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GNU

Fear of GPL Compliance

Filed under
GNU
  • macOS Catalina Switches Default Shell From Bash to Zsh. But Why? [Ed: Why? Patents. Apple is an evil company which wants software patents for leverage and the GPL stands in its way.]
  • Bethesda's legal department drops the hammer on Doom Remake 4 mod

    "Unfortunately I had to remove all downloads due to legal issues not being sorted," vasyan777 wrote in the most recent update. "I thought ZeniMax would approve the new build because this time it was distributed as a mod, but it seems the problem was a 'third-party game engine' which they said is illegal to use with Doom IP (this is very weird since Doom Remake 4 was bundled with GZDoom which is just a Doom source port forked from original Doom engine which is GPL)."

Audiocasts/Shows: BSD Now (DragonFlyBSD/OpenBSD/NetBSD), The Linux Link Tech Show, and FLOSS Weekly

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD
  • Contention Reduction | BSD Now 302

    DragonFlyBSD’s kernel optimizations pay off, differences between OpenBSD and Linux, NetBSD 2019 Google Summer of Code project list, Reducing that contention, fnaify 1.3 released, vmctl(8): CLI syntax changes, and things that Linux distributions should not do when packaging.

  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 813
  • FLOSS Weekly 533: faastRuby

    faastRuby allows you to build serverless applications using functions to deploy to any cloud and scale without cold starts. You can use both Ruby and Crystal in the same appl and schedule periodic runs in plain English and Cron syntax. It allows for real-time cloud syn from your favorite code editor as well.

GIMP 2.10.12 Released

Filed under
GNU

Though it gets less visibility, work on upcoming GIMP 3 continues and is going well. We will give more news soon enough.

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Also: GIMP 2.10.12 Released With Some Useful Improvements

CERN Is Working To Move Further Away From Microsoft Due To License Costs Going Up By 10x

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server
Microsoft

CERN, The European Organization for Nuclear Research that is home to the Large Hadron Collider and a lot of other experiments, is experimenting with moving further away from Microsoft products. Due to Microsoft license fee increases affecting their work in the research laboratory and its budget, they established the Microsoft Alternatives "MAlt" project.

CERN had already long been involved with developing Scientific Linux (now shifting to CentOS) but they have still been reliant upon Microsoft products in other areas, on some Windows systems as well as using the likes of Skype for Business.

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Also today: Ubuntu preinstalled by Lenovo.

Linux Desktop Spotlight: Meet The Distro With An Awesome Xfce Experience Right Out Of the Box

Filed under
GNU
Linux

So what makes it special, aside from the feeling you get when you see these screenshots or watch the distro in action? It's the fact that Enso OS incorporates Plank, elementary's Gala window manager and the Panther launcher -- itself a fork of elementary's Slingshot launcher and catered toward Xfce use.

The Enso OS team also forked elementary's stylish AppCenter, which they call Apphive. I did notice it's quite slow to load initially, but I can let that slide for now since this is an early beta release. On the plus side, Apphive does feature native Snap support.

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Endless OS 3.6.0 Released To Deliver A User-friendly Linux Experience

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Endless Computers, which made waves a couple of years ago with the launch of Endless Mini, is also known for its Debian derivative Endless OS distribution. Featuring a highly-customized GNOME desktop, Endless OS makes use of lots of open source technologies to create a user-friendly operating system.

Endless OS is also known to let you download a “full” ISO image that comes loaded with more than 100 apps, making it useful without the need for connecting your computer to the web. The latest Endless OS 3.6.0 release further improves the experience by updating the packages to the latest version and adding new features. The updated packages are the latest versions from the Debian ‘Buster,’ which is the upcoming stable release.

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Release Notes for CRUX 3.5

Filed under
GNU
Linux

This page discusses the relevant changes introduced in CRUX 3.5. Everybody upgrading from the previous release is advised to carefully read the following notes.

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Corresponding announcement:

  • CRUX

    CRUX 3.5 has been released! Please check out the Release Notes, the ChangeLog and the Handbook, and download CRUX 3.5 right here.

BackBox Linux 6 released!

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The BackBox Team is happy to announce the new major release of BackBox Linux, the version 6.

As usual, this major release includes many updates. These include new kernel, updated tools and some structural changes with a focus on maintaining stability and compatibility with Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.

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GPL Dodge and Compliance

Filed under
GNU
Legal
  • Why does macOS Catalina use Zsh instead of Bash? Licensing [iophk: "s/patents/software patents/g; :("]

    So, it’s no surprise that Apple’s moving its users away from Bash. I’m also not surprised to see Apple favor Zsh. For starters, it’s licensed under the MIT License, and therefore doesn’t contain the controversial language surrounding patents and Tivoization.

  • The Redmi S2, aka Y2, gets its Android Pie update

    That may not be a huge deal to some users, however. Xiaomi is also obliged to release the S2/Y2's kernel sources in order to remain compliant with GNU's general public licence.

I Finally Have a Dedicated Linux Laptop Again (But You Won’t Be Jealous)

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Prior to now I’d been making do with a co-opted Acer Chromebook R11 as my go-to Linux portable. While that machine is perfect for travelling (and boasts a great screen) let’s just say the modern Ubuntu desktop isn’t a comfortable fit with just 2GB RAM!

And prior to that it was a succession of low-power, low-end netbooks — that’s how long it’s been!

Now, not being rich (a recurring theme) my budget for a new Linux laptop was a modest £400 max. That put the sort of Linux laptops I regularly write about — Slimbook, Entroware, StationX, Dell, et al — out of my reach.

Sob.

But thankfully all the major laptop makers offer a range of mid-level Windows 10 notebooks that were in my grasp.

Budget aside, my main requirements were thus: it had to be new; 12-14-inch screen; a minimum of 8GB RAM; and a processor that, ideally, wasn’t a Celeron.

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Also: Bug Report Update: Linux Apps Working In Dev Channel Again

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