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Linux Laptop: Buying New vs. Used Laptop

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

There are few things in a Linux enthusiast's life more fun than buying a new Linux laptop. One could even argue that the mere act of "spec'ing out" a new unit is more exciting than the actual use of the laptop itself.

In this article, I'm going to walk you through the decision making progress of buying a new Linux laptop vs. procuring a good second hand one instead. I'll share the advantages and disadvantages to each option.

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Also: The PC business: Decline continues in Q2

KDE's Plasma 5.10.4 in Chakra GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux

4MLinux 23.0 BETA released.

Filed under
GNU
Linux

4MLinux 23.0 BETA is ready for testing. Basically, at this stage of development, 4MLinux BETA has the same features as 4MLinux STABLE, but it provides a huge number of updated packages, including a major change in the core of the system, which now uses the GNU C Library 2.25.

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Also: 4MLinux 23 Slated for Release in November 2017, to Be Supported Until July 2018

BackBox Linux 5

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Ubuntu-Based BackBox Linux 5 Ethical Hacking Distro Debuts with Linux Kernel 4.8

    The development team behind the Ubuntu-based BackBox Linux ethical hacking distribution designed for security evaluations and penetration testing tasks announced the release of BackBox Linux 5.

    BackBox Linux 5 has been in development for too long, since even the release of BackBox Linux 4.7 in early December last year, but it's finally here, and it brings with it a significant number of improvements, up-to-date components, as well as several under-the-hood optimizations and tweaks.

    "The BackBox Team proudly announces the major release of BackBox v5. It took long due to several development processes, but we worked hard and got through it," said the devs in the release announcement. "In this major release we made some structural changes, we removed outdated tools and added new ones."

  • BackBox Linux 5 released!

    The BackBox Team proudly announces the major release of BackBox v5. It took long due to several development processes, but we worked hard and got through it.

    In this major release we made some structural changes, we removed outdated tools and added new ones.

System76 to Collaborate with elementary OS Devs on the New Installer for Pop!_OS

Filed under
GNU
Linux

A week ago, we reported on the progress System76 has made for their upcoming Ubuntu-based Pop!_OS GNU/Linux distribution, as well as some of the things that they're planning to implement soon.

Pop!_OS is developed on top of Canonical's Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system, due for release on October 19, 2017, which means that it's of Alpha quality, so some things might not work as expected or are missing, including the installer, which System76 now wants to develop in collaboration with the elementary OS devs.

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A look at the nano text editor in GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Given that I have been writing the odd article here and there about server work, hosting, VPS and the like, I thought that perhaps an article about editing configuration files / text documents in a command line scenario might be a good idea.

There are a few major text editors out there, some more user-friendly while some are more complex but bring extra power and configuration (I'm looking at you Vim.)

The editor that most users who are new to the world of working with text only will likely start with, is called Nano.

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Leftovers: Ask the Linux Foundation and Review of Damn Small Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Reviews
  • Questions about SysAdmin Training from The Linux Foundation? Join the Next #AskLF

    His #AskLF chat will take place the Monday after SysAdmin Day: a professional holiday the organization has recognized for years.

  • Damn Small Linux A Lightweight Linux Distro For Old Computers

    By the name yes it’s really small and lightweight (had to utter this word too “damn!”). Damn Small Linux is a distro that offers a GUI based OS for low resource systems and some applications for normal users task-alike. It’s designed with the intention to pack all the modern features under 50 MB.
    ​Well, that may sound crazy but you cannot rely on it as a primary OS if you have a recent modern hardware. Instead take a U-turn now and see what Ubuntu, Fedora or OpenSUSE has to offer.

    Damn Small Linux latest version is v4.11rc2 and development has been in a long pause since 2015. Don’t be put off by that because that’s how some people roll. Slow and steady until they sort things out.

BSD and Programming: OpenBSD, Development Style, and GCC/C++

Filed under
Development
GNU
BSD
  • OpenBSD kernel address randomized link

    A less than two-month-old project for OpenBSD, kernel address space randomized link (KARL), has turned the kernel into an object that is randomized on every boot. Instead of the code being stored in the same location for every boot of a given kernel, each boot will be unique. Unlike Linux's kernel address space layout randomization (KASLR), which randomizes the base address for all of the kernel code on each boot, KARL individually randomizes the object files that get linked into the binary. That means that a single information leak of a function address from the kernel does not leak information about the location of all other functions.

    Theo de Raadt first posted about the idea on the OpenBSD tech mailing list on May 30. He described the current layout of the OpenBSD kernel code, which is effectively the boot code and assembly runtime (in locore.o), followed by the kernel .o files in a fixed order. His post had some changes that would split out the assembly runtime from locore.o and link it and all of the kernel .o files in a random order. The only piece that would be placed at a known address would be locore.o; it would be followed by a randomly sized gap, then by the kernel text that has its .o files arranged in a random order. There would also be random gaps before other sections (i.e. .rodata, .data, and .bss) that are placed after the kernel text.

  • openbsd changes of note 625
  • moving to https

     

    There is some security benefit, of course, but really it’s all about the speed. I want flak to be as fast as possible, thus we need to be using the fastest protocol.  

  • Stop writing code like we're in the '90s: a practical approach (PART Sleepy

    A lot of criticisms come from users that probably wrote Java code when it was born.

  • GCC Begins Preparing For C++20 With -std=c++2a

Netrunner Rolling and Ubuntu Upgrades

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu
  • Netrunner Rolling Is Back After One and a Half Years, It's Based on Arch Linux

    After one and a half years of silence, the Netrunner Rolling series make a comeback today with the release of version 2017.07, based on Arch Linux and Manjaro operating systems.

    By our count, Netrunner Rolling 2017.07 is here sixteen months after the Netrunner Rolling 2016.01 release, which was unveiled on February 27, 2016, and it's an up-to-date version with all the latest GNU/Linux technologies. The good news is that it's here to stay, and will receive regular updates 3 or 4 for times a year.

  • Clarification and changes to release upgrades

    I’ve recently made some changes to how do-release-upgrade, called by update-manager when you choose to upgrade releases, behaves and thought it’d be a good time to clarify how things work and the changes made.

    When do-release-upgrade is called it reads a meta-release file from changelogs.ubuntu.com to determine what releases are supported and to which release to upgrade. The exact meta-release file changes depending on what arguments, –proposed or –devel-release, are passed to do-release-upgrade. The meta-release file is used to determine which tarball to download and use to actually perform the upgrade. So if you are upgrading from Ubuntu 17.04 to Artful then you are actually using the the ubuntu-release-upgrader code from Artful.

AN INTRODUCTION TO LINUX Mint 18.2

Filed under
GNU
Linux

While the rest of the Linux World is wrangling over fast changing paradigms and the plethora of new Linux Distributions that are popping up everywhere, Linux Mint just keeps on plodding along. They keep change to a minimum and endeavor to maintain a consistent user experience while still improving it. The latest version, Linux Mint 18.2 “Sonya” was officially released just days before this writing and it’s very good, indeed. The best Linux Mint yet.

I didn’t choose to support Linux Mint exclusively through the EzeeLinux Project. It chooses me. So many folks have asked for help getting started with Linux Mint over the last couple of years that I finally decided to focus on it and promote it for new users. It has proven itself to be a great place for newcomers to Linux to start and it also offers the kind of stability that people who want to use a computer to get stuff done. I keep close tabs on the Mint project’s progress and I downloaded and installed the ISO for 18.2 as soon it as it was announced. I was blown away by how polished it was in this very early form and the final release is rock solid. I have already upgraded most of my personal machines and I also have helped many EzeeLinux community members to upgrade… No one has reported any major issues thus far.

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More in Tux Machines

XFree KWin, Plasma, KDE, and Qt/GTK

  • Announcing the XFree KWin project
    Over the last weeks I concentrated my work on KWin on what I call the XFree KWin project. The idea is to be able to start KWin/Wayland without XWayland support. While most of the changes required for it are already in Plasma 5.11, not everything got ready in time, but now everything is under review on phabricator, so it’s a good point in time to talk about this project.
  • Adapta Theme is Now Available for the #KDE Plasma Desktop
    A new port brings the Adapta GTK theme to the KDE Plasma 5 desktop for the first time, news that will please fans of its famous flat stylings.
  • A New Project To Let You Run Qt Apps With GTK+ Windowing System Integration
    A Norwegian developer has developed a new Qt platform abstraction plug-in to let Qt applications make use of GTK+ for windowing system integration. The Qt apps rely upon GTK+ as a host toolkit to provide GTK menus, GTK for input, and other integration bits.
  • Ant is a Flat GTK Theme with a Bloody Bite
    Between Arc, Adapta and Numix it kind of feels like Linux has the whole flat GTK theme thing covered. But proving their’s always room for one more is Ant.

Android Leftovers

Development: Blockchain for Good Hackathon, ASUS Tinker Board, React License, JavaScript, Pascal, Python

  • Blockchain for Good Hackathon, Saturday, 30 September and Sunday, 1 October
    The Blockchain for Good Hackathon takes place Saturday, 30 September and Sunday, 1 October. Full agenda can be found here.
  • ASUS Tinker Board Is An Interesting ARM SBC For About $60 USD
    Earlier this year ASUS announced the Tinker Board as their first step into the ARM single board computer world. Earlier this month I finally received a Tinker Board for testing and it has been quite interesting to say the least. The Tinker Board with its Rockchip SoC has been among the most competitive ARM SBCs we have tested to date in its price range and the form factor is compatible with the Raspberry Pi.
  • Configure Thunderbird to send patch friendly
  • Facebook to Relicense React Under MIT [Ed: as we hoped [1, 2]]
    Facebook has decided to change the React license from BSD+Patents to MIT to make it possible for companies to include React in Apache projects, and to avoid uncertain relationship with the open source community. Adam Wolff, an Engineering Director at Facebook, has announced that a number of projects - React, Jest, Flow, and Immutable.js – will soon start using the more standard MIT License instead of BSD+Patents. The reason provided is "because React is the foundation of a broad ecosystem of open source software for the web, and we don't want to hold back forward progress for nontechnical reasons." While aware that the React’s BSD+Patents license has created "uncertainty" among users of the library, prompting some to select an alternative solution, Facebook does not "expect to win these teams back" but they still hope some will reconsider the issue. The change in license will become effective when React 16 will be released next week. Regarding other projects, Wolff said that "many of our popular projects will keep the BSD + Patents license for now", while they are "evaluating those projects' licenses too, but each project is different and alternative licensing options will depend on a variety of factors." It seems from this clause that Facebook plans to get rid of the BSD+Patents license entirely, but they need to figure out the best option for each project. [...] Facebook’s plan to switch to a standard license MIT, supported by Apache, completely solves this problem with React and several other projects. It remains to see what happens with the license of other Facebook projects, and how much this license issue has affected how React is perceived by the community.
  • To type or not to type: quantifying detectable bugs in JavaScript
  • Plug For PASCAL
  • V. Anton Spraul's Think Like a Programmer, Python Edition

New Manjaro Release

What a week we had. With this update we have removed most of our EOL tagged kernels. Please adopt to newer series of each, when still be used. PulseAudio and Gstreamer got renewed. Also most of our kernels got newer point-releases. Series v4.12 is now marked as EOL. Guillaume worked on Pamac to solve reported issues within our v6 series. The user experience should be much better now. Latest NetworkManager, Python and Haskell updates complete this update-pack. Please report back and give us feedback for given changes made to our repositories. Read more