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Pinebooks

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GNU
Linux
  • $89 Linux laptop? Check out the new Pinebook from Raspberry Pi rival Pine

    The makers of a popular Raspberry Pi challenger, the $20 Pine A64, have returned with two sub-$100 Linux laptops, called Pinebooks.

    The Pine A64 stood out among developer boards because it was cheap and relatively powerful, helping its maker raise $1.7m on Kickstarter last year with just a $30,000 target.

  • Meet PineBook, a $89 ARM Based Open Source Notebook

    We do have plenty of low-cost laptops in the market, most of them come powered by Windows and can be had in the sub $200 price range. On the other hand, we also have the premium range of laptops that cost above $1000. PineBook is an ultra affordable 64-bit ARM-based Open Source Laptop that comes with a tempting price point of $89 for the 11-inch variant and $99 for the 14-inch variant. The notebook is powered by the Quad-Core Allwinner ARM Cortex A53 64-Bit processor which is also used in the PINE A64 Single Board Computer.

2016 Linux predictions, LinuxQuestions.org Turns 16

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GNU
Linux
  • 2016 Linux predictions: Which ones came true?

    Roughly one year ago, I made a series of predictions about what would happen in the Linux world during 2016. Let’s take a look at just how wrong I was.

  • LinuxQuestions.org celebrates sweet 16

    I purchased The Linux Bible from a local bookstore, so my first distribution was Yggdrasil. Although the last official release of Yggdrasil was in 1995, it was a popular option early on and ended up being the first Linux distribution available as a live CD. I've used Linux as my main operating system ever since. I like to tinker and understand how things work, so the fact that I could get an operating system that allowed me not only to see how things worked, but also to modify how things worked, enthralled me.

Linux on Servers

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GNU
Linux
Server
  • Docker 1.13.0 RC2 Supports Building of Docker DEBs for Ubuntu 16.10 on PPC64LE

    Two weeks ago, we discussed here the upcoming features of the Docker 1.13.0 open-source and cross-platform application container engine as part of the new version's first Release Candidate build.

    And now, Developer Victor Vieux announced the availability of the second RC version for the Docker 1.13.0 release, which appears to bring lots of improvements and bug fixes. Notable changes include support for labels on volumes, the ability to filter volumes by label, along with the ability to purge data from a deleted volume using the "--force" parameter in the "docker volume rm" command.

  • AWS Launches Amazon Linux Container Image

    AWS recently launched a Docker container image for its Amazon Linux operating system, complementing the EC2 specific Amazon Linux AMI with a versatile deployment option for custom cloud and on-premise environments. The image is available through the Amazon EC2 Container Registry (Amazon ECR), and also as an official repository on Docker Hub.

    The Amazon Linux AMI is a "supported and maintained Linux image provided by Amazon Web Services" that is designed to "provide a stable, secure, and high performance execution environment for applications running on Amazon EC2". It has long been the base image for most of AWS' Linux based offerings, such as the AWS Elastic Beanstalk platforms, the Amazon Elastic MapReduce releases, and the Amazon EC2 Container Service instances.

  • 3 Emerging Cloud Technologies You Should Know

    In previous articles, we’ve discussed four notable trends in cloud computing and how the rise of microservices and the public cloud has led to a whole new class of open source cloud computing projects. These projects leverage the elasticity of the public cloud and enable applications designed and built to run on it.

    Early on in cloud computing, there was a migration of existing applications to Amazon Web Services, Google, and Microsoft’s Azure. Virtually any app that ran on hardware in private data centers could be virtualized and deployed to the cloud. Now with a mature cloud market, more applications are being written and deployed directly to the cloud and are often referred to as being cloud native.

    Here we’ll explore three emerging cloud technologies and mention a few key projects in each area. For a more in-depth explanation and to see a full list of all the projects across six broad categories, download our free 2016 Guide to the Open Cloud report.

  • Why the fuss about serverless?

    To explain this, I’m going to have to recap on some old work with a particular focus on co-evolution.

Open source has won, and Microsoft has surrendered

Filed under
GNU
Linux
OSS

I have covered Microsoft’s interference with FOSS [free and open-source software] for over a decade and carefully studied even pertinent antitrust documents. I know the company’s way of thinking when it comes to undermining their competition

The pattern of embrace and extend (to extinguish) — all this while leveraging software patents to make Linux a Microsoft cash cow or compel OEMs to preinstall privacy-hostile Microsoft software/apps with proprietary formats (lockin) — never ended. What I see in the Linux Foundation right now is what I saw in Nokia 5 years ago and in Novell 10 years ago — the very thing that motivated me to start BoycottNovell, a site that has just turned 10 with nearly 22,000 blog posts. It is a saddening day because it’s a culmination, after years of Microsoft ‘micro’ payments to the Linux Foundation (e.g. event sponsorship in exchange for keynote positions), which will have Microsoft shoved down the throats of GNU/Linux proponents and give an illusion of peace when there is none, not just on the patent front but also other fronts (see what Microsoft’s partner Accenture is doing in Munich right now).

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Parsix GNU/Linux 8.15 (Nev) and 8.10 (Erik) Get New Security Updates from Debian

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GNU
Linux
Debian

Today, November 27, 2016, the developers of the Debian-based Parsix GNU/Linux distribution announced the availability of new security updates for the Parsix GNU/Linux 8.10 "Erik" and 8.15 "Nev" releases.

While the upcoming Parsix GNU/Linux 8.15 "Nev" release is still in the works, it gets the same security update as Parsix GNU/Linux 8.10 "Erik," which are being ported from the upstream repositories of Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie" (a.k.a. Debian Stable) to Parsix GNU/Linux's own repos.

It's been a week since our previous report on the security updates pushed to the stable Parsix GNU/Linux repositories, and we're seeing updated versions of the Vim text editor, Apache Tomcat 7 and 8 Java Servlet Containers, as well as Wireshark network protocol analyzer.

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Maui 2.1 "Blue Tang" ISO Fixes Installer Issues, Includes Updated Packages

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GNU
Linux

It's been almost a month since the Maui 2 "Blue Tang" Linux distro arrived based on the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system and KDE Plasma 5.8 LTS desktop environment, and now the first ISO respin is here.

Maui 2.1 is a refreshed installation medium for those who want to install the Ubuntu-based distribution on their personal computers, including various updated packages, but it mainly focuses on fixing various issues reported by users with the Calamares installer since Maui 2.

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GNU/Linux Desktop

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GNU
Linux
  • Meet Pinebook, A Low Cost Linux Laptop That Looks Like A MacBook

    PineBook is a budget laptop running an Allwinner quad-core 64-bit processor. The device comes in two screen sizes both of them having 2GB RAM and 16GB eMMC storage along various ports and connectivity options. PineBook supports a number of Linux distros and Android versions.

  • Meet the Pinebook, a $89 ARM Laptop That Runs Ubuntu

    The Pine64 Pinebook is an ARM laptop priced from $89. It can run Android, ChromiumOS and various flavours of Linux, including Ubuntu.

  • Light and Thin 64-bit ARM based Open Source Notebook
  • The 12 Most Ridiculous Windows Errors of All Time

    Computers and humans are so different. While computers are infinitely faster at processing information, they run into trouble if they try to stray from their course. These “fast idiots” contrast to people, who can’t think as fast as machines but can adapt much more easily.

    These relations have produced some hilarious situations where novice users failed to grasp the basics of using Windows. On the other side of this are error messages. When a computer runs into an unexpected scenario, it usually throws up a message box for the user to review.

Microsoft & Linux & Patents & Tweets

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
Legal

Fact-checking some tweets about Linux Foundation’s newest member and their harvesting of other members’ money.

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Also: Microsoft Loves Linux Patent Tax

Never buying Windows again, eh? How about the Linux powered Oryx Pro?

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The Oryx Pro is the opposite of most of the laptops you have seen reviewed here recently. At 15.2x10.7x1.1" and 5.5lbs it is bulkier than the slim laptops dominating the market, not to mention the 2lb power brick. It also runs Ubuntu 16.04 LTS as opposed to Win10, thankfully the install is well configured for the hardware present according to the review at Ars Technica. The hardware on the other hand is familiar and rather impressive, a desktop class GTX 1060, an i7-6700HQ, 32GB of RAM, and a 256GB SSD. The model reviewed at Ars runs you almost $1900 or there is a 17" model, as well as a GTX 1070 upgrade available if you so desire. Pop by to take a look at the full review of this Linux powered laptop.

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Also: Fedora 25 News & Update: New Linux Based Operating Sytem Available Now; Is This Windows 10, Mac OS Killer?

antiX MX-16 "Metamorphosis" Linux OS Is Just Around the Corner, RC1 Out Now

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GNU
Linux
Debian

During the first days of November, we reported that the antiX MX-16 "Metamorphosis" Linux operating system entered development, and that it will be based on Debian GNU/Linux 8.6 "Jessie".

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