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Buying Your First Dedicated Linux PC

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GNU
Linux

Now getting back to your main point about finding an affordable Linux PC, let me ask you this – do you still own any of those Macs? Are any of those Macs Intel-based? If you can answer yes to both questions, then perhaps the solution is to consider re-branding these older Macs into working Linux machines. Even a Mac with two GB of RAM could be used to give you a fairly decent Linux box. The more RAM however, the better.

The above option is the most cost-effective choice. However, if you’re starting off from scratch and wish to build your own desktop PC then I’ll share my opinion as to the best approach.

If you’re interested in building your own, I highly recommend the experience. It’s fantastic and in the end, you will end up with vastly better hardware than you would if you were to buy a cheap pre-installed Windows box from Dell.

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FSF/GNU

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GNU
  • GNU Guile 2.0.13 released [security fixes]

    We've just released a new version of GNU Guile, version 2.0.13, which is a security release for Guile (see the original announcement).

    This handles a significant security vulnerability affecting the live REPL, CVE-2016-8606. Due to the nature of this bug, Guile applications themselves in general aren't vulnerable, but Guile developers are. Arbitrary Scheme code may be used to attack your system in this scenario. (A more minor security issue is also addressed, CVE-2016-8605.)

    There is also a lesson here that applies beyond Guile: the presumption that "localhost" is only accessible by local users can't be guaranteed by modern operating system environments. If you are looking to provide local-execution-only, we recommend using Unix domain sockets or named pipes. Don't rely on localhost plus some port.

  • Free Software Directory meeting recap for October 7th, 2016
  • The Free Software Foundation seeks nominations for the 19th annual Free Software Awards

    This award is presented annually by FSF president Richard Stallman to an individual who has made a great contribution to the progress and development of free software, through activities that accord with the spirit of free software.

    Individuals who describe their projects as "open" instead of "free" are eligible nonetheless, provided the software is in fact free/libre.

    Last year, Werner Koch was recognized with the Award for the Advancement of Free Software for his work on GnuPG, the de facto tool for encrypted communication. Koch joined a prestigious list of previous winners including Sébastien Jodogne, Matthew Garrett, Dr. Fernando Perez, Yukihiro Matsumoto, Rob Savoye, John Gilmore, Wietse Venema, Harald Welte, Ted Ts'o, Andrew Tridgell, Theo de Raadt, Alan Cox, Larry Lessig, Guido van Rossum, Brian Paul, Miguel de Icaza, and Larry Wall.

Midi-Pyrenees French Region remains committed to Free Software

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GNU
OSS

“Free software is one of three pillars of our digital strategy”, has confirmed Nadia Pellefigue, the vice-president of the regional council of the Midi-Pyrenees (South-West of France).

“Free software and open source will help the regional industry and employment, because it can mobilise people”, Nadia Pellefigue said. “Public procurement has been spurred but there is still room for improvements”, she added. Cost savings, meaningful local jobs and lower dependencies on foreign firms are the three advantages of free software she listed.

Ms Pellefigue was one of the officials at the Rencontres Régionales du Logiciel Libre (RRLL), which took place in Toulouse in October.

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Parsix GNU/Linux 8.10 "Erik" Receives Latest Security Updates from Debian Stable

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GNU
Linux
Debian

It's been three weeks since the last security updates landed for the Debian-based Parsix GNU/Linux operating system, and today, October 13, 2016, the development team announced the availability of multiple security updates from Debian Stable.

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Why you should try Linux today: 6 compelling reasons

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GNU
Linux

There’s never been a better time to give Linux a try.

Wait, don’t slam on that back button! I’m not one of those rabid “Year of the Linux desktop” types. Windows works just fine for hundreds of millions of people, and—sorry, Linux lovers—there’s little to suggest Linux usage will ever be more than a rounding error compared to Microsoft’s behemoth.

That said, there are some pretty compelling reasons you might want to consider switching to Linux on your computer, or at least give it a hassle-free trial run.

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GNU/Linux Adoption Stories

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GNU
Linux
  • 7 Mistakes New Linux Users Make

    Changing operating systems is a big step for anybody -- all the more so because many users are uncertain about exactly what an operating system is.

    However, switching from Windows to Linux is especially hard. The two operating systems have different assumptions and priorities, as well as different ways of doing things. As a result, it is easy for new Linux users to wind up confused because the expectations they have developed using Windows no longer apply.

  • Distribute And Win

    There are many instances, both in nature and business, of the virtues of distributed systems as compared to monolithic systems. One of the most obvious is the rise of open-source software, as argued persuasively by Eric Raymond in The Cathedral and the Bazaar (available online).

    He argues that “cathedrals” (hierarchical, well-organised companies which are the western norm, e.g., IBM, Microsoft) will in the long run be defeated by “bazaars” (loosely federated groups of workers).

    In the context of operating systems (the software that controls devices), and specifically of the UNIX and Linux systems (which is what Eric was focusing on), this prophecy has largely come true. Microsoft, so dominant in the last century, has now lost its monopoly.

  • Linux And Its Impact On Modern IT Infrastructure

    Linux came into existence 25 years ago, but since then, it has been on the path of evolution, and has crept into the modern IT infrastructure like little else. What started as a rebellion movement of sorts, has now become the backbone of enterprise grade computing for sometime now, and been behind the success stories of more than a few enterprises.

    To gauge the historical link of Linux with enterprise servers, Senior Solutions Architect at Red Hat Martin Percival’s words come to mind, who said “Linux was regarded as an alternative to proprietary Unix. But RHEL switched it to becoming an alternative to Windows Server.” However, when the 90’s came around, computing was to be turned on it’s head, when the consumer segment, more so with PCs, began to take off, even with the famous separation of Microsoft and IBM. While Windows 3.x became a sort of industry standard, IBM’s own OS/OS 2 didn’t create so much of an impression.

PocketCHIP Shipping In Mass Next Month - Makes Fun $69 Debian Linux Handheld

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GNU
Linux
Debian

It's been a few months since Next Thing Co's C.H.I.P. computer was successfully funded on Kickstarter as "the world's first $9 computer" along with the PocketCHIP, a C.H.I.P. powered, battery-backed handheld with physical keyboard. Next Thing Co shipped to their backers over the summer whole in November they expects to begin shipping mass production orders on the CHIP and PocketCHIP. Over the past few weeks I've been playing with these low-cost ARM devices.

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They Said Nobody in Jordan Knew About Linux but They Were Wrong

Filed under
GNU
Linux

In this story, “Roblimo” takes us back to 2002, to an open source conference in a country where the common belief was that “nobody knew anything about Linux.” Boy, were they in for a surprise.

In December, 2002, I gave the keynote speech at an open source conference in Amman, Jordan. It was a tense time in that part of the world. Not long before I was there, the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAISD) chief in Amman was assassinated. Anti-U.S. demonstrations had been shut down by Jordan’s armed forces earlier in the year. King Abdullah II was still new in the job and did not yet have as certain a hand on the helm as his father, Hussein (amateur radio call JY1) did during previous decades. To make things even more fun, the country was flooded with refugees from Iraq, and rumors were rife that the U.S. would soon go to war with Saddam Hussein over 9/11. Or something. Of course, the war rumors turned out to be true.

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ExTiX 16.5 Is the First Stable Distro Based on Ubuntu 16.10 and LXQt 0.10.0

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Today, October 12, 2016, GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton proudly announced the release and immediate availability for download of his brand new ExTiX 16.5 Linux-based distribution for personal computers.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Linux Graphics

  • LibRetro's Vulkan PlayStation PSX Renderer Released
    A few days back I wrote about a Vulkan renderer for a PlayStation emulator being worked on and now the code to that Vulkan renderer is publicly available. For those wanting to relive some PlayStation One games this week or just looking for a new test case for Vulkan drivers, the Vulkan renderer for the LibRetro Beetle/Mednafen PSX emulator is now available, months after the LibRetro folks made a Vulkan renderer for the Nintendo 64 emulator.
  • Etnaviv DRM Updates Submitted For Linux 4.10
    The Etnaviv DRM-Next pull request is not nearly as exciting as MSM getting Adreno 500 series support, a lot of Intel changes, or the numerous AMDGPU changes, but it's not bad either for a community-driven, reverse-engineered DRM driver for the Vivante graphics cores.
  • Mesa 12.0.4 Being Prepped For Ubuntu 16.10/16.04
    Ubuntu is preparing Mesa 12.0.4 for Ubuntu Xenial and Yakkety users. It's not as great as Mesa 13, but at least there are some important fixes back-ported. Mesa 12.0.4 is exciting for dozens of bug fixes, including the work to offer better RadeonSI performance. But with Mesa 12.0.4 you don't have the RADV Vulkan driver, OpenGL 4.5, or the other exciting Mesa 13 work.

Games for GNU/Linux

Mageia 5.1 Released, Tumbleweed's Latest, Most Secure

The Mageia project today announced the release of stopgap version 5.1, an updated "respin" of 5.0 and all updates. The Daily Dot posted their picks for the most sure operating systems and the Hectic Geek is "quite pleased" with Fedora 25. Matthew Garrett chimed in on Ubuntu unofficial images and Dedoimedo reviewed Fedora-based Chapeau 24. Read more