Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

GNU

Free software is what unites us

Filed under
GNU

This spring, as the time for planning our biannual appeal came around, we discussed the difficult time all of us are experiencing: charities like us, the free software community, and every individual. And it led us to consider why people from all walks of life cherish user freedom.

The socially distant, digital way in which we are carrying on our work and private lives is affecting our software freedom. Globally, decisions to transition to an online and remote life were made with less consideration than we normally put into them, giving proprietary corporations access to parts of our lives we normally protect. Lately, we have been pointing to grim examples of bulk surveillance and privacy violations in the realms of education and communication to help everyone understand why this fight is so important.

But we shouldn't forget that free software is an inherently positive story. It celebrates the creativity and skill that come from collaboration, and the freedom that you have if you understand a program or can freely choose to rely on information about it from someone you trust. Having the right to read, modify, contribute to, and share software we use has changed our lives, and countless others. There are so many people who continue to motivate us to fight for free software with their work, so we decided to ask them to share their stories on why they love free software, and what user freedom means to them or their business.

Read more

Audiocasts/Shows: BSD Now, Going Linux, Self-Hosted and TLLTS

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD
  • BSD Now 359: Throwaway Browser

    Throw-Away Browser on FreeBSD With "pot" within 5 minutes, OmniOS as OpenBSD guest with bhyve, BSD vs Linux distro development, My FreeBSD Laptop Build, FreeBSD CURRENT Binary Upgrades, and more.

  • Going Linux #394 · Manjaro Linux Overview

    Bill searches for a non-Debian-based distribution that is suitable for Linux newcomers. He finds one in Manjaro!
    Episode 394 Time Stamps
    00:00 Going Linux #394 · Manjaro Linux Overview
    01:51 Rolling release
    04:02 An Arch-based distribution for new Linux users
    05:46 Windows vs. Manjaro on Dell Latitude 5450
    10:13 Performance comparison after installation
    13:09 The promise of perpetual upgrades
    13:59 Installing Manjaro
    14:44 The updates
    16:56 Compared with other distros best for new Linux users
    17:37 Default browser (Midori)
    19:12 Manjaro Hello (Welcome)
    21:30 Obtaining and installing software
    24:12 Universal package format support
    27:57 The community support
    29:49 Manjaro: New user distro
    32:25 A note on hybrid graphics
    35:20 Overall: 'Thumbs up'
    38:04 goinglinux.com, goinglinux@gmail.com, +1-904-468-7889, @goinglinux, feedback, listen, subscribe
    39:04 End

  • Shields Up | Self-Hosted 23

    We've spent thousands of dollars, and over a decade refining the perfect home media setup. We get nostalgic and share what worked, and what REALLY didn't.

  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 866

    terminal-quest, kano products, pi, stuff

10 Best Free Tiling Window Managers

Filed under
GNU
Linux

A window manager is software that manages the windows that applications bring up. For example, when you start an application, there will be a window manager running in the background, responsible for the placement and appearance of windows.

It is important not to confuse a window manager with a desktop environment. A desktop environment typically consists of icons, windows, toolbars, folders, wallpapers, and desktop widgets. They provide a collection of libraries and applications made to operate cohesively together. A desktop environment contains its own window manager.

There are a few different types of window managers. This article focuses on tiling window managers. They automate the common task of arranging windows.

Read more

EasyOS 2.3.3 released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

A new release for the new forum!

Read more

Also: EasyPup 2.3.3 released

Mozilla Explains VPN and Neglects GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Moz/FF

  • No-judgment digital definitions: VPNs explained

    Many of us spend multiple hours a day using the internet to do everyday things like watching videos, shopping, gaming and paying bills, all the way to managing complex work projects and having confidential video calls. A virtual private network (VPN) is one of the best ways to stay private and secure online, and keep your personal data protected.

    [...]

    Connecting to a public WiFi network is at times convenient, like when you’re without internet service or can’t get any bars on your phone. On the other hand, connecting to public WiFi can be a risky endeavor. It’s impossible to be sure that someone else isn’t connecting to the same network to snoop on what you’re doing. Even if your traffic is encrypted they can still see which sites you are visiting. And if you’re using an app that doesn’t have encryption — and even today, many don’t — then they can see everything you are doing.

    When you’re at home, the risk of bad actors showing up on your home network is lower. However, your internet service provider (ISP) can track and share your online activities because all the data that you access on the web is routed through your ISP’s network, some of which may not be encrypted. A VPN can prevent ISPs from spying on you by encrypting your traffic to your VPN provider no matter where you are.

  • Mozilla VPN Goes Live …But Not For Linux Users

    Mozilla’s VPN service has officially launched in six countries, but Linux users will find they can’t take advantage of the tech just yet.

    The new subscription-based privacy service is available to web surfers in the USA, the UK, Canada, New Zealand and several other locales from today. But, frustratingly for tux fans, it requires a Windows, Android, and/or iOS system to use.

    The good news is that Mozilla VPN Linux support is on the way. The company hasn’t shared an exact timeline on when to expect it but says it is “coming soon” to more devices and platforms.

    The benefits of using a VPN are fairly well known at this point: better security on public wi-fi; anonymous surfing and no IP logging; and network-level encryption. And since Mozilla VPN runs on over 280 servers in 30+ countries it should provide dependable with less downtime too.

Purism "Investing in Real Convergence" and Purism Librem 14

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

  • Investing in Real Convergence

    Like “privacy” and “security” the word “convergence” has become a popular term these days. When words like these become popular, companies tend to redefine them to match whatever they happen to sell. For instance when Google says they protect your privacy they mean “from everyone but us.” When Apple says they are secure, they mean “as long as you give us full trust and total control.”

    When most people think of the promise of convergence they think of what I’ll refer to as “real convergence”–the idea of a single, portable computer that has your data and applications and that can be a desktop computer, a laptop or a pocket computer. To summarize: real convergence means taking your desktop computer with you in your pocket wherever you go. Fake convergence is the opposite: stretching a phone to fit on a larger screen.

  • Purism Librem 14

    The next generation of Librem laptop brings a lot to the table. Gigabit throughput over native RJ45 enables you to enjoy blazing-fast download speeds, security, and reliability. Compared to the Librem 13, the Librem 14 has a similar device footprint while the Intel 10th Gen Comet Lake i7 is much more powerful.

Don't let proprietary digital voting disrupt democracy

Filed under
GNU

Here at the Free Software Foundation (FSF), we fight for the freedom of all software users. We believe that everyone has the right to understand and study the systems that they use, and that not being able to exercise this right is a violation of our freedom. This applies to our personal software usage, but becomes even more important in processes of democracy. It is particularly relevant for the upcoming November 2020 elections in the United States.

A free country has the responsibility to make sure all of its citizens can be heard, and that voting processes are transparent and fair. So what happens if people are still self-isolating in November, in order to try and prevent a second wave of the novel coronavirus? As more of our life processes have gone online due to the pandemic, we have seen debates rise over a call for mail-in voting. This discussion seems to be clearing a path for a renewed interest in online voting software as a remote alternative to in-person voting. This is cause for grave concern.

I am arguing in this post that it is essential that software used in any part of the voting process be published free software. It is unacceptable for such an important democratic system to be placed in the hands of any for-profit, proprietary software corporation that controls the source code, data management, reporting, updates, and testing. No good can come from requiring a court order to be permitted to study the source code of voting software in order to confirm the process is fair and democratic. But additionally, I might surprise the reader by laying out arguments to say that despite supporting the wish to increase access and ease for all eligible voters, the only truly free, ethical, and democratic voting system is actually a system that steers clear from using software.

Read more

Cinnamon Desktop Review: A Very User-Friendly Desktop Environment

Filed under
GNU
Linux

A sometimes-forgotten Linux Desktop Environment, Cinnamon is a contender for your desktop that you may not have seen coming. While Cinnamon is developed by the Linux Mint team as a flagship for their distribution, it is also available to download and use on any other distro. This article covers Cinnamon desktop in depth, exploring the user experience and customization options, performance, usability, and recommendations for who should use Cinnamon.

Read more

Endeavour OS: Our first anniversary, the July release and what’s next?!?

Filed under
GNU
Linux

We’ve reached a memorable milestone, today it is one year ago that we made our fantastic debut in the Linux universe and boy, what a year it has been!

I’ve already said it in previous blog posts, on our forum and on our Telegram group, but that fuel is provided by you, a friendly, energetic and loyal community and I’ll say it again, we’re so grateful to you all.

EndeavourOS had very big shoes to fill in the first place, we weren’t starting with an entirely blank canvas, unlike any new starting project. The mission was to give the former Antergos community a new home and at the same time develop our own identity. According to the familiar faces and the many new ones, we had the honour to welcome in our community this past year, I think it’s safe to say that we’ve succeeded that mission.

One year has passed with big learning curves and challenging goals that seemed unreachable but we conquered them anyway and now it’s time for EndeavourOS to re-enter the atmosphere and heralded by a twin sonic boom to announce its landing back to base…

Read more

The Supercomputing Monoculture

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server
Hardware

But that very competition led to fragmentation. Alpha, MIPS, SPARC, and all the others each sold to a small niche of users. Meanwhile, Intel was selling x86 processors by the truckload to every PC maker on the planet while backing up forklifts full of cash into its bank vaults. The x86 franchise was an obscenely lucrative cash cow, even if some engineers ridiculed it as outmoded technology. Intel sold more processors than all the other vendors put together. And CPU development is expensive. Very expensive. One by one, the boutique CPU makers (Sun, Digital, Silicon Graphics, Intergraph, et al.) gave up on their in-house designs and started buying commercial processors, often from Intel. And, one by one, those companies failed anyway. PCs running Windows on x86 were ubiquitous and cheap. Artisanal Unix workstations running proprietary RISC processors were expensive – and not much faster than a PC anyway. The full-custom route just didn’t add up.

The huge uptake in x86-based supercomputers starting around 2005 wasn’t because Intel chips got a lot faster (although they did). It’s because most of the other competitors defaulted. They left an empty field for Intel to dominate. If the brains behind Alpha (to pick just one example) had had Intel levels of R&D money to work with, they probably would have stayed near the top of the performance heap for as long as they cared to. But that’s not reality or how the game is played. If my grandmother had wheels she’d be a wagon.

Now the same story is playing out again, but in ARM’s favor. ARM has the volume lead, beating even Intel by orders of magnitude in terms of unit volume. And, although ARM collects only a small royalty on each processor, not the entire purchase price, it also doesn’t have the crushing overhead costs that a manufacturer like Intel carries. ARM’s volume encourages a third-party software market to flourish, and that fuels a virtuous feedback loop that makes ARM’s architecture even more popular. There’s nothing inherently fast about ARM’s architecture – it definitely wasn’t designed for supercomputers – but there’s nothing wrong with it, either. If the x86 can hold the world’s performance lead, any CPU can. All it takes is time and volume.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Security-Oriented Kodachi Linux 7.2 Released with One of the Best Secure Messengers

Based on the latest Xubuntu 18.04 LTS point release, Kodachi Linux 7.2 codename “Defeat” comes with the newest Ubuntu kernel that’s patched against recent security vulnerabilities and full sync with the upstream Bionic Beaver repositories to provide users with an up-to-date installation media. On top of that, the new release introduces new security features, such as Session Messenger, a popular private messenger that the Kodachi Linux team doubts as one of the best secure messengers and the Steghide UI utility for hiding encrypted text messages in images, text or audio files. Read more

Linux and Linux Foundation: 5.9 Kernel and LF Edge

  • Intel SERIALIZE, Dropping Of SGI UV Supercomputer, i386 Clang'ing Hit Linux 5.9

    A number of x86-related changes were sent out today for the first full day of the Linux 5.9 merge window. 

  •         
  • Btrfs Seeing Some Nice Performance Improvements For Linux 5.9

    With more eyes on Btrfs given the file-system is set to become the default for Fedora 33 desktop spins, there are some interesting performance optimizations coming to Btrfs with the in-development Linux 5.9 kernel.  On the performance front for Btrfs in Linux 5.9 there are optimized helpers for little-endian architectures to avoid little/big endian conversions around the on-disk format, tree-log/fsync optimizations yielding around a 12% lower maximum latency for the Dbench benchmark, faster mount times for large file-systems in the terabyte range, and parallel fsync optimizations. 

  • As IoT Continues to Evolve, LF Edge Explores the Edge Continuum in a New White Paper

    Earlier this month, LF Edge, an umbrella organization under The Linux Foundation, published a white paper updating the industry on their continued ecosystem collaboration. LF Edge brings together projects within the Foundation, that “aims to establish an open, interoperable framework for edge computing independent of hardware, silicon, cloud, or operating system.”

Open Hardware With Arduino: Counter and MKR ZERO

  • Keep track of your laps in the pool with this Arduino counter

    PeterQuinn925 swims for exercise, and to train for the occasional triathlon, but when doing so he often zones out and forgets how many laps he has swam. To solve this problem without spending a lot of money on a commercial solution, he created his own counter using an Arduino Nano and an ultrasonic sensor. The sensor detects when a swimmer approaches, and the system calculates distance based on this, assuming that a lap is roughly 50 yards or meters. This info is announced audibly via a speaker/amplifier using an Arduino speech library and is shown on a 7-segment display.

  • Recreating Rosie the Robot with a MKR ZERO

    While 2020 may seem like a very futuristic year, we still don’t have robotic maids like the Jetsons’ Rosie the Robot. For his latest element14 Presents project, DJ Harrigan decided to create such a bot as a sort of animatronic character, using an ESP8266 board for interface and overall control, and a MKR ZERO to play stored audio effects. The device features a moveable head, arms and eyes, and even has a very clever single-servo gear setup to open and close its mouth.