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5 Linux Apps I’m Excited About

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GNU
Linux

5 Linux Apps I’m Excited About. It’s difficult to keep track of the various apps (applications/software) out there for Linux since there are more choices available than what we see in our distro’s repositories. That said, there are some apps that have me more excited about using Linux than ever before. Here’s my top 5 Linux apps I’m excited about.

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Parrot Security OS: Product Review

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GNU
Linux
Reviews
Security

Generally, Parrot OS is pretty great user friendly and lightweight distro. While using it, you’ll find it nearly equal to Kali Linux except for some minor differences. It may not offer a lot of tools that are present in Kali Linux but overall collection of tools is amazing. It also offers some tools that are not present in Kali and other similar distros. Parrot Security OS isn’t just for Ethical Hacking and Pentesting, it is also for development, anonymity and privacy

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16 Best Linux IRC Clients (Updated 2019)

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GNU
Linux
Software
Web

Internet Relay Chat (IRC) is a form of real-time Internet text messaging (chat) or synchronous conferencing. IRC was born during summer 1988 when Jarkko Oikarinen wrote the first IRC client and server when he was working in the Department of Information Processing Science at the University of Oulu, Finland. This system enables millions of people around the world to communicate in real time. While IRC has lost some popularity, IRCv3 looks interesting with some advanced client features such as instant notifications, improved security and more.

IRC is mainly designed for group communication in discussion forums, called channels, but it also allows one-to-one communication via private message as well as chat and data transfers via Direct Client-to-Client.

IRC is used for many different purposes such as obtaining technical support from developers and users, for conducting meetings and even for rolegaming.

Users typically connect to an IRC network using an IRC client. The client takes the raw IRC traffic and turns it into an easy-to-use interface.

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Kodachi 6.0

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GNU
Linux

Linux Kodachi operating system is based on Xubuntu 18.04 it will provide you with a secure, anti-forensic, and anonymous operating system considering all features that a person who is concerned about privacy would need to have in order to be secure.

Kodachi is very easy to use all you have to do is boot it up on your PC via USB drive then you should have a fully running operating system with established VPN connection + Connection established + service running. No setup or knowledge is required from your side we do it all for you. The entire OS is functional from your temporary memory RAM so once you shut it down no trace is left behind all your activities are wiped out.

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Screenshots: Antergos Deepin 19.2 and Redcore Linux 18.12

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GNU
Linux

Challenge Accepted: An Adventure in Linux Part 2

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GNU
Linux

One week into this challenge and I must say that I have been enjoying this experience. Though the shortcuts configured for Elementary OS have given me a bit of a trying time.

I know that in an ideal world every operating system would magically be configured in the exact way that we wanted right from install. However, as we all have different workflows, this may be an unrealistic hope. Once I incorporate the shortcuts into my workflow, I am sure I will enjoy a smooth transition between workspaces and applications overall. If you are following along on the Elementary OS challenge, I would recommend that you take some time to read over the workspace documentation. Over the last week, I have made quite a few changes regarding which hotkeys I am using and adjusting what actions hot-corners will be configured to perform. I am enjoying the experience and can already say I have noticed an increase in my productivity.

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Can the Pinebook Pro Linux deliver where others fail?

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GNU
Linux
Gadgets

When everything went online, the need to have an all-powerful computer was no longer that urgent. Today, we can do everything online - from writing, to picture editing, to entertainment and much more.

Tablets became the next best thing, but they, in rather dramatic fashion, proved to be a fad.

These days you rarely see them, gone was the time when everyone was dying to be seen with one. This made way for hybrids, though to be fair, tablets opened the path to low-end computers going mainstream.

This is where the Pinebook comes into existence. Sure, they market it as a tinkerer’s laptop, but, it is, in every sense, a fully working laptop, and by the looks of it, the best contender available to Chromebooks.

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Also: Raspberry Pi Opens Its First Offline Retail Store In UK

GRUB 2.04 Is On The Way This Year Along With Other New Bootloader Feature

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GNU

Daniel Kiper of Oracle presented at last week's FOSDEM European conference on the latest upstream work happening around the GRUB boot-loader.

Before getting to the latest changes and plans, this Oracle software developer and GRUB maintainer first recapped some of the highlights of 2018. Improvements there as a reminder included a lot of ARM work, support for multiple early initrd images, Btrfs improvements around supporting Zstd and RAID, UEFI Secure Boot shim support, the verifiers framework, Xen PVH support, UEFI TPM 1.2/2.0 support, and other improvements.

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FSF on Vikings and GIMP on "Mac"-Branded PCs

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GNU
  • FSF Certifies Another New But Old Re-Branded Opteron Board For Its Freedom

    The Free Software Foundation (FSF) has certified the Vikings D8 motherboard and D8 workstation as they "Respect Your Freedom" as the newest endorsed hardware.

    The Vikings D8 is a re-branded ASUS KCMA-D8 but flashed with Libreboot+Coreboot to free the hardware down to the BIOS. The ASUS KCMA-D8 supports two AMD Opteron 4100 series processors, DDR3-1333 UDIMM/RDIMms, and one PCI Express 2.0 x16 slot, among other PCIe ports.

  • Vikings D8 Mainboard and D8 Workstation now FSF-certified to Respect Your Freedom

    These are the fourth and fifth devices from Vikings GmbH to receive RYF certification. The Vikings D8 Mainboard is an ASUS KCMA-D8 that comes with Trisquel GNU/Linux. Like the previously certified Vikings D16, it is a powerful mainboard suitable for use as a workstation or server. The Vikings D8 Workstation brings the D8 Mainboard together with a variety of options to provide a robust workstation for users. Both are available for purchase at https://store.vikings.net.

    "The more options users have for RYF-certified mainboards, the easier it is for them to build a machine that is completely under their control. Having an already assembled workstation available as an option is also a great improvement to the program. This is an area in which we hope to see continued growth, so that every user can get what they want when it comes to a server or workstation," said the FSF's licensing and compliance manager, Donald Robertson, III.

    Vikings GmbH received their first three certifications in spring of 2017, and has steadily worked to continue offering new RYF-certifiable devices.

  • GIMP 2.10.6 working on MacOS Leopard!

    My white MacBook is a perfectly fine computer, has an excellent screen and keyboard (superior to later models I have) so even if it is running a legacy OS version, I'd love to continue using it and, perhaps, other of you are in the same situation.

    Besides ArcticFox (which I got running on 10.6, but not on 10.5 yet) and various developer tools, the most essential tool I like to have is GIMP, also given the excellent LCD this Laptop has.

7 Excellent Console Linux File Managers (Updated 2019)

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GNU
Linux

Console based applications are light on system resources (very useful on low specified machines), can be faster and more efficient than their graphical counterparts, they do not stop working when X is restarted, and are perfect for scripting purposes. When designed well, console applications offer a surprisingly improvement in productivity. The applications are leaner, faster, easier to maintain, and remove the need to have installed a whole raft of libraries.

The whole is greater than the sum of its parts is a very famous quote from Aristotle, a Greek philosopher and scientist. This quote is particularly pertinent to Linux. In my view, one of Linux’s biggest strengths is its synergy. The usefulness of Linux doesn’t derive only from the huge raft of open source (command line) utilities. Instead, it’s the synergy generated by using them together, sometimes in conjunction with larger applications.

So what does the command-line offer users. There is a wide range of console based software which provide the same or similar functionality to their graphical equivalents. In the field of system administration, Linux is blessed with a good range of graphical file managers. However, some users are in their comfort zone managing files from the shell, finding it the fastest way to navigate the file system and perform file operations. This is in part because console based file managers are more keyboard friendly, enabling users to perform file operations without using a mouse, and make it quicker to navigate the filesystem and issue commands in the console at the same time.

Some people may prefer to use the shell instead of a console file manager. We covered some great tools that let you navigate the file system quickly – check out 7 Best Command Line Navigation Tools.

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More in Tux Machines

KDE is adding Matrix to its instant messaging infrastructure

KDE has been looking for a better way of chatting and live-sharing information for several years now. IRC has been a good solution for a long time, but it has centralized servers KDE cannot control. It is also insecure and lacks features users have come to expect from more modern IM services. Other alternatives, such as Telegram, Slack and Discord, although feature-rich, are centralized and built around closed-source technologies and offer even less control than IRC. This flies in the face of KDE's principles that require we use and support technologies based on Free software. However, our search for a better solution has finally come to an end: as of today we are officially using Matrix for collaboration within KDE! Matrix is an open protocol and network for decentralised communication, backed by an open standard and open source reference implementations for servers, clients, client SDKs, bridges, bots and more. It provides all the features you’d expect from a modern chat system: infinite scrollback, file transfer, typing notifications, read receipts, presence, search, push notifications, stickers, VoIP calling and conferencing, etc. It even provides end-to-end encryption (based on Signal’s double ratchet algorithm) for when you want some privacy. Read more Also: KDE To Support Matrix Decentralized Instant Messaging

Android Leftovers

Canonical Is Planning Some Awesome New Content For The Snap Store

There I was, thoughtfully drafting an article titled "3 Things Canonical Can Do To Improve The Snap Ecosystem," when I jumped on the phone with Evan Dandrea, an Engineering Manager who just so happens to be responsible for the Snapcraft ecosystem at Canonical. As it turns out, that headline will need a slight edit. One less number. That's because I've just learned Canonical has some ambitious plans for the future of the Snap Store. Read more

Extensive Benchmarks Looking At AMD Znver1 GCC 9 Performance, EPYC Compiler Tuning

With the GCC 9 compiler due to be officially released as stable in the next month or two, we've been running benchmarks of this near-final state to the GNU Compiler Collection on a diverse range of processors. In recent weeks that has included extensive compiler benchmarks on a dozen x86_64 systems, POWER9 compiler testing on the Talos II, and also the AArch64 compiler performance on recent releases of GCC and LLVM Clang. In this latest installment of our GCC 9 compiler benchmarking is an extensive look at the AMD EPYC Znver1 performance on various releases of the GCC compiler as well as looking at various optimization levels under this new compiler on the Znver1 processor. Read more