Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

GNU

Audiocasts/Shows: Bad Voltage, BSDnow, and The Linux Link Tech Show (TLLTS)

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Bad Voltage 3×36: Nor Any Drop

    We review the 8Sleep Pod Pro Cover, an internet-connected mattress, which Jono claims is actually useful. There is, not surprisingly, some scepticism about this claim, but equally: sleep is important and basically nobody gets enough of it. So let’s have a look!

  • BSDnow 422: The Brian Callahan Interview

    We interview Dr. Brian Callahan about his language porting work for OpenBSD, teaching with BSDs and recruiting students into projects, research, and his work at NYC*BUG in this week’s episode of BSDnow.

  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 924

    tech support woes the end, food, lifestyles, amazon robot

MediaGoblin 0.12.0: Potions

Filed under
GNU
Software

Happy Software Freedom Day! Today we're pleased to announce the release of MediaGoblin 0.12.0. See the release notes for full details and upgrading instructions.

This release resolves two significant issues in the Celery backend media processing. The first was causing processed media to be marked as failed and the second was inhibiting useful error messages. We've also resolved installation issues caused by deprecated upstream code in the Werkzeug and jsonschema libraries.

Read more

5 Best Linux Distros to Learn Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Linux is one of the most powerful operating systems, powering numerous devices all across the globe. Linux is free and open-source that drives the foundation of major infrastructure, for example, the internet. It’s a powerful operating system that can bring the most out of your machine and productivity.
For new users, however, getting into Linux can be daunting. There are numerous choices and technicalities. This “newness” factor can be overwhelming for many. In practice, Linux is not as difficult as it seems.

This guide will explore some of the best Linux distros to consider if you’re willing to learn Linux.

Let’s have a look at Windows. It comes with all the necessary binaries and libraries packed in one. Microsoft internally develops and distributes these parts. If you’re willing to use Windows, then you have to use the version Microsoft is offering.

In the case of Linux, that’s not the case. Each component of Linux is available separately. Each of the components is developed by various organizations and communities. Most of these components are open-source and available free of cost.

In theory, you could grab all the components you need, bake them together, and build your own Linux system. However, that’s quite a tedious task. This is where Linux distros come in. Any distro comes with all the necessary components and some additional components and tweaks.

Read more

General Motors Announces its New Linux-based Vehicle Software Platform Called ?Ultifi' That Will Reimagine Car Ownership

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Cars of the future will be more like connected devices on wheels and software-based, allowing customers to add new functions and features to their vehicles just as easily as downloading apps to a smartphone. Software based vehicles can also be kept up to date by receiving regular over-the-air updates to add new features and functionality.
Building vehicles that are more like smartphones is a model pioneered in the auto industry by electric automaker Tesla, but now legacy automakers are making plans to transition to software based vehicles, the latest is U.S. automaker General Motors.
The company on Tuesday announced a new end-to-end vehicle software platform called "Ultifi" that will underpin its future vehicles. The platform was designed entirely in-house and will allow GM and its customers the ability to add new vehicle features and functions and personalization options so cusomters can make their vehicles an extension of their digital lives.

Read more

IC Shortage Keeps Linux Out Of Phone Charger, For Now

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

We’ve been eagerly following the development of the WiFiWart for some time now, as a quad-core Cortex-A7 USB phone charger with dual WiFi interfaces that runs OpenWrt sounds exactly like the sort of thing we need in our lives. Unfortunately, we’ve just heard from [Walker] that progress on the project has been slowed down indefinitely by crippling chip shortages.

At this point, we’ve all heard how the chip shortage is impacting the big players out there. It makes sense that automakers are feeling the pressure, since they are buying literally millions of components at a clip. But stories like this are a reminder that even an individual’s hobby project can be sidelined by parts that are suddenly 40 times as expensive as they were when you first put them in your bill of materials.

Read more

Audiocasts/Shows: Why GNU/Linux, Brave Talk, Ubuntu Kylin 21.10 Beta, Coder Radio, and FLOSS Weekly

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Want To Save The Planet? Install Linux! - Invidious

    One of the most often asked questions that I get is "Why do you run Linux?" There are many reasons that I personally run Linux, but maybe the most important reason is this: Linux can help save the environment!

  • Brave Talk: Reselling Jitsi As A Privacy Chat - Invidious

    Recently Brave opened up public access to their new chat service Brave Talk except it's not actually a new chat service it's literally just Jitsi with a couple on minor CSS tweaks

  • Ubuntu Kylin 21.10 Beta

    Today we are looking at Ubuntu Kylin 21.10 Beta. It comes with Linux Kernel 5.13 and uses about 800MB to 1GB of ram when idling. Enjoy!

  • Ubuntu Kylin 21.10 Beta Run Through - Invidious

    In this video, we are looking at Ubuntu Kylin 21.10 Beta.

  • Falling for FastAPI | Coder Radio 433

    Mike's falling in love with FastAPI and gives us a hint at the next project he's building.

    Plus, our thoughts on employee machine monitoring and building a transition plan when you are ready to quit your job.

  • FLOSS Weekly 649: Open Firmware

    Daniel Maslowski joins Doc Searls and Dan Lynch to talk about open firmware. Open firmware is an almost ironic term, especially for IP cameras, given the proprietary purposes of most manufacturers. There is a large and active community of code and developments around open firmware, led largely in part by Maslowski.

Manjaro ARM Beta16 of Phosh for PinePhone!

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gadgets

The Manjaro ARM project is proud to announce our sixteenth BETA release for the PinePhone running Phosh!

Read more

Audiocasts/Shows: Windowxfx 11, mintCast, and LINUX Unplugged

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Wireguard vs OpenVPN on NordVPN with T-Mobile Home Internet on Debian GNU/Linux. Bonus: T-Mobile Home Internet Nokia modem has bad WiFi defaults.

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Before Private Internet Access went to hell, I once spoke to their former tech support people about Windows 10 in their IRC chat room, and “Max-P” told me that writing VPN software for Windows was the worst part of the job. He said that preventing “leakage”, that is, where your kill switch doesn’t work and your traffic spills out onto the open internet, which is what you bought the VPN to avoid, is very difficult to ensure on Windows.

Furthermore, it’s hard to get any decent sort of throughput on a VPN in Windows, because Windows doesn’t have any sort of usable and secure VPN tech included in the OS. In fact, NordVPN says that if you try using IKEv2 in Windows 10, it will sabotage it by using weak cryptography. (“Note: the Windows system configuration downgrades the cipher to the weaker 3DES-CBC encryption.“)

Most Windows VPN software use “WinTun” to route traffic around and are essentially rate limited and use a ton of CPU time for overhead. That is, doing nothing important at all and tying up system resources. Creating more bottlenecks due to inherently bad design.

The VPN situation on Linux is….better. If it doesn’t make your networking stack great again, it’ll at least help make it tolerable. You can set up NetworkManager and bypass VPN software entirely, and use OpenVPN binaries from your Linux distribution, or you can use something like NordVPN’s client which makes things a little bit simpler, hopefully, with commands like “nordvpn c”, “nordvpn d”, “nordvpn set autoconnect on”, “nordvpn set killswitch on” and so on.

It takes but a few minutes to understand how to use NordVPN’s LInux software, and unlike the Windows version, there isn’t all sorts of nasty stuff going on behind the scenes. The killswitch is just firewall rules. There doesn’t need to be a lot of crazy stuff going on that can make your internet connection unusable if the connection drops out until you reboot the computer, which is what often happens on Windows 10. Also, their client for Linux doesn’t pop up notifications to go read their blog posts.

Read more

Videos: Ubuntu Budgie 21.10 Beta and Easy Anti Cheat + Battleye Now Supported on Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Kernel and Graphics: Intel, AMD, and NVIDIA

  • Intel teases 'software-defined silicon' with Linux kernel contribution – and won't say why

    Intel has teased a new tech it calls "Software Defined Silicon" (SDSi) but is saying almost nothing about it – and has told The Register it could amount to nothing. SDSi popped up around three weeks ago in a post to the Linux Kernel mailing list, in which an Intel Linux software engineer named David Box described it as "a post-manufacturing mechanism for activating additional silicon features".

  • RadeonSI Lands Another "Very Large" Optimization To Further Boost SPECViewPerf - Phoronix

    In recent months we have seen a lot of RadeonSI optimizations focused on SPECViewPerf with AMD seemingly trying to get this open-source OpenGL driver into very capable shape moving forward for workstation GL workloads. Hitting Mesa 22.0-devel today is yet another round of patches for tuning SPECViewPerf.

  • Vendors Including NVIDIA Talk Up New OpenCL Extensions For Vulkan Interop, NN Inference - Phoronix

    Last Friday night we spotted OpenCL 3.0.9 with several new extensions included. Today The Khronos Group is formally announcing these latest OpenCL additions focused on Vulkan interoperability as well as neural network inferencing. These new extensions for OpenCL 3.0 include an integer dot product extension for neural network inferencing (cl_khr_integer_dot_product) with a focus on 8-bit integer support.

  • RadeonSI Enables NGG Shader Culling For Navi 1x Consumer GPUs - Phoronix

    As another possible performance win for RadeonSI Gallium3D as AMD's open-source Radeon OpenGL driver on Linux systems is enabling of NGG culling for Navi 1x consumer graphics processors rather than limiting it only to newer Navi 2x (RDNA2) GPUs. Merged on Monday was a patch to enable shader culling for Navi 1x consumer SKUs with no longer limiting it to Navi 2x / GFX10.3 or when using various debug options. This culling was also enabled for Navi 1x GPUs but only for the "Pro" graphics SKUs.

Databases: Managing Database Migrations, PostgreSQL-Related Releases

KDE Plasma 5.18.8, Bugfix Release for October

Plasma 5.18 was released in February 2020 with many feature refinements and new modules to complete the desktop experience. Read more

today's howtos

  • Speak to me! – Purism

    My trusty laptop’s speakers gave up the ghost. I don’t like to sit around in headphones all the time, I don’t have any other speakers, and the replacements are still being manhandled by the postman. I’d get used to the austerity if I hadn’t started missing calls from a friend. That’s unacceptable! But what am I supposed to do? Buy extra gadgets just to throw them away after a week? Nope, I’m not that kind of a person. But hey – I have a Librem 5! It has a speaker. It’s open. I have control over it, and I’m a hacker too. So I should be able to come up with a hack to turn it into a speaker for my laptop, right? Pulseaudio to the rescue. I look through the guide. There it is: forwarding audio over a network.

  • How To Install CSF Firewall on Debian 11 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install CSF Firewall on Debian 11. For those of you who didn’t know, CSF is also known as “Config Server Firewall” is a free and advanced firewall for Linux systems. We should use ConfigServer Security & Firewall (CSF) since this CSF have more advanced and comprehensive features than other firewall application such as UFW, Firewalld, or Iptables. Compared to the other Linux firewall application, CSF is more user-friendly and effective which is mostly used by web hosting providers. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step-by-step installation of the ConfigServer Security & Firewall (CSF) on a Debian 11 (Bullseye).

  • What are the differences between SQL and MySQL | FOSS Linux

    Due to many organizations, businesses, companies, and firms making an online presence, databases have become the core requirement for their daily operations. A database in a layman’s language is defined as a collection of data stored and organized electronically to ensure easy retrieval, access, management, and manipulation of business data. Most business successes depend on databases since they aid in storing essential and relevant data in a central position. Besides, databases also help facilitate communication of crucial business info such as employee profiles, sales transactions, customer profiles, marketing campaigns, product inventory, etc. Furthermore, databases have ensured that the company’s data is secure through various authentication mechanisms like access specifiers, user logins, and sign-ups. This article will talk about the difference between the two popular relational databases SQL and MySQL.

  • How to install Funkin' Psych Engine on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install Friday Night Funkin' Psych Engine on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

  • How to Use an SSH Key with Non-root Users - Unixcop

    You can SSH to your Linux instance as root with the key. However, the key doesn’t work for non-root users. So we will illustrate two methods to use SSH keys with non-root users.

  • Allow Port Through Firewall in Ubuntu 20.04 - Linux Nightly

    Ubuntu comes with ufw (uncomplicated firewall) installed by default. This is a frontend for iptables/nftables, the built-in Linux firewall, and is meant to make firewall management a bit easier. In this guide, you’ll see how to add rules to the firewall to open ports and allow certain services to have access through the firewall on Ubuntu.

  • Some regex tests with grep, sed and AWK

    In my data work I regularly do searching and filtering with GNU grep (version 3.3), GNU sed (4.7) and GNU AWK (4.2.1). I don't know if they all use the same regex engine, but I've noticed differences in regex speed between these three programs. This post documents some of the differences.

  • Upgrade to Fedora 35 from Fedora 34 using DNF – If Not True Then False

    This is guide, howto upgrade Fedora 34 to Fedora 35 using DNF. This method works on desktop and server machines. You can also upgrade older Fedora installations (example Fedora 33/32/31/30) directly to Fedora 35. I have tested this method on several machines, but if you have problems, please let me know. Always remember backup, before upgrade!

  • Jenkins: Basic security settings - Anto ./ Online

    Jenkins contains sensitive information. Thus it must be secured, like any other sensitive platform. Thankfully Jenkins provides you with many security options. This guide will show you all the essential bits that you need to know. You access these features on the Configure Global Security page under manage Jenkins.

  • LDAP query from Python · Pablo Iranzo Gómez's blog

    Recently, some colleagues commented about validating if users in a Telegram group were or not employees anymore, so that the process could be automated without having to chase down the users that left the company. One of the fields that can be configured by each user, is the link to other platforms (Github, LinkedIn, Twitter, Telegram, etc), so querying an LDAP server could suffice to get the list of users. First, we need to get some data required, in our case, we do anonymous binding to our LDAP server and the field to search for containing the ‘other platform’ links.