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GNU

In mourning for Nano, chap crafts 1k-loc text editor

Filed under
GNU
OSS

Ticked off by the news that Nano opted out of GNU, a programmer called Salvatore Sanfilippo has written his own text editor.

What's impressive about it is that it provides a basic code editor with syntax highlighting and search, without ncurses as a dependency, and in a mere 1,000 lines of code (at Github).

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Dear Valve and Steam Machines OEMs, you have it all wrong

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

Most of us reading this site want Steam Machines to do well. Not all of us will be interested in buying the hardware, but we're aware that its success is also tied to the success of Linux as a gaming platform, which is why I'm pretty miffed that the OEMs and Valve have messed it up.

Valve have done well with the controller and with making SteamOS pretty coherent and user-friendly, but messed it up when it came to defining what a Steam Machine actually is, leaving it open to interpretation. I've said this time and time again, but the original Steam Machines line-up was a complete mess. We had everything from $1500 PCs to ludicrously overpriced machines which didn't even have discreet graphics cards.

Even the best offerings fall short. Alienware's cheapest offering comes in at $450 (this should be the ideal price point in my opinion), but offers a mere 4GB RAM. If you want to scale this up to 8GB, you have to pay $750 since it also means upping the CPU to an i5. Does a GTX 960 need an i5 to do its thing? No, not really. You might get a few extra frames or do better in a more CPU-intensive game, but if one tries to step outside the worldview of a PC gamer and into one of a console gamer, then it doesn't take long to realise that those $200 aren't worth it, but $20 for an extra stick of 4GB RAM would be worth it.

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Manjaro Linux explained

Filed under
GNU
Linux

We hope you are enjoying your time on our site and we also want to make it better. Its been a long time for this so today we are bringing seventh segment of "Introduction with Linux Distro" series.

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Recycle and reuse your old computers

Filed under
GNU
Linux

As I am sure you have heard me mention before, Linux is free to download and install as there is no licence fee. There are also many different distributions available, some of which have been specifically designed to work on old or low powered hardware. With the added bonus that malware is virtually non-existent on Linux (it really is secure), it means you can turn your old PC that was gathering dust into a working machine that is also safer to use than before.

A lot of Linux distributions come with software preloaded, so you can be up and running in no time. Ubuntu for instance comes with LibreOffice and Thunderbird preloaded, which means all of your office and email needs are sorted without you having to worry about additional downloads, or forking out on some third party product.

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What If Linux Users Made Movies!

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Movies

I am just trying to imagine a few movies made by Linux lovers and for Linux loving audience. If such thing happens, what would be the movies look like? What would be their title?

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Tiny Core Linux 7.2 Released With New Features — A Blazing Fast 16MB Linux Distro

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The Core Project has recently announced the release of Tiny Core Linux 7.2. Tiny Core Linux is one of the smallest operating systems based on Linux kernel. TinyCore, the operating system’s popular version, is just 16MB in size and comes with a simple and fast GUI.

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GNU/FSF

Filed under
GNU

Not Your Mother’s Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

As someone who’s primarily used Windows since the early ’90s (with some minor dabbling in OS X), I’ve found Ubuntu MATE Linux to be pretty intuitive during my month or so of casual experimentation. I would even go so far as to say it’s been easier to figure out than recent iterations of Windows — which I hope says more about how clunky that old operating system has become and less about how woefully incompetent I might be with computers.

I have a confession to make — one that will come as no surprise to anyone who’s read this column in the past. I’m not really a computer person. My mother would disagree, but she’s never owned a computer — no matter how many times I’ve tried to get her on board for the admittedly selfish reason of being able to communicate with her in a fashion that avoids phone companies and post offices. She insists it’s because she “doesn’t like to type,” but I know her mistrust of technology goes far beyond computers (and if I got her a tablet, she’d be annoyed at the endless invasion of fingerprints — a complaint to which I can relate).

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Also: Full-screen Nagware: Microsoft’s Final Attempt To Push Windows 10 Is Its Worst Yet

Running Linux on the Acer Switch Alpha 12

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The Acer Switch Alpha 12 is a 2-in-1 tablet with a high-resolution display, a detachable keyboard cover, an optional pressure-sensitive pen, and after having reviewed the tablet, I can say it offers the kind of performance you’d expect from a mid-range laptop… but in a 2 pound, fanless package.

Best of all, the Switch Alpha 12 is reasonably priced: you can buy one for about $600 and up.

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Vista 10 (Windows 10) and Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • Windows 10 to Linux

    There is a lot of noise at the moment about Microsoft’s new operating system called Windows 10. Without repeating all the details you can have a look, say here or here or here. The essence of the story is that Microsoft is making it very difficult to avoid the new operating system. The advice being given is to not install the upgrade – which is anything but easy, since Windows 7 is supported until 2020.

  • A Windows zealot trashes Linux

    Linux has always been a fantastic alternative to Windows for many users. But there are some people who are so attached to Windows that the very idea of Linux offends them. So it was with one woman who became outraged when a Linux user tried to help her mother with some computer problems related to Windows 10.

  • The New Fullscreen Windows 10 Upgrade Nagging Reminder
  • Microsoft's final Windows 10 nagware gets up close and personal
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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

GNOME News

  • The future is here
    Nautilus from master, updated everyday, parallel installable, in less than 3 minutes. I cannot believe this is possible. Note that due to be sandboxed with no permission handling there are things that are not working, like opening with an application. For someone not aware of the whole platform and the Linux desktop, it’s difficult to see how many implications this bring to us and the changes that will allow in the upcoming months. This truly changes the game for GNOME (and any other desktop) as a project and platform, including 3rd party developers and companies using Linux desktops or that want to support it.
  • GUADEC’16 report
    I got a chance to attend GUADEC’16 which happened in Karlsruhe, Germany from 11 – 17 August. I stayed for the whole duration including Workshop Day, core days and the later BOF days which were very learning. I’m grateful to my mentor David Woodhouse who guided me all the time. I thank GNOME community for giving me the chance to speak at intern lightning talk and i tried my best to present my project in front of those great people. I hope to get a chance someday again to speak up. We have finished our GSoC project so i am free now to wander around to find some more places and tasks in GNOME’s huge shelter. My experience of attending GUADEC was awesome, despite being a less speaker i was very comfortable to talk and interact to people in the community. I made some new friends in the community and i came to know a lot more about it. I loved attending social events after the long day of great and motivating talks. I am thankful to the GUADEC organizers, i didn’t feel any problem for a second staying 6,000 kms away from home.
  • GUADEC 2016
    I came back from Karlsruhe last week, where GUADEC 2016 took place. It was a wonderful event. Even though it was only my second GUADEC, I felt at home in this community, meeting with old and new friends.
  • Summer Talks, PurpleEgg
    The topics were different but related: The Flock talk talked about how to make things better for a developer using Fedora Workstation as their development workstation, while the GUADEC talk was about the work we are doing to move Fedora to a model where the OS is immutable and separate from applications. A shared idea of the two talks is that your workstation is not your development environment environment. Installing development tools, language runtimes, and header files as part of your base operating system implies that every project you are developing wants the same development environment, and that simply is not the case.

Fedora News

  • UDP Failures and RNGs
  • F24-20160823 updated Live isos
    New Kernel means new set of updated lives. I am happy to release the F24-20160823 updated lives isos.
  • Curse you, Jon Masters! Why do you always have to be right!
    Long story short, Fedora 24 came out and I'm given the taste of the same medicine: the video on the ASUS is completely busted. I was able to limp along for now by using the old kernel 4.4.6-301.fc23, but come on, this is clearly a massive regression. Think anyone is there to bisect and find the culprit? Of course not. I have to do it it myself. So, how did F24 ship? Well... I didn't test beta versions, so I don't have much ground to complain.
  • Communication Anti-Patterns
  • Autocloud: What's new?
    Autocloud was released during the Fedora 23 cycle as a part of the Two Week Atomic Process. Previously, it used to listen to fedmsg for successful Koji builds. Whenever, there is a new message the AutocloudConsumer queues these message for processing. The Autocloud job service then listens to the queue, downloads the images and runs the tests using Tunir. A more detailed post about it’s release can be read here. During the Fedora 24 cycle things changed. There was a change on how the Fedora composes are built. Thanks to adamw for writing a detailed blogpost on what, why and how things changed.