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GNU

Announcing coreboot 4.6

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

We are happy to announce the April 2017 release of coreboot, version 4.6.

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Cinnamon 3.4 released!

Filed under
GNU
Linux

You probably saw the tags on github already. I’m happy to make it official and to announce the release of Cinnamon 3.4.

I’d like to thank all the developers and designers who worked not only on Cinnamon 3.4, but in the redesign of the Spices website and the maintenance of the Cinnamon Spices themselves.

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Mark Shuttleworth Reaffirms Commitment to Desktop, Canonical IPO Talk

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Interviews
Ubuntu
  • Mark Shuttleworth: Ubuntu on the Desktop Will Remain Important to Canonical

    The OpenStack Summit 2017 event kicked off today in Boston, MA, and Canonical's CEO Mark Shuttleworth was there to discuss the upcoming plans for Ubuntu on the desktop, cloud computing, and IoT (Internet of Things).

    The Canonical and Ubuntu founder was interviewed there by theCUBE, who were very curious to know what is the state of Ubuntu Linux these days, now that Mark Shuttleworth shocked the Open Source community when he announced last month that development of the Unity interface is shut down, along with the convergence vision.

  • Mark Shuttleworth Says Ubuntu Desktop “Remains Really Important”

    Mark Shuttleworth has reiterated that the Ubuntu desktop “remains really important” to Canonical.

    He made the comments in an interview with The Cube at the OpenStack Summit 2017 taking place in the USA this week.

    Asked to describe the current state of Ubuntu following last month’s announcement that Canonical is to end investment in Ubuntu Phone, Unity 8, convergence, the Ubuntu founder admitted that Ubuntu ‘failed’ to take Ubuntu mainstream in personal computing.

  • My Current Ubuntu Desktop (And How You Can Recreate It)

    As you may have heard me mention in the latest episode of the Ubuntu Podcast, I’ve been ankle deep in GNOME extensions these past few weeks. Why? Well, like many of you I have made a preëmptive switch to GNOME Shell now that Unity is being left to the cobwebs.

  • Canonical starts IPO path

    At OpenStack Summit, Canonical and Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth revealed in an interview that the recent changes in the Linux and cloud power were to ready Canonical for an IPO.

    In early April, Shuttleworth announced Ubuntu Linux was ending its " investment in Unity8, the phone and convergence shell." Ubuntu had long been a cloud power, and it's been building its Internet of Things (IoT) reputation. Soon thereafter, Canonical CEO Jane Silber announced she was stepping down and that Shuttleworth would return as CEO.

Chuwi LapBook 12.3 is a 2K Ubuntu Laptop for $329

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Chinese computer company Chuwi plan to release an Ubuntu powered laptop.

The Chuwi LapBook 12.3 is a thin, all-metal clamshell notebook with a 12.3-inch 2K display.

Never heard of Chuwi? Me either.

Though the company is far from a household name it carving out a name for its self making a slate of well-received Windows 10 tablets, and 2-in-1’s — one of which even dual-boots with Android.

And now they’re apparently turning their attention to Ubuntu.

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ExTiX 17.5 Looks to Be the First GNU/Linux OS Shipping with Linux Kernel 4.11

Filed under
GNU
Linux

GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton is once again the first to built a Linux-based operating system powered by the latest stable kernel, and today he announced the availability of ExTiX 17.5 Build 170508 using the Linux 4.11 kernel.

To our knowledge, ExTiX 17.5 Build 170508 looks to be the first stable, production-ready GNU/Linux distribution to ship with Linux kernel 4.11. The operating system is dubbed by the developer "The Ultimate Linux System" for a reason, and today's release is based on packages from Debian GNU/Linux 8.7 "Jessie," Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" and Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus).

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Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11 Launches with Flatpak Support, GNOME 3.18 Desktop

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GNU
Linux

PC/OpenSystems LLC and Black Lab Software are proud to announce today the release and immediate availability for download of the Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11 operating system.

Now that netOS become Black Lab Enterprise Linux, and that the OS is free for download again, the team prepared the latest release with dozens of exciting new features and several flavors. Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11 appears to be the first stable series to ship with Black Lab Studio Linux, Black Lab Enterprise Linux for Education, and Black Lab Enterprise Linux for IoT editions.

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Arch-based Releases and Deaths

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Chakra GNU/Linux Users Get KDE Plasma 5.9.5 Desktop Environment and Wine 2.7

    The development team behind the Chakra GNU/Linux operating system, through Neofytos Kolokotronis, is reporting on the latest updates that landed in the stable software repositories of the GNU/Linux distribution.

    Chakra GNU/Linux users will be glad to learn that the latest KDE Plasma 5.9.5 desktop environment, which is the last maintenance update in the series, has landed in the repos, bringing them a great number of patches for their beloved KDE apps and utilities.

  • Arch Linux Based Apricity OS Shuts Down

    The Arch Linux based distribution, Apricity OS, has announced in an undated notice on its website that it’s shutting down. I learned the of news today when given a heads-up by a follower on Twitter.

  • Arch Linux-Based Apricity OS GNU/Linux Distribution Is Now Officially Dead

    We're extremely sorry to inform our readers that the team of developers behind the Apricity OS has ceased the development of the Arch Linux-based operating system.

    We were the first to introduce you guys to Apricity OS about 20 months ago, on the 6th of September, 2015, and, shortly after, the GNU/Linux distro become hugely popular among those who wanted to install an Arch Linux-based operating system on their personal computer with an easy-to-use graphical interface.

Why the Largest Companies in the World Count on Linux Servers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

Linux started its life in the data center as a cheaper alternative to UNIX. At the time, UNIX operating systems ruled the industry and for good reason. They were performant, fault tolerant and extremely stable. They also were very expensive and ran on very proprietary hardware. A lot of the familiar utilities and applications developed for those UNIX platforms eventually were ported over to Linux. So, once Linux ran services like Apache, it came as no surprise that Linux would usurp and replace the very same technologies that once inspired its creation. The very best part was that Linux ran on commodity x86 hardware. At the end of the day, anyone could deploy a Linux server at a fraction of the cost to deploy something from Sun Microsystems, Silicon Graphics (SGI) or from any other UNIX distributor.

Fast-forward to the present, and Linux continues to maintain a strong competitive lead over other server offerings, including the very popular Microsoft Windows. But why is that the case? In order to answer that question, one first must understand what Linux is.

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4MLinux 21.2 Distro Released with Linux Kernel 4.4.63 LTS, Wi-Fi AP Improvements

Filed under
GNU
Linux

4MLinux developer Zbigniew Konojacki is informing us today about the immediate availability of the second point release of the 4MLinux 21 GNU/Linux operating system.

4MLinux 21.2 is yet another minor update of the independently-developed distribution, coming about five weeks after the 4MLinux 21.1 release. It's here with a new kernel from the long-term supported Linux 4.4 series, namely Linux kernel 4.4.63 LTS, a bunch of updated packages, and better support for wireless APs that are protected with passwords.

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Also: OSMC's April update is here

Desktop GNU/Linux: Galago Pro, Chromebook, Building One's Own, and Rolling Releases

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Galago Pro on the Go: Emma's System76 Laptop Review

    I'm so excited to talk about this little precious Galago Pro! I like to name my laptops, and nothing is more fitting for this machine (in my use case) than the name ‘Princess’ because my experience with the Galago so far has been royally spectacular. After more than a month of frequent use, I’ve found the Galago to be an excellent choice for the mobile worker. I’m frequently on a train, plane or bus, so portability is an absolute must-have for me. Although the portability is my favorite feature, I’m fond of a few other things the Galago Pro has to offer.

  • Chromebook shipments surge by 38 percent, cutting into Windows 10 PCs
  • Building a "real" Linux distro

    I recently saw a post on Hacker News: “Build yourself a Linux”, a cool project that guides you through building a simple Linux system. It’s similar to Linux from Scratch in that it helps you build a simple Linux system for personal use. I’d like to supplement this with some insight into my experience with a more difficult task: building a full blown Linux distribution. The result is agunix, the “silver unix” system.

    For many years I’ve been frustrated with every distribution I’ve tried. Many of them have compelling features and design, but there’s always a catch. The popular distros are stable and portable, but cons include bloat, frequent use of GNU, systemd, and often apt. Some more niche distros generally have good points but often have some combination of GNU, an init system I don’t like, poor docs, dynamic linking, or an overall amateurish or incomplete design. Many of them are tolerable, but none have completely aligned with my desires.

    I’ve also looked at not-Linux - I have plenty of beefs with the Linux kernel. I like the BSD kernels, but I dislike the userspaces (though NetBSD is pretty good) I like the microkernel design of Minix, but it’s too unstable and has shit hardware support. plan9/9front has the most elegant kernel and userspace design ever made, but it’s not POSIX and has shit hardware support. Though none of these userspaces are for me, I intend to attempt a port of the agunix userspace to all of their kernels at some point (a KFreeBSD port is underway).

  • Ubuntu, Arch and Rolling vs Fixed Linux Releases
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OSS Leftovers

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    Nextcloud informs Softpedia today about the official availability of the final release of Nextcloud 12, a major milestone of the self-hosting cloud server technology that introduces numerous new features and improvements. The biggest new feature of the Nextcloud 12 release appears to be the introduction of a new architecture for massive scalability, called Global Scale, which is a next-generation open-source technology for syncing and sharing files. Global Scale increases scalability from tens of thousands of users to hundreds of millions on a single instance, while helping universities and other institutions significantly reduce the costs of their existing large installations.
  • ReactOS 0.4.5 Open-Source Windows-Compatible OS Launches with Many Improvements
    ReactOS 0.4.5 is a maintenance update that adds numerous changes and improvements over the previous point release. The kernel has been updated in this version to improve the FreeLoader and UEFI booting, as well as the Plug and Play modules, adding support for more computers to boot ReactOS without issues.
  • Sprint Debuts Open Source NFV/SDN Platform Developed with Intel Labs
    AT&T has been the headliner in the carrier race to software defined networking (SDN) and network function virtualization (NFV). But Sprint is putting its own stamp on the space this week with its debut of a new open source SDN/NFV mobile core solution.
  • Google’s New Home for All Things Open Source Runs Deep
    Google is not only one of the biggest contributors to the open source community but also has a strong track record of delivering open source tools and platforms that give birth to robust technology ecosystems. Just witness the momentum that Android and Kubernetes now have. Recently, Google launched a new home for its open source projects, processes, and initiatives. The site runs deep and has several avenues worth investigating. Here is a tour and some highlights worth noting.
  • Making your first open source contribution
  • Simplify expense reports with Smart Receipts
    The app is called Smart Receipts, it's licensed AGPL 3.0, and the source code is available on GitHub for Android and iOS.
  • How the TensorFlow team handles open source support
    Open-sourcing is more than throwing code over the wall and hoping somebody uses it. I knew this in theory, but being part of the TensorFlow team at Google has opened my eyes to how many different elements you need to build a community around a piece of software.
  • IRC for the 21st Century: Introducing Riot
    Internet relay chat (IRC) is one of the oldest chat protocols around and still popular in many open source communities. IRC's best strengths are as a decentralized and open communication method, making it easy for anyone to participate by running a network of their own. There are also a variety of clients and bots available for IRC.