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GNU

Stretchly – An Open-Source, Customizable Time Reminder App

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

We have covered several time apps including Chronobreak, Gnome P0modoro, and Thomas. Today’s featured timer app goes by the name of Stretchly and it is among the most customizable timer apps on the free market.

Stretchly is an open-source project that reminds its users to take breaks from working on the computer. It runs in the system tray and displays a prompt for you to take a 20-second break every 10 minutes by default.

Its app window uses a minimalist design UI with informative text, and tons of customization options including break duration, alert tones, and strict mode. Stretchly allows you to cut breaks short and return to work, enabling strict mode will disable that feature.

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Sysget – A Front-end For Popular Package Managers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

Are you a distro-hopper who likes to try new Linux OSs every few days? If so, I have something for you. Say hello to Sysget, a front-end for popular package managers in Unix-like operating systems. You don’t need to learn about every package managers to do basic stuffs like installing, updating, upgrading and removing packages. You just need to remember one syntax for every package manager on every Unix-like operating systems. Sysget is a wrapper script for package managers and it is written in C++.

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10 Reasons to Use Manjaro Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Manjaro Linux has been trending in Linux communities and even beyond for over a year now. One, for its beauty, and two, for its success at simplifying many of the overly-technical aspects in Arch Linux e.g. installation.

If you are among those on the fence and aren’t sure of why you should switch to using Manjaro Linux then here are 10 reasons to convince you.

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Four Web Browsers for the Linux Command Line

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Web

Remember the days when the web was as simple as searchable text. The terminals and low powered personal computers were enough to access the text-based web over snail-paced internet connections. Of course, people then used the command-line web browsers to visit the web; these included the famous Lynx browser as well. Times have changed now, the browser technology has shifted to the graphical and more powerful web-browsers such as Chrome, Firefox and, Safari. Still, there are people who are more Terminal savvy and prefer accessing to-the-point information from the web through Terminal based browsing. Even Terminal based computers also exist and for them, command-line browsers are sometimes the only way to connect to the web. So how do we install and use these text-based browsers through our Linux command-line, the Terminal?

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GCC 6.5 Status Report

Filed under
Development
GNU
  • GCC 6.5 Status Report (2018-10-12)

    It is now time to release GCC 6.5 and close the 6.x branch. If you have regression bugfixes or documentation fixes that should be still backported to the branch, please test them and check them in before Friday, October 19th, when I'd like to create a Release Candidate of 6.5.

  • GCC 6.5 Is Being Prepared As The Last GCC6 Compiler Release

    Version 6.5 of the GNU Compiler Collection will soon be released to end out the GCC6 series.

    GCC8 remains the latest stable series and GCC9 is in development for release in early 2019. For those still relying upon the two-year-old GCC6 stable series, GCC 6.5 is being prepared with a last serving of bug/regression fixes before closing off that branch.

FOSS Project Spotlight: Tutanota, the First Encrypted Email Service with an App on F-Droid

Filed under
GNU

Seven years ago, we started building Tutanota, an encrypted email service with a strong focus on security, privacy and open source. Long before the Snowden revelations, we felt there was a need for easy-to-use encryption that would allow everyone to communicate online without being snooped upon.

As developers, we know how easy it is to spy on email that travels through the web. Email, with its federated setup is great, and that's why it has become the main form of online communication and still is. However, from a security perspective, the federated setup is troublesome—to say the least.

End-to-end encrypted email is difficult to handle on desktops (with key generation, key sharing, secure storing of keys and so on), and it's close to impossible on mobile devices. For the average, not so tech-savvy internet user, there are a lot of pitfalls, and the probability of doing something wrong is, unfortunately, rather high.

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GCC: Optimizing Linux, the Internet, and Everything

Filed under
Development
GNU

Software is useless if computers can't run it. Even the most talented developer is at the mercy of the compiler when it comes to run-time performance - if you don’t have a reliable compiler toolchain you can’t build anything serious. The GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) provides a robust, mature and high performance partner to help you get the most out of your software. With decades of development by thousands of people GCC is one of the most respected compilers in the world. If you are building applications and not using GCC, you are missing out on the best possible solution.

GCC is the “de facto-standard open source compiler today” [1] according to LLVM.org and the foundation used to build complete systems - from the kernel upwards. GCC supports over 60 hardware platforms, including ARM, Intel, AMD, IBM POWER, SPARC, HP PA-RISC, and IBM Z, as well as a variety of operating environments, including GNU, Linux, Windows, macOS, FreeBSD, NetBSD, OpenBSD, DragonFly BSD, Solaris, AIX, HP-UX, and RTEMS. It offers highly compliant C/C++ compilers and support for popular C libraries, such as GNU C Library (glibc), Newlib, musl, and the C libraries included with various BSD operating systems, as well as front-ends for Fortran, Ada, and GO languages. GCC also functions as a cross compiler, creating executable code for a platform other than the one on which the compiler is running. GCC is the core component of the tightly integrated GNU toolchain, produced by the GNU Project, that includes glibc, Binutils, and the GNU Debugger (GDB).

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Also: AMDGPU Developer Proposes Array Register Files For LLVM - Would Help Performance

GNU: GNU Guix, GNU Guile, Parabola GNU/Linux-libre

Filed under
GNU
  • GNU Guix: A packaging tutorial for Guix

    GNU Guix stands out as the hackable package manager, mostly because it uses GNU Guile, a powerful high-level programming language, one of the Scheme dialects from the Lisp family.

    Package definitions are also written in Scheme, which empowers Guix in some very unique ways, unlike most other package managers that use shell scripts or simple languages.

  • GNU Guile 2.9.1 (beta) released

    We are delighted to announce GNU Guile 2.9.1, the first beta release in preparation for the upcoming 3.0 stable series.

    This release adds support for just-in-time (JIT) native code generation, speeding up all Guile programs. Currently support is limited to x86-64 platforms, but will expand to all architectures supported by GNU Lightning.

  • Parabola GNU/Linux-libre: Important notice for OpenRC users on i686

    To avoid any trouble, you should explicitly install the 'audit' package before attempting to upgrade the system. If you upgrade without first installing the 'audit' package, then you will need to chroot into the system and install it.

UberWriter – A Feature-Rich GTK+ Markdown Editor

Filed under
GNU
Linux

One of the reasons Markdown is a very popular language is its flexibility. It is used by people from different walks of life including lecturers, research scientists, web developers, bloggers, and technical writers and developers are doing a good job of making various app choices available to the public.

Today, we’re adding yet another Markdown editor to our list and it is one we suggest that you check out.

UberWriter is free, open-source, GTK-based, and filled with tons of features that make writing, especially in Markdown, a stress-free experience. It was developed by one who enjoys writing in Markdown and decided to create an app that will make the experience enjoyable for others.

UberWriter features a clean, modern, minimalist UI with a hamburger menu in its toolbar. In the bottom bar, it displays the word and character count on the right, and its screen modes on the left, Focus Mode, Fullscreen, and Preview.

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PiCluster 2.4 is out!

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I am pleased to announce that a new version of PiCluster is out with some nice improvements. PiCluster aims to provide an easy-to-use solution to manage your Docker containers across multiple nodes. Let’s see what is new in this release.

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More in Tux Machines

Plasma 5.14.2

Today KDE releases a Bugfix update to KDE Plasma 5, versioned 5.14.2. Plasma 5.14 was released in October with many feature refinements and new modules to complete the desktop experience. Read more Also: KDE Plasma 5.14.2 Desktop Environment Improves Firmware Updates, Snap Support

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

  • Red Hat: Creativity is risky (and other truths open leaders need to hear)
    Leaders are all too aware of the importance of invention and innovation. Today, the health and wealth of their businesses have become increasingly dependent on the creation of new products and processes. In the digital age especially, competition is more fierce than ever as global markets open and expand. Just keeping pace with change requires a focus on constant improvement and consistent learning. And that says nothing about building for tomorrow.
  • APAC Financial Services Institutions Bank on Red Hat to Enhance Agility
  • APAC banks aim to use open source to enhance agility
  • Huawei CloudFabric Supports Container Network Deployment Automation, Improving Enterprise Service Agility
    At HUAWEI CONNECT 2018, Huawei announced that its CloudFabric Cloud Data Center Solution supports container network deployment automation and will be available for the industry-leading enterprise Kubernetes platform via a new plug-in.
  • Redis Labs Integrates With Red Hat OpenShift, Hits 1B Milestone
    Redis Labs is integrating its enterprise platform as a hosted and managed database service on Red Hat’s OpenShift Container Platform. That integration includes built-in support for Red Hat’s recently launched Kubernetes Operator. The Redis Enterprise integration will allow customers to deploy and manage Redis databases as a stateful Kubernetes service. It will also allow users to run Redis Enterprise on premises or across any cloud environment.
  • Needham & Company Starts Red Hat (RHT) at Buy
  • Fedora Toolbox — Hacking on Fedora Silverblue
    Fedora Silverblue is a modern and graphical operating system targetted at laptops, tablets and desktop computers. It is the next-generation Fedora Workstation that promises painless upgrades, clear separation between the OS and applications, and secure and cross-platform applications. The basic operating system is an immutable OSTree image, and all the applications are Flatpaks. It’s great! However, if you are a hacker and decide to set up a development environment, you immediately run into the immutable OS image and the absence of dnf. You can’t install your favourite tools, editors and SDKs the way you’d normally do on Fedora Workstation. You can either unlock your immutable OS image to install RPMs through rpm-ostree and give up the benefit of painless upgrades; or create a Docker container to get an RPM-based toolbox but be prepared to mess around with root permissions and having to figure out why your SSH agent or display server isn’t working.
  • Fedora 28 : Alien, Steam and Fedora distro.

Raspberry Pi: Hands-on with the updated Raspbian Linux

wrote last week about the new Raspbian Linux release, but in that post I was mostly concerned with the disappearance of the Wolfram (and Mathematica) packages, and I didn't really do justice to the release itself. So now I have continued with installing or upgrading it on all of my Raspberry Pi systems, and this post will concentrate on the process and results from that. First, the new ISO images are available from the Raspberry Pi Downloads page (as always), and the Release Notes have been added to the usual text document. I have only downloaded the plain Raspbian images, I don't bother with the NOOBS images much any more - but the new ISO is included in those as well of course. Please note that the SHA-256 checksum for the images is given on the web page, so be sure to verify that before you continue with the file that you downloaded. If you prefer stronger (or weaker) verification, you can find a PGP signature (and an SHA-1 checksum) on the Raspbian images download page. Read more

Ubuntu: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Release, Official Ubuntu 18.10 T-Shirt and Pop!_OS 18.10 Release

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 550
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 550
    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 550 for the week of October 14 – 20, 2018.
  • Ubuntu 18.10 is a Cosmic Cuttlefish of new Linux loveliness
    CANONICAL HAS announced the release of its bi-annual update to the Ubuntu operating system. Ubuntu 18.10, aka Cosmic Cuttlefish, is out now. It's not a long-term version so this is more aimed at individual users, as companies prefer to wait for an LTS to commit. So what's new in this build? Well, one of the biggest bugbears - graphics driver updating - has been addressed, so there'll be no more of all that sideloading the updates nonsense. Canonical has confirmed that this simpler process will get a graphical clicky interface, but not until (probably) version 19.x. But in the meantime, the way Ubuntu uses RAM for graphics has been given a kicking and should be a lot more efficient for migrating gamers.
  • Ubuntu 18.10 Cosmic Cuttlefish is now ready to download
    It’s October which means that we were due an Ubuntu release and Canonical hasn’t failed us this time around. Starting now, users who want to download Ubuntu 18.10 Cosmic Cuttlefish can do so. The latest version of the popular Linux distribution is only supported for nine months, until July 2019, with it being an inter-LTS release, therefore, you may want to consider sticking with Ubuntu 18.04 LTS on your mission-critical systems. Ubuntu 18.10 is no small release; out-of-the-box users will be greeted with a new theme dubbed Yaru and a new icon theme called Suru. It marks the first time that the distribution has received a significant overhaul since Ubuntu 10.10 when Canonical, the firm that makes Ubuntu, decided to throw out the brown colour scheme in favour of the purple, orange, and black theme we’re all now so used to.
  • You Can Now Buy an Official Ubuntu 18.10 T-Shirt
    The reverse of each 100% cotton tee bears the Ubuntu brand mark and text that reads “Cosmic Cuttlefish 18.10”. The shirt is both unisex and available in sizes small through quad XL. This should ensure there’s a comfy fit for virtually everyone (though, alas, not me – I’m an XS, and “small” is just too dang big). As well as making a great xmas gift idea an Ubuntu-loving loved one, the shirt is also a novel way to communicate your computing preferences to the wider world as you go about your shopping in Walmart, or as a certified conversation starter at tech conferences.
  • System76 releases Ubuntu-based Pop!_OS 18.10 Linux distribution
    System76 is making huge moves lately. The company used to just sell re-branded computers running Ubuntu, and while there was nothing wrong with that, it has much more lofty goals. You see, it released its own Ubuntu-based operating system called "Pop!_OS," and now, it is preparing to release its own self-designed and built open source computers. In other words, much like Apple, System76 is maintaining both the software and hardware aspects of the customer experience. While its new hardware is not yet available, the latest version of its operating system is. Following the release of Ubuntu 18.10, Pop!_OS 18.10 is now available for download. While it is based on Ubuntu, it is not merely Canonical's operating system with System76 branding and artwork. Actually, there are some significant customizations that make Pop!_OS its own.