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GNU

Gnuastro 0.16 released

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GNU
Dear all,

I am happy to announce the 16th official release of GNU Astronomy
Utilities (Gnuastro version 0.16).

Gnuastro is an official GNU package, consisting of various
command-line programs and library functions for the manipulation and
analysis of (astronomical) data. All the programs share the same basic
command-line user interface (modeled on GNU Coreutils). For the full
list of Gnuastro's library, programs, and a comprehensive general
tutorial (recommended place to start using Gnuastro), please see the
links below respectively:

https://www.gnu.org/s/gnuastro/manual/html_node/Gnuastro-library.html
https://www.gnu.org/s/gnuastro/manual/html_node/Gnuastro-programs-list.html
https://www.gnu.org/s/gnuastro/manual/html_node/General-program-usage-tutorial.html

For a complete review of the new/changed features in this release,
please see [1] below (also available in the 'NEWS' file within the
source code tarball).

Here is the compressed source and the GPG detached signature for this
release. To uncompress Lzip tarballs, see [2]. To check the validity
of the tarballs using the GPG detached signature (*.sig) see [3]:

  https://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gnuastro/gnuastro-0.16.tar.lz    (3.7MB)
  https://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gnuastro/gnuastro-0.16.tar.gz    (5.9MB)
  https://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gnuastro/gnuastro-0.16.tar.gz.sig (833B)
  https://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gnuastro/gnuastro-0.16.tar.lz.sig (833B)

Here are the SHA1 and SHA256 checksums (other ways to check if the
tarball you download is what we distributed). Just note that the
SHA256 checksum is base64 encoded, instead of the hexadecimal encoding
that most checksum tools default to.

fe1f84bf1be270f1a62091e9a5f89bb94b182154  gnuastro-0.16.tar.lz
B4hftfYuyc7x3I6aEJ2SQlkp6x7zOOrPz/bK2koGuR8  gnuastro-0.16.tar.lz
1ae00673648fe8db5630f1de9d70b49fadb42d7d  gnuastro-0.16.tar.gz
kMEdJbsFrRNxDLX4EXntgXNgikJv3/2LIEWGLV/e4i0  gnuastro-0.16.tar.gz

For this release, Pedram Ashofteh Ardakani, Natáli D. Anzanello,
Sepideh Eskandarlou, Raúl Infante-Sainz, Vladimir Markelov and Zahra
Sharbaf directly contributed to the source of Gnuastro, I am very
grateful to all of them. I should also thank Alejandro Serrano
Borlaff, Fernando Buitrago, Mark Calabretta, Zohreh Ghaffari, Giulia
Golini, Leslie Hunt, Raúl Infante-Sainz, Matthias Kluge, Juan Miro,
Juan Molina Tobar, Markus Schaney, Zahra Sharbaf, Vincenzo Testa,
Ignacio Trujillo and Aaron Watkins for their very good suggestions or
bug reports that have been implemented in Gnuastro 0.16.

If any of Gnuastro's programs or libraries are useful in your work,
please cite _and_ acknowledge them. For citation and acknowledgment
guidelines, run the relevant programs with a `--cite' option (it can
be different for different programs, so run it for all the programs
you use). Citations _and_ acknowledgments are vital for the continued
work on Gnuastro, so please don't forget to support us by doing so.

This tarball was bootstrapped (created) with the tools below. Note
that you don't need these to build Gnuastro from the tarball, these
are the tools that were used to make the tarball itself. They are only
mentioned here to be able to reproduce/recreate this tarball later.
  Texinfo 6.8
  Autoconf 2.71
  Automake 1.16.4
  Help2man 1.48.5
  ImageMagick 7.1.0-9
  Gnulib v0.1-4944-g7fc3219bc
  Autoconf archives v2021.02.19-29-g0fbee2a

The dependencies to build Gnuastro from this tarball on your system
are described here:
  https://www.gnu.org/s/gnuastro/manual/html_node/Dependencies.html

Best wishes,
Mohammad

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New Videos: Jargon, the 'Bad Linus', and KDE

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GNU
Linux

Sujeevan Vijayakumaran: All-remote workspace at home

Filed under
Development
GNU
Linux

It’s been a little over 1,5 years since I joined GitLab as my first all remote company. About half a year ago, I wrote about what I learned in one year at GitLab. In this blog post I will describe my setup how I work because I got several questions about it over the last time. I can also blame dnsmichi who published a similar post about his setup Wink.

I can certainly recommend the page about “Considerations for a Productive Home Office or Remote Workspace“ in the GitLab Handbook about All-Remote.

[...]

I used to have Thinkpads in the past, but I recently switched to Dell XPS. I have two Dell XPS 13. One for work (in white) and one private (in black).

While I personally prefer to run ArchLinux (btw I use Arch!) I’m running the latest Ubuntu LTS on my work laptop.

The laptop is connected to a CalDigit TS3-Plus which is my docking station. This was one of the few docking station which supported 4K@60Hz back when I bought this. I would prefer a docking station with more USB-ports. Right now I have another USB-Hub (hidden under the desktop) because the ports provided by most of the docking stations out there are not really enough for me.

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What desktop Linux needs to succeed in the mainstream

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GNU
Linux

The Linus Tech Tips YouTube channel has been putting out a series of videos called the Switching to Linux Challenge that has been causing a bit of a stir in the Linux community. I’ve been keeping an eye on these developments, and thought it was a good time to weigh in with my thoughts. This article focuses on what Linux needs to do better — I have also written a companion article, “How new Linux users can increase their odds of success”, which looks at the other side of the problem.

Linux is not accessible to the average user today, and I didn’t need to watch these videos to understand that. I do not think that it is reasonable today to expect a non-expert user to successfully install and use Linux for their daily needs without a “Linux friend” holding their hand every step of the way.

This is not a problem unless we want it to be. It is entirely valid to build software which is accommodating of experts only, and in fact this is the kind of software I focus on in my own work. I occasionally use the racecar analogy: you would not expect the average driver to be able to drive a Formula 1 racecar. It is silly to suggest that Formula 1 vehicle designs ought to accommodate non-expert drivers, or that professional racecar drivers should be driving mini-vans on the circuit. However, it is equally silly to design a professional racing vehicle and market it to soccer moms.

I am one of the original developers of the Sway desktop environment for Linux. I am very proud of Sway, and I believe that it represents one of the best desktop experiences on Linux. It is a rock-solid, high-performance, extremely stable desktop which is polished on a level that is competitive with commercial products. However, it is designed for me: a professional, expert-level Linux user. I am under no illusions that it is suitable for my grandmother.

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How new Linux users can increase their odds of success

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GNU
Linux

The Linus Tech Tips YouTube channel has been putting out a series of videos called the Switching to Linux Challenge that has been causing a bit of a stir in the Linux community. I’ve been keeping an eye on these developments, and thought it was a good time to weigh in with my thoughts. This article focuses on how new Linux users can increase their odds for success — I have also written a companion article, “What desktop Linux needs to succeed in the mainstream”, which looks at the other side of the problem.

Linux is, strictly speaking, an operating system kernel, which is a small component of a larger system. However, in the common usage, Linux refers to a family of operating systems which are based on this kernel, such as Ubuntu, Fedora, Arch Linux, Alpine Linux, and so on, which are referred to as distributions. Linux is used in other contexts, such as Android, but the common usage is generally limited to this family of Linux “distros”. Several of these distros have positioned themselves for various types of users, such as office workers or gamers. However, the most common Linux user is much different. What do they look like?

The key distinction which sets Linux apart from more common operating systems like Windows and macOS is that Linux is open source. This means that the general public has access to the source code which makes it tick, and that anyone can modify it or improve it to suit their needs. However, to make meaningful modifications to Linux requires programming skills, so, consequentially, the needs which Linux best suits are the needs of programmers. Linux is the preeminent operating system for programmers and other highly technical computer users, for whom it can be suitably molded to purpose in a manner which is not possible using other operating systems. As such, it has been a resounding success on programmer’s workstations, on servers in the cloud, for data analysis and science, in embedded workloads like internet-of-things, and other highly technical domains where engineering talent is available and a profound level of customization is required.

The Linux community has also developed Linux as a solution for desktop users, such as the mainstream audience of Windows and macOS. However, this work is mostly done by enthusiasts, rather than commercial entities, so it can vary in quality and generally any support which is available is offered on a community-run, best-effort basis. Even so, there have always been a lot of volunteers interested in this work — programmers want a working desktop, too. Programmers also want to play games, so there has been interest in getting a good gaming setup working on Linux. In the past several years, there has also been a commercial interest with the budget to move things forward: Valve Software. Valve has been instrumental in developing more sophisticated gaming support on Linux, and uses Linux as the basis of a commercial product, the Steam Deck

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19 Absolute Simple Things About Linux Terminal Every Ubuntu User Should Know

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GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

Terminal often intimidates new users. However, once you get to know it, you gradually start liking it. Well, that happens with most Linux users.

Even if you are using Ubuntu as a desktop system, you may have to enter the terminal at times. New users are often clueless about many things. Some knowledge of basic Linux commands always helps in such cases but this article is not about that.

This article focuses on explaining small, basic and often ignored things about using the terminal. This should help new Ubuntu desktop users to know the terminal and use it with slightly more efficiency.
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New Videos: Python Hate, Learning GNU/Linux, and Common Ways Arch Linux & Rolling Releases Break

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GNU
Linux

Windows Vs Linux: 7 Reasons To Switch To Linux

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

The view that Linux is a server operating system only is an outdated view. There are hundreds of Linux distributions designed specifically to be beneficial for the average desktop/laptop user, and it is perhaps time you consider switching to Linux from Windows.

When we talk about switching to Linux, we talk about using distributions like Ubuntu or Linux Mint instead of your Windows installation. Of course, you don’t have to get rid of Windows at the same day either; you can install Linux side by side with Windows if you wish, until you have finally made your mind about it.

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Barry's Latest Progress With EasyOS Development

Filed under
Development
GNU
Linux
  • Balsa email client

    I have chosen an older gtk2 version, 2.4.7, as it has configure choices that suit EasyOS. For example:
    It integrates with Osmo personal information manager. I haven't tested this, so don't know how it works.
    It uses the libgtkhtml v2 library to render HTML emails. This is great, as libgtkhtml v2 is already in EasyOS, used by helpsurfer local document viewer, and Osmo.

  • JWM menu button text is broken

    I want to bring out a new release of EasyOS in a couple of days, so if the problem isn't resolved quickly, I will roll back to 1685. Actually, 1685 works fine, I have had no issues with it, so really why upgrade just because there is a later version?

  • Kernel 5.10.83 compiled

    It was compiled with the 5.10.39 kernel, but was removed afterward.

    OK, it has returned. It must be understood of course, that the wl.ko module conflicts with others, hence has to be a separate PET. It means that every time you upgrade to a later version of EasyOS that has a later kernel, you will have to un-install the PET and install the one that matches the new kernel.

  • Mapping all download folders to one folder

    With the introduction of non-root client applications, there are multiple download folders. For example, firefox runs as user 'firefox', with home folder 'home/firefox', and default download path /home/firefox/Downloads'.

    OK, but if we have more non-root client apps, each with its own Download folder, it is starting to become inconvenient. Perhaps. Forum member hundido was showing a grandma how to use EasyOS, and she liked it, except for all these different download paths...

What Is ’Apt-Get’ In Linux?

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GNU
Linux

Despite being accused of “hard to use” operating system, GNU/Linux OSes are fantastic free alternatives to Windows and macOS. Despite the growing list of Linux distributions, Linux is now as straightforward and intuitive as other operating systems. Unlike Windows, which only allows you to install apps from .exe files and the Windows Store, Linux has APT (Advanced Package Tool), which handles the installation and removal of packages/apps in the operating system.

If you want to install a program on Linux, you’ll need to use the term apt-get, but what exactly is it, and what does it do? In this article, let’s sudo apt get-started to find out what apt-get is.

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