ChangeLog file.

  • Pomotroid is the Best Open Source Pomodoro Technique App Yet

    We have reviewed the Pomotroid app and how it works so far. Whether it fits to your needs or you prefer another app is up to you, but it can be fair to say that the app does its job very well. Very few other open source options do exist.

    Do you use the Pomodoro technique? What software do you use to help manage your time with it? We would love to hear about your opinions in the comments below.

  • Daniel Stenberg: tiny-curl

    curl, or libcurl specifically, is probably the world’s most popular and widely used HTTP client side library counting more than six billion installs.

    curl is a rock solid and feature-packed library that supports a huge amount of protocols and capabilities that surpass most competitors. But this comes at a cost: it is not the smallest library you can find.

    Within a 100K

    Instead of being happy with getting told that curl is “too big” for certain use cases, I set a goal for myself: make it possible to build a version of curl that can do HTTPS and fit in 100K (including the wolfSSL TLS library) on a typical 32 bit architecture.

    As a comparison, the tiny-curl shared library when built on an x86-64 Linux, is smaller than 25% of the size as the default Debian shipped library is.

NixOS Takes Action After 1.2GB/s ZFS Encryption Speed Drops To 200MB/s With Linux 5.0+

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GNU
Linux

The change in Linux 5.0 that initially broke ZFS On Linux compatibility ends up being pretty nasty for the ZFS encryption performance... A NixOS developer reports that the functions no longer exported by Linux 5.0+ and previously used by ZoL for AVX/AES-NI support end up dropping the ZFS data-set encryption performance to 200MB/s where as pre-5.0 kernels ran around 1.2GB/s.

This was the problem early on during the Linux 5.0 kernel cycle with the __kernel_fpu_ begin/restore functions no longer being exported. Even with the Linux 5.2 kernel merge window going on right now, a solution to satisfy the ZFS On Linux usage hasn't been achieved. Their used workaround by ZFS On Linux disables the vector-based (SSE/AVX) algorithms when building against Linux 5.0+. That in turn is what causes the big performance drop when running on the recent kernels.

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LibreELEC (Leia) 9.0.2 MR

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GNU
Linux

LibreELEC 9.0.2 (Leia) has arrived based upon Kodi v18.2, the 9.0.2 release contains many changes and refinements to user experience and a complete overhaul of the underlying OS core to improve stability and extend hardware support. Kodi v18 also brings new features like Kodi Retroplayer and DRM support that (equipped with an appropriate add-on) allows Kodi to unofficially stream content from services like Netflix and Amazon. Changes since LibreELEC 9.0.1: updated Kodi to 18.2 updated Kernel to 4.19.36 fixed TBS 5520SE tuning fixed Zotac remotes fixed pvr.hts (Tvheadend) timeshift (partly) Settings Add-on: Changeable SSH passwords! Default firewall (iptables) with simple...

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Best Linux distros for small businesses in 2019

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GNU
Linux

Running a small business is no easy task. The last thing you need is extra complexity in your IT infrastructure – so why turn to Linux?

Well, it could (if you're lucky) actually turn out to be a less complex choice for many tasks, depending on the distribution you select. And, critically, Linux is free; at least if you don't figure in support costs. That's an overhead ticked off the list.

So what's the best choice for your small business? We've approached this selection with a few criteria in mind. Stability must come first: if you're putting a distro to work, uptime is critical. Solid support provision comes a close second.

We've also considered practical capabilities, which is why you'll find a couple of non-desktop distributions on our list.

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Also:

BattlEye now say they're working with Valve to support Steam Play

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GNU
Linux
Gaming

Here's a bit of interesting news to end the week with, BattlEye have said they are working with Valve to get their anti-cheat working with Steam Play/Proton.

The curious thing here, is that I did speak to BattlEye back in March where they told me they would only be able to support native Linux games. In my email to BattlEye I did mention our previous chat, but it seems the below quote is the standard line they're giving out on this.

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11 Best Free Linux e-Learning Tools

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GNU
Linux
Software

E-Learning consists of all types of electronically supported teaching and learning. It represents the computer and network-enabled transfer of knowledge, behaviors, and skills. E-learning includes Web-based learning, virtual classrooms, digital collaboration, and computer-based applications. The learning activity is often delivered over the internet and intranet/extranet, although optical media, and satellite TV are also alternatives.

E-Learning has many benefits over traditional methods of learning. It enables individuals to study when it would otherwise not be practical. For example, a student may live in a remote location and be unable to relocate e.g. because of family commitments. It also allows the tuition to be self-paced or instructor-led, and is often more economical than traditional methods.

Linux has a wide range of e-Learning software available. The purpose of this article is to focus on open source software which is both user friendly for students and instructors.

To provide an insight into the software that is available, we have compiled a list of 11 of our favorite e-Learning tools. Hopefully, there will be something of interest here for anyone who wants to embrace electronically supported learning and teaching. We give our strongest recommendation to Moodle, Rogo, and ATutor.

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Endless Launches Linux Games For Kids To Teach Them Coding

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GNU
Linux
Gaming

Endless, the maker of Endless OS, has launched Endless Studios. Matt Dalio, founder of Endless, along with the Endless Studios team have created a series of games based on Linux, Endless OS, and Hack that teach kids to code in a fun way.

The company aims to help kids as young as eight years old get acquainted with programming. The games have been made in a way that would encourage them to code through hacking.

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Raspberry Pi-Sized DIY Retro Gaming Console Lets You Relive Childhood

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

Roshambo Pro has released a retro DIY gaming console which is sure to please the inner child in you. The kit includes a retro gaming console shell, heat sink, controllers and much more. The best part is that the retro console shell, which resembles SNES Europe or Super Famicom, can use a number of tiny SOCs.

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Linux Devices: Building a Raspberry Pi Rover and Linaro Turns 9

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GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Building a Raspberry Pi Rover: My Big Fat Linux Weekend

    Linux! Such a wonderful, rich, capable operating system has blessed us, and all for the low, low cost of absolutely free.

  • Nine years of Linaro

    Nine years ago at 11:00 a group of developers gathered in a small room. I was one of them and did not knew anyone from a group before entering the room.

    The meeting took place in Dolce La Hulpe Hotel and Resort in a village close to Brussels, Belgium. It was on first day of UDS-M.

    This was the first meeting of NewCo developers. The organization now known as Linaro.

Alpine 3.9.4 released

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GNU
Linux

The Alpine Linux project is pleased to announce the immediate availability of version 3.9.4 of its Alpine Linux operating system.

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Also: Docker Image Vulnerability - CVE-2019-5021

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More in Tux Machines

Graphics: Red Hat's Wayland Agenda and AMD Begins Queueing Graphics Driver Changes For The Linux 5.3 Kernel

  • Hans de Goede: Wayland itches summary
    1. Middle click on title / header bar to lower the Window does not work for native apps. Multiple people have reported this issue to me. A similar issue was fixed for not being able to raise Windows. It should be easy to apply a similar fix for the lowering problem. There are bugs open for this here, here and here. 2. Running graphical apps via sudo or pxexec does not work. There are numerous examples of apps breaking because of this, such as lshw-gui and usbivew. At least for X11 apps this is not that hard to fix. But sofar this has deliberately not been fixed. The reasoning behind this is described in this bug. I agree with the reasoning behind this, but I think it is not pragmatic to immediately disallow all GUI apps to connect when run as root starting today.
  • Hans de Goede: Better support for running games under Wayland (with GNOME3/mutter as compositor)
    First of all I do not want people to get their hopes up about $subject of this blogpost. Improving gaming support is a subjects which holds my personal interest and it is an issue I plan to spend time on trying to improve. But this will take a lot of time (think months for simple things, years for more complex things).
  • AMD Begins Queueing Graphics Driver Changes For The Linux 5.3 Kernel
    Being past the Linux 5.2 kernel merge window, AMD's open-source Linux graphics driver developers have already begun queuing changes anticipated for Linux 5.3 via a work-in-progress tree. Given the short time that this 5.3 WIP tree has been around, there isn't too much exciting about the changes -- yet. But surely over the weeks ahead it will get interesting. Making things particularly interesting is that we are expecting initial Navi support to make it for Linux 5.3... In recent weeks AMD began pushing AMDGPU LLVM compiler back-end changes for GFX10/Navi and we expect the AMDGPU DRM kernel driver enablement to come for Linux 5.3. Linux 5.3 will already be arriving after the rumored release of the first Navi graphics cards so having to wait past 5.3 for mainline support would already be tragic. But given the recent LLVM activity, we expect AMD to push out the Navi kernel driver changes soon. For that likely massive patch-set to be reviewed in time, the Navi patches would need to make their debut within the next few weeks.

today's howtos and programming

Fedora 30 Workstation review - Smarter, faster and buggier

Fedora 30 is definitely one of the more interesting releases of this family in a long-time. It brings significant changes, including solid improvements in the desktop performance and responsiveness. Over the years, Fedora went from no proprietary stuff whatsoever to slowly acknowledging the modern needs of computing, so now it gives you MP3 codecs and you can install graphics drivers and such. Reasonable looks, plus good functionality across the board. However, there were tons of issues, too. Printing to Samba, video screenshot bug, installer cropped-image slides, package management complications, mouse cursor lag, oopses, average battery life, and inadequate usability out of the box. You need to change the defaults to have a desktop that can be used in a quick, efficient way without remembering a dozen nerdy keyboard shortcuts. All in all, I like the freshness. In general, it would seem the Linux desktop is seeing a cautious revival, and Fedora's definitely a happy player. But there are too many rough edges. Well, we got performance tweaks after so many years, and codecs, we might get window buttons and desktop icons one day back, too. Something like 6/10, and definitely worth exploring. I am happy enough to do two more tests. I will run an in-vivo upgrade on the F29 instance on this same box, and then also test the distro on an old Nvidia-powered laptop, which will showcase both the support for proprietary graphics (didn't work the last time) and performance improvements, if they scale for old hardware, too. That's all for now. Read more

Events: Automotive at LF, Linux Clusters Institute, Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC)

  • Automotive Linux Summit and Open Source Summit Japan Keynote Speakers and Schedule Announced
    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source has announced the speaker line up for Open Source Summit Japan and Automotive Linux Summit. One registration provides access to all content at both events, which will be held July 17-19 at the Toranomon Hills Forum in Tokyo. Open Source Summit Japan (OSSJ) and Automotive Linux Summit (ALS) will bring together top talent from companies on the leading edge of innovation including Toyota Motor Corporation, Uber, Intel, Sony, Google, Microsoft and more. Talks will cover a range of topics, with ALS talks on everything from infrastructure and hardware to compliance and security; and OSSJ sessions on AI, Linux systems, cloud infrastructure, cloud native applications, open networking, edge computing, safety and security and open source best practices.
  • Register Now for the 2019 Introductory Linux Clusters Institute Workshop
    Registration is now open for the 2019 Linux Clusters Institute (LCI) Introductory Workshop,which will be held August 19-23, 2019 at the Rutgers University Inn & Conference Center in New Brunswick, NJ. This workshop will cover the fundamentals of setting up and administering a high-performance computing (HPC) cluster and will be led by leading HPC experts.
  • Additional early bird slots available for LPC 2019
    The Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC) registration web site has been showing “sold out” recently because the cap on early bird registrations was reached. We are happy to report that we have reviewed the registration numbers for this year’s conference and were able to open more early bird registration slots. Beyond that, regular registration will open July 1st. Please note that speakers and microconference runners get free passes to LPC, as do some microconference presenters, so that may be another way to attend the conference. Time is running out for new refereed-track and microconference proposals, so visit the CFP page soon. Topics for accepted microconferences are welcome as well.