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Devices: Wi-Fi, Vecow, Arduino, Ghidra for Firmware Deciphering

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Hardware
  • Responding to Growing Demand, Edgewater Launches Wi-Fi Spectrum Slicing Development Kit

    Wi-Fi Spectrum Slicing offers breakthrough performance, slicing available spectrum, and exposing a new level of Wi-Fi spectrum granularity for developers to exploit. Edgewater’s groundbreaking MCSR™ silicon solutions and advanced Linux drivers allow the global Linux community to use the widely adopted Linux and OpenWrt software platforms to harness Edgewater’s technology and invent new and creative applications for the platform.

  • Rugged Kaby Lake vehicle PC does it all on the road or rail

    Vecow’s Linux-friendly “IVH-9024MX ICY” in-vehicle PC runs on a 7th or 6th Gen Core or Xeon CPUs and offers triple displays, 6x SATA bays, 4x PoE+ ports, 2x mini-PCIe, and EN50155: 2017 and EN45545-2 railway compliance.

    Vecow unveiled the rugged IVH-9024MX ICY back in June as an all-purpose in-vehicle and rolling-stock computer and this week announced certifications for EN50155 and EN45545-2 (fire protection) railway safety standards. This is the first 7th Gen Kaby Lake based fanless embedded system to receive these certifications, claims Vecow.

  • Get started with... Arduino?

    Yes, you read that title right, and no, you haven’t accidentally stumbled upon the Arduino Foundation’s website. Today, we’re pleased to announce a new addition to the Raspberry Pi Press family: Get Started with Arduino, a complete how-to guide to help you get hands on with the other pocket-sized board.

  • Exploring Zyxel GS1900 firmware with Ghidra

    Earlier this year the NSA released Ghidra, a reverse engineering suite with support for a large number of CPU/MCU instruction sets. While I have some experience with Hopper and radare2 I wanted to play with Ghidra to poke around the firmware for my Zyxel GS1900-8 switch which runs on a 32-bit MIPS CPU. All in all this has turned out to be an interesting exploration of both Ghidra and the GS1900-8-2.40(AAHH.2)C0.bix firmware image.

    Initially I wanted to write about poking around the firmware image and showing how one can use Ghidra to explore unknown binaries, but whilst looking around some libraries that are used by this switch I realised there is actually an interesting vulnerability to write about.

Audiocasts/Shows/Screencasts: Destination Linux, Linux Headlines and Oracle Linux 8.1 Overview

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Linux

Yocto-based Torizon distro adds OTA updater

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Development
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Toradex has released an experimental version of an OTA updater for its new Torizon embedded Linux distribution. Torizon OTA offers fault-tolerant features and supports web-based remote management including grouping of devices into fleets.

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Audiocasts/Shows: BSD Now and The Linux Link Tech Show (TLLTS)

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Linux
BSD

Security-Oriented Container Linux Gets Patched Against Latest Intel CPU Flaws

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GNU
Linux
Security

The security-oriented Container Linux by CoreOS GNU/Linux distribution has been updated this week with all the necessary patches to mitigate the latest Intel CPU microarchitecture vulnerabilities.

CoreOS Container Linux 2247.7.0 is here as the latest stable version of the security-oriented, minimal operating system for running containerized workloads securely and at scale, which was acquired by Red Hat last year and will soon become Fedora CoreOS. This release includes fixes for the CVE-2019-11135 and CVE-2018-12207 security vulnerabilities affecting Intel CPUs.

According to the release notes, CoreOS Container Linux 2247.7.0 fixes Intel CPU disclosure of memory to user process, but the complete mitigation requires manually disabling TSX or SMT on affected processors. Additionally, is also fixes Intel CPU denial of service by a malicious guest VM, and a CFS scheduler bug throttling highly-threaded I/O-bound applications.

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Khadas VIM3 NPU ToolKit Release & Video Demo

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Linux
Hardware

The toolkit works in host PCs running Ubuntu 16.04 or 18.04 with Tensorflow framework, and inference can run on both Linux and Android OS in Khadas VIM3/3L board. It includes an Inception v3 sample with 299×299 sample photos, among other demos. You’ll find documentation to get started with model conversion and inference in Linux on Khadas Wiki.

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What Linux Distributions Are Lightweight For Laptop And PC?

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GNU
Linux

The answer is different. from the default Ubuntu package there are several default applications that come installed when using GNOME (ubuntu desktop environment now).

When I use Xubuntu, I don't find some default applications from GNOME like those installed on Ubuntu. But we can still install and use GNOME applications, except for applications that relate to display settings, some features that exist in GNOME cannot be implemented on the Xubuntu desktop.

Xubuntu has a different display management application than GNOME. So, each desktop environment has different display settings

You can choose several desktop environments that are lighter than GNOME such as Xfce, Lxde, LXQt, KDE or can also use Window Manager that is lighter than the desktop environment.

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Pinebook Pro Review: A $200 laptop that’s only for cool people.

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Linux
Hardware
Reviews

There’s a $200 laptop out in the wild now that has been getting a lot of buzz in the Fediverse. It’s called the Pinebook Pro and it ships with a customized version of Debian Stretch with the Mate desktop. If you don’t know what that means, it’s Linux. This is a Linux laptop. But that’s not all… it also has a few other tricks up its sleeve, like a bootable MicroSD card slot so you can easily run other operating systems off a cheap memory card whenever you feel like it. Now, this is being sold at cost mainly as a gift to the Free (as in Freedom) Open Source Software (FOSS) community so it’s not really meant for normal people. If you just want to open web pages like Facebook or Google Docs, you’re probably better off with a Chromebook or Macbook. If you believe in freedom and like to seriously learn about technology, keep reading… The Pinebook Pro is serious fun!

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The 10 Best Geometry Software for Linux System in 2019

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GNU
Linux

Today whatever you consider, be it day to day life, physics, chemistry, architecture, space science, everywhere there is geometry. The invention of the computer has invented critical geometries and quick solutions to solve those. Many software is created to make geometry accessible and easy for everyone. The Linux dominated tech world has also created some excellent software for geometry. Thus, we shall discuss some geometry software for Linux that can fulfill almost all its related issues.

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Audiocasts/Shows: Linux Headlines, FLOSS Weekly, and "Why Doesn't Linux Work on my PC?!"

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GNU
Linux
  • 2019-11-20 | Linux Headlines

    Slack releases an open source mesh network, Private Internet Access is being bought, an update on the world's top supercomputers, another init system debate option for Debian to consider, and NVIDIA's new accelerated computing platform.

  • FLOSS Weekly 556: Chezmoi

    Chezmoi helps you manage your personal configuration files across multiple machines. It's flexible, personal and secure, robust, and fast and easy to use. It has particularly strong support for security, allowing you to manage secrets (e.g. passwords, access tokens, and private keys) securely and seamlessly using either gpg encryption or a password manager of your choice.

  • Why Doesn't Linux Work on my PC?!

    Why doesn't Linux work on your computer? In this video I explore some of the common reasons why this might be the case. I'll discuss some tips for finding the right hardware, and some general understanding of what some of the challenges are that we face with Linux compatibility today.

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today's howtos

Migrating the MAAS UI from AngularJS to React

MAAS (metal as a service), is a Canonical product which allows for very fast server provisioning and data centre management. Around 2014, work began to build a rich UI for MAAS, primarily using the AngularJS JavaScript framework from Google. AngularJS today is in long term support (LTS) and due to reach end-of-life in 2021. This year we began the work of transitioning away from AngularJS in anticipation of this impending EOL to more contemporary tooling. Evaluating Angular vs React Google’s recommended upgrade path for applications built in AngularJS is to transition to the Angular framework. Despite the similarity in naming, Angular is very different from AngularJS architecturally, and the migration process is non-trivial. While components (allowing for the now ubiquitous uni-directional data architectural pattern) were later backported from Angular to AngularJS, most of MAAS UI predated this and consequently migration to Angular would require significant app-wide refactoring. Since the inception of the MAAS UI, a number of other products had been built at Canonical using React. As we had developed significant experience using React, and tooling in the surrounding ecosystem, ultimately it made more sense to invest in transitioning the MAAS UI to React rather than Angular. This choice conferred additional benefits, such as standardising our build and testing infrastructure, and allows for component reuse across products. We also just generally enjoy working with React, and feel that the most significant developments in web UI technology are happening within the React ecosystem (hooks, concurrent mode, suspense, CRA). Read more

Haiku almost-monthly activity report - October and November 2019

The last two months have been quite busy for me and I had no time to write up a report. Remember that everyone is welcome to contribute to the website and if you wand to write the report from time to time, this would be much appreciated, by me because I wouldn’t need to do it, and by others because they will enjoy reading things written with a different style and perspective. Anyway, let’s look at what’s going on! Let’s start with the non-technical side of things. The months of october and november are traditionally quite active in Haiku (matching with our autumn-themed logo, of course). There was no BeGeistert this year, but I attended Alchimie and Capitole du Libre with mmu_man, while Korli, scottmc and Hy Che went to the GSoC mentor summit, which was in Germany this year. These events are an opportunity to advertise Haiku a bit, share ideas and projects with other alternative operating systems such as MorphOS, ReactOS, FreeBSD, or RTEMS, and overall meet other people working on open source software. All while managing this, we also had to get ready for Google Code-In, which is celebrating its 10th year. We are the only project with enough contributors and ideas to be able to participate every year since the contest was established, and look forward to what our contestants will accomplish this year. The first patches are already getting to our Gerrit code review. Read more Also: BeOS-Inspired Haiku Continues Working On 64-bit ARM, Other Hardware Improvements

Linux-Capable and Linux-Ready Hardware

  • Rugged Versalogic board expands upon Intel Apollo Lake

    Versalogic’s rugged, Linux-ready “Owl” SBC has an Intel Apollo Lake SoC with up to 8GB soldered ECC RAM, 8GB to 32GB eMMC, 2x GbE, 5x USB, 4x serial, and 2x mini-PCIe, plus SATA, LVDS, and mini-DP++. Versalogic announced a Linux-friendly SBC due in 1Q 2020 that continues its line of rugged, double-board Embedded Processing Unit (EPU) products built around Intel’s Apollo Lake Atom SoCs. The Owl will come out around the same time as the recently announced, avionics oriented Harrier, which followed a similar Osprey boardset from 2016.

  • Versalogic Owl Small Form Factor Apollo Lake Embedded Computer Targets Military & Industrial Applications

    VersaLogic Owl VL-EPU-4012 Embedded System Computer In October 2019 we reported on the VersaLogic Harrier computer that was slightly bigger than a credit card.

  • Tiny USB bridge board helps tame I2C traffic

    Excamera has gone to Crowd Supply to launch a tiny, open source “I2CMini” USB-to-I2C bridge board for controlling and monitoring I2C traffic. The $17 device has a Qwiic connector, a 4-pin header, and a micro-USB port. A year ago, Excamera Labs launched a $29 I2CDriver I2C debugging board. Now the company has returned to Crowd Supply to pitch a simpler, $17 I2CMini USB-to-I2C bridge device that is similarly designed to plug into a Linux, Mac, or Windows computer via a micro-USB port.

  • Edge AI motherboard combines Coffee Lake with MXM-linked Nvidia GPU cards

    Ibase unveiled a Linux-supported “MT800M-P” motherboard for AI applications with an 8th Gen Coffee Lake CPU and an MXM slot for Nvidia GPU cards. Other features include 4x GbE, 2x DP, PCIe, M.2, and mini-PCIe. After watching the embedded industry squeeze and shrink their products for power- and space-efficient IoT devices, we’ve lately seen a modest trend towards giganticism as systems bulk up to support full-size GPU boards for edge AI applications. The latest is Ibase’s 270 x 220mm Intel Coffee Lake based MT800M-P SBC, which supports AI services such as speech recognition, image analysis, and visual search and media processing in the retail, banking and transportation industries.

  • Rikomagic MK25 Amlogic S922X TV Box Supports Digital Signage Features
  • Marlin 2.0 Open Source 3D Printer Firmware Finally Released

    Back in June, we wrote about Marlin 2.0 firmware supporting ESP32 3D printer board, but at the time the firmware was still in RC1 (Release for Comment) phase.

  • Qualcomm Unveils Snapdragon 865, 765, and 765G 5G Mobile Platforms
  • NVIDIA Looks To Have Some Sort Of Open-Source Driver Announcement For 2020

    We were tipped off by a Phoronix reader to this GTC session for GTC 2020 by NVIDIA engineer John Hubbard. It's about "Open Source, Linux Kernel, and NVIDIA." The talk abstract is: "We'll report up-to-the-minute developments on NVIDIA's status and activities, and possibly (depending on last-minute developments) a few future plans and directions, regarding our contributions to Linux kernel; supporting Nouveau (the open source kernel driver for NVIDIA GPUs, that is in the Linux kernel), including signed firmware behavior, documentation, and patches; and NVIDIA kernel drivers." Color us surprised and damn excited, as long as their announcement is substantive.