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GNU

Comparing Search between Nautilus and Nemo File Managers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
GNOME

Personally, I like Nemo search better than Nautilus search as I need to sort everything I find and I cannot do that with Nautilus. I love sort by Date/Descending as I use it everyday.

Apparently, not only me saying this. I don't know why this once-existed feature removed in current versions of Nautilus, as normal interface provides sorting but search interface does not. I will not wonder if somebody ask "why not removing sort in the normal interface as well?" or such.

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Linux distros without systemd

Filed under
GNU
Linux

If you are reading this post you're very much likely not a fan of systemd already. So we won't preach on why systemd is bad, but today we'll focus more on what are the alternatives out there. Our approach is obviously not for settling for less but for changing things for the better. We have started the world after systemd project some time ago and the search isn't over.

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Discussion: Linux Distros Without Systemd (2019)

Xfce 4.14 Coming Soon

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Xfce 4.14pre1 released!

    Note: A lot has happened since Xfce 4.12 was released four years ago and this announcement only covers the changes that were included in the latest development releases dubbed as Xfce 4.14pre1. Also, we have noticed some confusion by people or news outlets that seem to mistake xfdesktop for the “Xfce Desktop Environment”.

    The comprehensive changelog will be provided with the Xfce 4.14 final release, but here go some select highlights that were released in the last week (chosen subjectively by the author).

  • Xfce 4.14 Sees Its Long-Awaited Pre-Release

    The GTK3-ported Xfce 4.14 might see its long-awaited official release in the near future. In preparing for a hopeful August debut, the Xfce 4.14 pre-release is now available.

    It's been four years since the release of Xfce 4.12 and in addition to the GTK3 tool-kit re-tooling there has been a lot of UI improvements, vblank support added, colord integration, and many other feature additions.

GNU Guix 1.0.1 released

Filed under
GNU

We are pleased to announce the release of GNU Guix version 1.0.1. This new version fixes bugs in the graphical installer for the standalone Guix System.

The release comes with ISO-9660 installation images, a virtual machine image, and with tarballs to install the package manager on top of your GNU/Linux distro, either from source or from binaries. Guix users can update by running guix pull.

It’s been just over two weeks since we announced 1.0.0—two weeks and 706 commits by 40 people already!

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Bison 3.4 released

Filed under
GNU

We are happy to announce the release of Bison 3.4.
A particular focus was put on improving the diagnostics, which are now
colored by default, and accurate with multibyte input. Their format was
also changed, and is now similar to GCC 9's diagnostics.
Users of the default backend (yacc.c) can use the new %define variable
api.header.include to avoid duplicating the content of the generated header
in the generated parser. There are two new examples installed, including a
reentrant calculator which supports recursive calls to the parser and
Flex-generated scanner.

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GNU/Linux Rising (Latest News)

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • The Envelope Please.......

    Those who have followed Reglue.org over the years know that we place a strong emphasis on STEM topics and education. "STEM" is the given acronym for science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Linux is superbly well-tooled for these purposes and every computer we place with a financially disadvantaged student is Linux-powered. Now, that might sound like a steroid-fueled buzzkill to most, but in researching the online STEM subject matter, we found that we could actually make it fun. Yeah. Science....go figure.

    [...]

    Just so you know the dynamics involved in presenting these topics to the Reglue kid, we enabled the bookmark bar under the URL bar in Chromium or Firefox. We offer both browsers and allow the student to choose the default. Within that bookmark bar, we place the links to the subject matter we choose for that student, depending on age and aptitude. Our pool of choices is vast, so narrowing it down took a good bit of time, years actually. With feedback from 388 students, we were able to draw down the most popular websites and personalities within the STEM subject matter we wished to provide.

  • Govt Schools In Kerala To Use Linux-Based Free OS, Saving Rs 3000 Cr

    Kerala, the first 100% literate Indian state is not only known for its beautiful backwaters but also for its education policy which benefits everyone and not just one sector. And now, undertaking one of the most progressive educational reforms, this South-Indian state has declared to welcome open source in a huge way.

    As per a report by The Hindu, more than 2 lakh computers in schools across the state will soon be powered by the latest version of the Linux-based free Operating System called as [...] that provides a variety of applications for educational and general purposes. The state-owned Kerala Infrastructure and Technology for Education (KITE) has rolled out this new version which is based on the Ubuntu OS LTS edition and includes numerous free applications customised as per the state school curriculum such as DTP (Desktop Publishing) graphics, 3D animation packages, language input tools, video editing, Geographical Information System, image editing software, sound recording, database applications, open source office suite, and various others.

  • Google Extinguishes 'Campfire' Dual-Booting Windows 10 on Chromebooks

    Evidence from last year showed that Google was working on dual-booting Chrome OS alongside “AltOS,” a codename believed to be referring to Windows 10.

  • South Korea Thinks Of Switching From Windows To Linux Platform

    The government has opted for Linux instead of Windows 10 to save a significant amount of money Windows is a paid OS whereas Linux is a free, open-source operating system. It would cost around 780 billion won or 655 million dollars for switching to Linus platform and buying new PCs.

    Another reason for this change is that the Linux platform has lesser security risks compared to Windows. This is the main factor that most of the enterprise networks around the world uses Linux based OS to run their machines.

  • South Korea Government prefer Linux to Windows 10 [Ed: Microsoft boosters have begun smearing or belittling Korea's plan to move to GNU/Linux]

    A report from the Korean Herald  stated, “Before the government-wide adoption, the ministry said it would test if the system could be run on private networked devices without security risks and if compatibility could be achieved with existing websites and software which have been built to run on Windows.”

    It is not exactly clear which Linux distribution the South Korean Government are eyeing.

  • Government Planning to Replace Windows 7 with Linux, Not Windows 10 [Ed: Longtime Microsoft propagandists such as  Bogdan Popa will have a dilemma; maintain the lie/perception "Microsoft loves Linux" or viciously attack Linux (which Microsoft bribes governments to reject or, failing that, dump)?]

    While specifics on what Linux distro they want to embrace are not available, it looks like the first step towards this migration to the open-source world is a security audit that should help the government determine if their data is protected or not.

  • Meditations on First ThinkPad: How Lenovo adapts to changes in the PC industry

    Linux and ThinkPads go together, but not at the factory

    ThinkPads are often the laptop of choice for Linux users, as Lenovo does certify some ThinkPad models for Linux use. Unfortunately, buyers are typically subject to the Windows Tax, resulting in purchased, though unused, licenses.

    The question of getting Linux installed from the factory "comes up over and over with some of our very important customers, and it is taken very seriously," Paradise noted, adding that Lenovo "provides drivers and a BIOS that is compatible," reiterating that "we get that request a lot."

  • Red Hat CTO: Scalability, usability key RHEL 8 components

    As data center infrastructure grows beyond on-premises facilities, admins and developers need ways to effectively manage hardware through software. With Linux as the standard for many data centers, organizations must find new techniques to use the OS beyond server deployments.

S. Korean government to switch to Linux: ministry

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The government will switch the operating system of its computers from Windows to Linux, the Ministry of the Interior and Safety said Thursday.

The Interior Ministry said the ministry will be test-running Linux on its PCs, and if no security issues arise, Linux systems will be introduced more widely within the government.

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GNU, FSF and FSFE Leftovers

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Respect Your Freedom and ThinkPenguin, Privacy Protection in Purism’s Librem One Suite

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Six more devices from ThinkPenguin, Inc. now FSF-certified to Respect Your Freedom

    This is ThinkPenguin's second batch of devices to receive RYF certification this spring. The FSF announced certification of seven other devices from ThinkPenguin on March 21st. This latest collection of devices makes ThinkPenguin the retailer with the largest catalog of RYF-certified devices.

    "It's unfortunate that so many of even the simplest devices out there have surprise proprietary software requirements. RYF is an antidote for that. It connects ethical shoppers concerned about their freedom with companies offering options respecting that freedom," said the FSF's executive director, John Sullivan.

    Today's certifications expands the availability of RYF-certified peripheral devices. The Penguin USB 2.0 External USB Stereo Sound Adapter and the 5.1 Channels 24-bit 96KHz PCI Express Audio Sound Card help users get the most of their computers in terms of sound quality. For wireless connectivity, ThinkPenguin offers the Wireless N PCI Express Dual-Band Mini Half-Height Card and Penguin Wireless N Mini PCIe Card. For users with an older printer, the USB to Parallel Printer Cable can let them continue to use it with their more current hardware. Finally, the PCIe eSATA / SATA 6Gbps Controller Card help users to connect to external eSATA devices as well as internal SATA.

  • Purism’s Librem One Suite of Privacy Protecting, No-track Apps and Services Surges Past Initial Crowdfunding Goal After Two Weeks

    Purism, the social purpose corporation which designs and produces popular secure hardware, software, and services, has seen its Librem One suite of privacy protecting apps and services surpass its initial crowdfunding goal of 5,000 backers in just two weeks.

    Librem One is growing in popularity as users grow distrustful of how large tech companies are using their personal information.

  • 5000 Happy Librem One Users!

hgTerm Is A DIY Mini Raspberry Pi Computer That Runs PlayStation Games

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Raspberry Pi has been used in a number of mini laptops that run on tiny single-board computers. But a recent one, developed by hgTerm, could be one of the best DIY mini PCs made till date.

The pocket-sized hgTerm computer comes with a 4-inch touchscreen display and rocks a 270-degree hinge that can be flipped backwards to use the device as a stand.

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More in Tux Machines

Graphics: Red Hat's Wayland Agenda and AMD Begins Queueing Graphics Driver Changes For The Linux 5.3 Kernel

  • Hans de Goede: Wayland itches summary
    1. Middle click on title / header bar to lower the Window does not work for native apps. Multiple people have reported this issue to me. A similar issue was fixed for not being able to raise Windows. It should be easy to apply a similar fix for the lowering problem. There are bugs open for this here, here and here. 2. Running graphical apps via sudo or pxexec does not work. There are numerous examples of apps breaking because of this, such as lshw-gui and usbivew. At least for X11 apps this is not that hard to fix. But sofar this has deliberately not been fixed. The reasoning behind this is described in this bug. I agree with the reasoning behind this, but I think it is not pragmatic to immediately disallow all GUI apps to connect when run as root starting today.
  • Hans de Goede: Better support for running games under Wayland (with GNOME3/mutter as compositor)
    First of all I do not want people to get their hopes up about $subject of this blogpost. Improving gaming support is a subjects which holds my personal interest and it is an issue I plan to spend time on trying to improve. But this will take a lot of time (think months for simple things, years for more complex things).
  • AMD Begins Queueing Graphics Driver Changes For The Linux 5.3 Kernel
    Being past the Linux 5.2 kernel merge window, AMD's open-source Linux graphics driver developers have already begun queuing changes anticipated for Linux 5.3 via a work-in-progress tree. Given the short time that this 5.3 WIP tree has been around, there isn't too much exciting about the changes -- yet. But surely over the weeks ahead it will get interesting. Making things particularly interesting is that we are expecting initial Navi support to make it for Linux 5.3... In recent weeks AMD began pushing AMDGPU LLVM compiler back-end changes for GFX10/Navi and we expect the AMDGPU DRM kernel driver enablement to come for Linux 5.3. Linux 5.3 will already be arriving after the rumored release of the first Navi graphics cards so having to wait past 5.3 for mainline support would already be tragic. But given the recent LLVM activity, we expect AMD to push out the Navi kernel driver changes soon. For that likely massive patch-set to be reviewed in time, the Navi patches would need to make their debut within the next few weeks.

today's howtos and programming

Fedora 30 Workstation review - Smarter, faster and buggier

Fedora 30 is definitely one of the more interesting releases of this family in a long-time. It brings significant changes, including solid improvements in the desktop performance and responsiveness. Over the years, Fedora went from no proprietary stuff whatsoever to slowly acknowledging the modern needs of computing, so now it gives you MP3 codecs and you can install graphics drivers and such. Reasonable looks, plus good functionality across the board. However, there were tons of issues, too. Printing to Samba, video screenshot bug, installer cropped-image slides, package management complications, mouse cursor lag, oopses, average battery life, and inadequate usability out of the box. You need to change the defaults to have a desktop that can be used in a quick, efficient way without remembering a dozen nerdy keyboard shortcuts. All in all, I like the freshness. In general, it would seem the Linux desktop is seeing a cautious revival, and Fedora's definitely a happy player. But there are too many rough edges. Well, we got performance tweaks after so many years, and codecs, we might get window buttons and desktop icons one day back, too. Something like 6/10, and definitely worth exploring. I am happy enough to do two more tests. I will run an in-vivo upgrade on the F29 instance on this same box, and then also test the distro on an old Nvidia-powered laptop, which will showcase both the support for proprietary graphics (didn't work the last time) and performance improvements, if they scale for old hardware, too. That's all for now. Read more

Events: Automotive at LF, Linux Clusters Institute, Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC)

  • Automotive Linux Summit and Open Source Summit Japan Keynote Speakers and Schedule Announced
    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source has announced the speaker line up for Open Source Summit Japan and Automotive Linux Summit. One registration provides access to all content at both events, which will be held July 17-19 at the Toranomon Hills Forum in Tokyo. Open Source Summit Japan (OSSJ) and Automotive Linux Summit (ALS) will bring together top talent from companies on the leading edge of innovation including Toyota Motor Corporation, Uber, Intel, Sony, Google, Microsoft and more. Talks will cover a range of topics, with ALS talks on everything from infrastructure and hardware to compliance and security; and OSSJ sessions on AI, Linux systems, cloud infrastructure, cloud native applications, open networking, edge computing, safety and security and open source best practices.
  • Register Now for the 2019 Introductory Linux Clusters Institute Workshop
    Registration is now open for the 2019 Linux Clusters Institute (LCI) Introductory Workshop,which will be held August 19-23, 2019 at the Rutgers University Inn & Conference Center in New Brunswick, NJ. This workshop will cover the fundamentals of setting up and administering a high-performance computing (HPC) cluster and will be led by leading HPC experts.
  • Additional early bird slots available for LPC 2019
    The Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC) registration web site has been showing “sold out” recently because the cap on early bird registrations was reached. We are happy to report that we have reviewed the registration numbers for this year’s conference and were able to open more early bird registration slots. Beyond that, regular registration will open July 1st. Please note that speakers and microconference runners get free passes to LPC, as do some microconference presenters, so that may be another way to attend the conference. Time is running out for new refereed-track and microconference proposals, so visit the CFP page soon. Topics for accepted microconferences are welcome as well.