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5 Business Tools for Start-ups Running on Linux in 2019

Filed under
GNU
Linux

There is no denying that Linux offers more flexibility and security than Microsoft Windows. However, if you use a Linux system for your business, then there is no need to compromise on productivity. The following are some of the most amazing business tools for Linux OS that you can use to enhance business operations and reduce costs:

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If You Are a Linux User, Make Your Next PC Powered By AMD

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

While I was searching for a new on-budget laptop to buy, especially after my Lenovo Thinkpad x260 almost died, I did a lot of research specifically about what CPU & GPU vendors to choose, mainly because I use Linux only and I was worried about some rumors of compatibility and other issues.

At the end I chose AMD, and I bought a laptop powered by AMD. My experience with it on Linux has been wonderful so far. This is my story, and why I think that you should go with AMD for your next PC too.

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Best Linux Distro for Windows 7 Refugees: Manjaro KDE

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Manjaro is based off of Arch Linux, but I like to describe it to people as the “Ubuntu of Arch” for its user-friendly design choices and its particular attention to helping new Linux users to learn what they are doing. Another great perk of the Arch foundation underneath Manjaro is the use of the Arch Linux Wiki.

The Arch wiki is easily one of the largest resources of help, information, and know-how for all Linux users— regardless of distribution, many of the articles found can be applied.

Back in the spring of 2017 I wrote a series of articles discussing various Desktop Environments for Linux systems, such as Cinnamon and KDE just to name a couple, and overall for Windows users who have decided to take the plunge, I’m recommending KDE.

Regardless of distribution, KDE is filled with eye candy, is highly-customizable, one of the most powerful file-browsers available (Dolphin), and is deeply documented with a long-standing history (KDE was created in 1996).

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What is POSIX? Richard Stallman explains

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GNU
Interviews

What is POSIX, and why does it matter? It's a term you've likely seen in technical writing, but it often gets lost in a sea of techno-initialisms and jargon-that-ends-in-X. I emailed Dr. Richard Stallman (better known in hacker circles as RMS) to find out more about the term's origin and the concept behind it.

Richard Stallman says "open" and "closed" are the wrong way to classify software. Stallman classifies programs as freedom-respecting ("free" or "libre") and freedom-trampling ("non-free" or "proprietary"). Open source discourse typically encourages certain practices for the sake of practical advantages, not as a moral imperative.

The free software movement, which Stallman launched in 1984, says more than advantages are at stake. Users of computers deserve control of their computing, so programs denying users control are an injustice to be rejected and eliminated. For users to have control, the program must give them the four essential freedoms...

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Feren OS July 2019 Snapshot has been released

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GNU
Linux

It?s been 3 months since the last Snapshot, so? if you don?t know what that means: It calls for a New Feren OS Snapshot, and it?s now released for the 64 Bit Architecture and the 32 Bit Architecture.

This release comes with a set of minor changes and improvements over the April 2019 Snapshot, with the most noteworthy changes that users will notice summarised below.

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Lightweight i3 developer desktop with OSTree and chroots

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GNU
Linux

I’ve always liked a clean, slim, lightweight, and robust OS on my laptop (which is my only PC) – I’ve been running the i3 window manager for years, with some custom configuration to enable the Fn keys and set up my preferred desktop session layout. Initially on Ubuntu, for the last two and a half years under Fedora (since I moved to Red Hat). I started with a minimal server install and then had a post-install script that installed the packages that I need, restore my /etc files from git, and some other minor bits.

But over time there’s always some cruft that accumulates – that quick and dirty sudo make install to test some upstream project, some global pip install, or simply the increasing delta coming from upgrading through many OS releases.

Immutable OS installs with atomic upgrades are very appealing to me, as they are always “clean”, and more importantly, they enforce not taking shortcuts during development and scribbling over /usr. But the known ones – Fedora Silverblue or Ubuntu Core – demand using Flatpaks or snaps, which I really don’t believe in and want to avoid.

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Linux Mint 19.2 Beta Cinnamon

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GNU
Linux

Today we are looking at Linux Mint 19.2 Beta, the cinnamon edition. It comes with Cinnamon 4.2 and Nemo 4.2, which is the first point release after Cinnamon 4.0, so as we can expect this whole release is mainly bug fixes and smoothing things out and it is truly a great smooth release, and it is only the Beta!

It comes with Linux Kernel 5.15 and it uses about 800-1000MB of Ram when idling.

This Beta release is about a month later than usual as it was a difficult release cycle if you look at their last couple of monthly newsletters, but they did promise a very good release, and that is what we received. So thank you to the Linux Mint team!

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Direct/video: Linux Mint 19.2 Beta Cinnamon Run Through

antiX-19-b2-full (64 and 32 bit) available

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GNU
Linux

Our second beta build of the upcoming antiX-19 release, based on Debian Buster and systemd-free.

Changes since beta1.

* Inclusion of connman-bluetooth-firmware
* New app – App Select – Quickly find all installed apps.
* 4.9.182 ‘Sack Panic’ patched kernel
* New ‘antiX’ category added to menu
* New themes, icons and wallpaper
* Various bugfixes.

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Some Cool Applications Developed by TeejeeTech!

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GNU
Linux
Software

Linux is a kernel that is currently experiencing many developments. As a user, we might want to try other kernels or upgrade the latest kernel to a computer system. Users need to be careful when changing the kernel, because this section is one of the important parts of a computer system.

But you can use Ukuu to make it easier to install and replace the kernel, because this application is an easy-to-use GUI Tool.

Based on the information I got on the Teejectech web, Starting from version 19.01, Ukuu turned into a paid license. This is because of the lack of donations needed to continue developing this application. But for those of you who have donated to Ukuu in the past, you can contact Teejeetech via email if you want to request a paid license from this application.

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Towards Guix for DevOps

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GNU

Hey, there! I'm Jakob, a Google Summer of Code intern and new contributor to Guix. Since May, I've been working on a DevOps automation tool for the Guix System, which we've been calling guix deploy.

The idea for a Guix DevOps tool has been making rounds on the mailing lists for some time now. Years, in fact; Dave Thompson and Chris Webber put together a proof-of-concept for it way back in 2015. Thus, we've had plenty of time to gaze upon the existing tools for this sort of thing -- Ansible, NixOps -- and fantasize about a similar tool, albeit with the expressive power of Guile scheme and the wonderful system configuration facilities of Guix. And now, those fantasies are becoming a reality.

"DevOps" is a term that might be unfamiliar to a fair number of Guix users. I'll spare you the detour to Wikipedia and give a brief explanation of what guix deploy does.

Imagine that you've spent the afternoon playing around with Guile's (web) module, developing software for a web forum. Awesome! But a web forum with no users is pretty boring, so you decide to shell out a couple bucks for a virtual private server to run your web forum. You feel that Wildebeest admirers on the internet deserve a platform of their own for discussion, and decide to dedicate the forum to that.

As it turns out, C. gnou is a more popular topic than you ever would have imagined. Your web forum soon grows in size -- attracting hundreds of thousands of simultaneous users. Despite Guile's impressive performance characteristics, one lowly virtual machine is too feeble to support such a large population of Wildebeest fanatics. So you decide to use Apache as a load-balancer, and shell out a couple more bucks for a couple more virtual private servers. Now you've got a problem on your hands; you're the proud owner of five or so virtual machines, and you need to make sure they're all running the most recent version of either your web forum software or Apache.

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