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Top 8 File and Disk Encryption Tools for Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software
Security

Data protection is an imperative aspect of digital security for both businesses and individuals. In this new remote work environment brought on by COVID-19, securing one’s private data is more critical than ever.

Linux handles this issue far better than Windows or MacOS due to its transparent open-source code and the passionate global community constantly reviewing it. With so many astute eyes on Linux source code, security vulnerabilities are quickly detected and solved - which is why those looking for a highly secure OS often turn to Linux.

That being said, this doesn’t mean that your Linux computer is 100% unhackable. In fact, the growing popularity of Linux is making the OS an increasingly popular target among malicious hackers. Thus, it never hurts to add a layer of privacy in the form of file and disk encryption.

File and disk encryption makes your data unreadable and unusable even if your computer does get hacked. In this article we explore the eight best file and disk encryption tools for Linux.

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Sign this petition for freedom in the classroom

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GNU

As discussion among free software activists on our libreplanet-discuss mailing list has shown in recent weeks, digital education can thrive when we make freedom a priority. No student should have to trade their freedom for an education. The Free Software Foundation (FSF) has already worked together with an MIT professor to free his classes, and have been sharing our knowledge with the Boston public school system. Today, we're taking the next step in that commitment.

Beginning today, we are working to change the remote education landscape with a new petition targeting the serious harm proprietary software poses to students, and at the same time, emphasizing the idea that there is an ethical solution. Whether it's Microsoft Teams being used to connect students to each other, Google Classroom being used to write every document, or Zoom being used for the classroom session itself, we want to get the message across that the only acceptable answer when it comes to how much proprietary software should be permitted in schools is none. Making students depend on nonfree software to learn is not only harmful to them in the short-term, but it is a failed opportunity to impart the values of free access, studying, sharing, and collaboration.

At the FSF, we are working hard to make free software a kitchen table issue: one that's spoken about and taken seriously by people from all walks of life, and is not just a cause taken up by a small but impassioned community. We understand that speaking up for yourself about these issues can be difficult, which is why we're offering to put our voice behind yours as the leading organization in the movement. When signing the petition, you have the option to let us know if you're a student, parent, teacher, or administrator of a school that requires the use of proprietary software. We'll get in touch with their administration on your behalf, and let them know that a global community of activists and everyday people alike have signed a statement in support of free software in education.

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Screencasts and Audiocasts: KaOS 2020.07 Run Through, Linux in the Ham Shack and This Week in Linux

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GNU
Linux

  • KaOS 2020.07 Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at KaOS 2020.07.

  • LHS Episode #357: Lethal Weapon

    Welcome to the 357th installment of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this episode, the hosts talk about the new amateur radio youth database, Mortty, the Icom IC-705, an open-source COVID-19 tracker, TrueNAS, SDR++ and much more. Stay safe and sane out there and thank you for listening.

  • This Week in Linux 109: Flutter Apps to Linux, 3GB RAM PinePhone, Mobian, Stop Using BountySource!

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, Google & Ubuntu teamed up to bring Flutter Apps to Linux. We’ve got a LOT of news in the Mobile Linux world with a New more powerful PinePhone from Pine64 that even comes with a USB Convergence Dock, then we’ll talk about Mobian: Mobile OS based on Debian, and then we’ve. even got some news from Gentoo about using Gentoo on Android. We’ve got some great distro news this week from EndeavourOS & MX Linux. Then we’ll jump into the App News realm to cover the Personal Edition branding for LibreOffice, Riot has chosen the name Element as their branding replacement, and we’ll talk about even more branding with some news about a fork of Brave browser getting threatened with legal action. Then I’ll let know about some concerning news about BountySource and why projects should abandon the service. All that and much more on Your Weekly Source for Linux GNews!

Linux/Hackable Devices: OnLogic, Wind River and More

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GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Comet Lake-S computers support Ubuntu

    OnLogic’s fanless, $768-and-up “Helix 500” and larger, PCIe x16 enabled, $859-and-up “Helix 600” run Ubuntu or Windows on Intel’s 10th Gen Comet Lake-S with triple display support, 2x M.2, 2x GbE, and 6x USB 3.1 Gen 2 ports.

    OnLogic has launched two Helix Series embedded computers that support Ubuntu. The fanless, Linux-ready Helix 500 (HX500) and Helix 600 (HX600) share the same choice of 10th Gen Comet Lake-S processors and a base feature set. The Helix 600 adds a PCIe x16 slot and 2x expansion I/O slots for custom modules.

  • Wind River Recognized as #1 in Edge Compute OS Platforms

    Wind River®, a leader in delivering software for the intelligent edge, upholds its long-standing ranking as the technology leader in the real-time operating system (RTOS) and commercial Linux categories with its flagship VxWorks® and Wind River Linux, according to VDC Research. The company has also surpassed Microsoft as the overall commercial leader in the edge compute OS market.

  • KitDuino Proto – An Arduino Compatible Board with a Built-in Prototyping Area

    At the initial stage of development, many people would connect their Arduino board to a circuit build on a breadboard, and once this is done, some may either want to design their own board or for simpler circuits, simply move from the breadboard to a perfboard with components soldered to it.

    With Microchip ATMega32U4 based KitDuino Proto you could do that directly on the Arduino board itself since it comes with a small prototyping area.

  • QNAP QSW-1105-5T 2.5 Gbps Ethernet Switch Targets Home Users

    But if you intended to upgrade your home network to 2.5 Gbps Ethernet (aka 2.5GbE) possibly with an ODROID-H2+ single board computer in the mix, you may have found 2.5GbE switches are pretty expensive going for several hundred dollars.

  • WCH CH569 RISC-V SoC Offers USB 3.0, Gigabit Ethernet, High-Speed SERDES & HSPI Interfaces

    CH569 appears to be the first RISC-V processor part of WCH CH56x family of RISC (note: not V here) processor for networked storage applications with CH565, CH566, CH567, and CH568 offering a mix of Ethernet, SATA, USB 2.0, and other interfaces All chips come with the same 120 MHz RISC processor, and only 32KB RAM (128-bit wide), but the company claims the 128-bit DMA engine can transfer large amount of data.

    [...]

    At this point, there’s very little information available, and everything is in Chinese on the product page, but at least you can request more information and samples.

Xfce Review: A Lean, Mean Linux Machine

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GNU
Linux
Reviews

One of the best parts about Xfce is that it’s flexible enough for anybody. Whether you’re a GNOME user looking for something lighter, someone with an old machine that struggles under heavier Desktop Environments, or just looking to keep things simple, I cannot recommend Xfce enough. It will serve you well, and with just a little customization and tweaking, it can look and work however you want it to.

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Download Now: Glimpse 0.2.0 Beta Available for Testing

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GNU

Glimpse 0.2.0 is based on GIMP 2.10.18. Like previous releases Glimpse iterates on the popular image editor to broaden its appeal, soften its image, and “back port useful functionality”.

“A new name and logo, a cleaner UI, and fewer “easter eggs” make an already amazing open source software package feel more enterprise-ready,” states the official website.

While there isn’t a user-facing overview of what changes are specifically new to Glimpse 0.2.0 at the time of writing most of GIMP’s recent feature additions (like new 3D transform tool, faster .abr loading, etc) are present and working here.

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Videos/Audiocasts: Remnants of Naezith, Linux Headlines and Ubuntu Update Hack Chat

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GNU
Linux
  • Remnants of Naezith | Linux Gaming | Ubuntu 20.04 | Native

    Remnants of Naezith running natively through Linux.

  • 2020-07-20 | Linux Headlines

    Pine announces exciting additions to its product line, The Linux Foundation picks up a project donation from Ireland's health service, OPPO unveils an impressive new fast-charging standard, and a vote of no confidence petition fails to remove the openSUSE board.

  • Ubuntu Update Hack Chat

    Everyone has their favorite brands, covering everything from the clothes they wear to the cars they drive. We see brand loyalty informing all sorts of acquisition decisions, not only in regular consumer life but in technology, too. Brand decisions sort people into broad categories like Mac versus PC, or iPhone versus Android, and can result in spirited discussions of the relative merits of one choice over the others. It’s generally well-intentioned, even if it gets a bit personal sometimes.

    Perhaps no choice is more personal in hacker circles than which Linux distribution to use. There are tons to choose from, each with their various features and particular pros and cons. Ubuntu has become a very popular choice for Linux aficionados, attracting more than a third of the market. Canonical is the company behind the Debian-based distro, providing editions that run on the desktop, on servers, and on a variety of IoT devices, as well as support and services for large-scale users.

    To fill us in on what’s new in the world of Ubuntu, Canonical product manager Rhys Davies and developer advocate Alan Pope will stop by the Hack Chat this week. They’ll be ready to answer all your questions about the interesting stuff that’s going on with Ubuntu, including the recently announced Ubuntu Appliances, easy to install, low maintenance images for Raspberry Pis and PCs that are built for security and simplicity. We’ll also talk about snaps, desktops, and whatever else crops up.

Tuxedo Pulse 15: An Ubuntu laptop with 45 W AMD Renoir APUs and a 91 Wh battery

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

Tuxedo has announced its latest laptop, the Pulse 15. Based on the same design as the Schenker VIA 15 Pro, the Tuxedo Pulse 15 can be equipped with either an AMD Ryzen 5 4600H or a Ryzen 7 4800H APU. These Renoir chips can be paired with up to 64 GB of RAM, a 2 TB SSD and in a variety of keyboard layouts. The laptop has a 91 Wh battery like the VIA 15 Pro, which has been installed in a 356 x 17 x 234 mm chassis that weighs 1.5 kg.

The magic of the Pulse 15, and all Tuxedo laptops for that matter, is its software support. Tuxedo pre-installs Ubunutu and TUXEDO_OS 64-bit, which is based on Ubuntu with Budgie Desktop. The company also includes WebFAI for managing your Linux installation. Additionally, the company offers openSUSE 15 with Xfce, Gnome or KDE plasma, all of which are configured and pre-loaded with all drivers and updates.

On request, Tuxedo can also encrypt your Linux system, details of which you can read here. You can ask Tuxedo to install Windows too, for which it will provide a license key, sticker and installation DVD. Please note that this can add 1-2 working days of additional lead time to the configuration of your device.

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(Y)our recent successes towards software freedom in Europe

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GNU
OSS

The spread of Covid-19 brought dramatic and drastic changes for us and our societies. One of the things most of us experienced was to stay at home or in quarantine. Apart from severe consequences people have been facing, suddenly many people also have been forced to work from home. In response, our community was quick and eager in helping people to stay in control of technology. In the very beginning already, our community members gathered knowledge and wrote a guide to freedom respecting online collaboration and communication tools into our wiki.

In our official channels, the FSFE focused early on highlighting that global problems need global solutions. And on explaining why only Free Software creates global solutions and cooperations. We received positive feedback and we luckily have seen tremendous success with our message: the European Union, the World Health Organsation and the EU eHealth Network followed our arguments and they now recommend to any COVID-19 contact tracing app development to be published as Free Software. Many countries followed their recommendations, for example StoppCorona in Austria, PrivateTracer in the Netherlands, the Corona Warn App in Germany or eRouška in Czech Republic.

This is a huge success for software freedom! And it is a result of our daily work we all persistently invest in Free Software advocacy. Since almost 20 years the FSFE is part of an ever growing freedom respecting community in Europe. We gather reliable expertise and consultancy and continuously explain the public and political representatives the benefits of software freedom. Now, in the face of the crisis, national and international players finally seem to realize the advantages of Free Software.

[...]

If we take a look at the big picture and away from the COVID-19 apps, many administrations recently have announced to follow our road to freedom. Hamburg wants to focus more on Free Software, Munich commits to "Public Money? Public Code!", the Netherlands commit to Free Software by default, the Spanish Municipality of Benigànim signs our Open Letter of the "Public Money? Public Code!" campaign and the German city of Bühl uses Free Software to connect their citizens. We like to help them on their journey and ask more to join! We like to make sure people understand that this is a long term activity and offer help and guidance.

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New Videos and Shows

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Linux
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Android Leftovers

Security-Oriented Kodachi Linux 7.2 Released with One of the Best Secure Messengers

Based on the latest Xubuntu 18.04 LTS point release, Kodachi Linux 7.2 codename “Defeat” comes with the newest Ubuntu kernel that’s patched against recent security vulnerabilities and full sync with the upstream Bionic Beaver repositories to provide users with an up-to-date installation media. On top of that, the new release introduces new security features, such as Session Messenger, a popular private messenger that the Kodachi Linux team doubts as one of the best secure messengers and the Steghide UI utility for hiding encrypted text messages in images, text or audio files. Read more

Linux and Linux Foundation: 5.9 Kernel and LF Edge

  • Intel SERIALIZE, Dropping Of SGI UV Supercomputer, i386 Clang'ing Hit Linux 5.9

    A number of x86-related changes were sent out today for the first full day of the Linux 5.9 merge window. 

  •         
  • Btrfs Seeing Some Nice Performance Improvements For Linux 5.9

    With more eyes on Btrfs given the file-system is set to become the default for Fedora 33 desktop spins, there are some interesting performance optimizations coming to Btrfs with the in-development Linux 5.9 kernel.  On the performance front for Btrfs in Linux 5.9 there are optimized helpers for little-endian architectures to avoid little/big endian conversions around the on-disk format, tree-log/fsync optimizations yielding around a 12% lower maximum latency for the Dbench benchmark, faster mount times for large file-systems in the terabyte range, and parallel fsync optimizations. 

  • As IoT Continues to Evolve, LF Edge Explores the Edge Continuum in a New White Paper

    Earlier this month, LF Edge, an umbrella organization under The Linux Foundation, published a white paper updating the industry on their continued ecosystem collaboration. LF Edge brings together projects within the Foundation, that “aims to establish an open, interoperable framework for edge computing independent of hardware, silicon, cloud, or operating system.”

Open Hardware With Arduino: Counter and MKR ZERO

  • Keep track of your laps in the pool with this Arduino counter

    PeterQuinn925 swims for exercise, and to train for the occasional triathlon, but when doing so he often zones out and forgets how many laps he has swam. To solve this problem without spending a lot of money on a commercial solution, he created his own counter using an Arduino Nano and an ultrasonic sensor. The sensor detects when a swimmer approaches, and the system calculates distance based on this, assuming that a lap is roughly 50 yards or meters. This info is announced audibly via a speaker/amplifier using an Arduino speech library and is shown on a 7-segment display.

  • Recreating Rosie the Robot with a MKR ZERO

    While 2020 may seem like a very futuristic year, we still don’t have robotic maids like the Jetsons’ Rosie the Robot. For his latest element14 Presents project, DJ Harrigan decided to create such a bot as a sort of animatronic character, using an ESP8266 board for interface and overall control, and a MKR ZERO to play stored audio effects. The device features a moveable head, arms and eyes, and even has a very clever single-servo gear setup to open and close its mouth.