Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

GNU

KaOS 2019.10

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux

Quite a few big changes for this release, probably the biggest news for this release is for the first time the default install is python2 free. Python2 will be depreciated by the end of this year, so it is time to get this distribution ready for this change. The repositories still contain python2 packages, but those are in the process of being phased out too.

Next change is a new GCC 9.2.0/Glibc 2.30 based Toolchain. Normally KaOS stays about one year behind major new GCC versions, but the changes between 8 and 9 are not as big as usual and all in the repositories have caught up to GCC 9, thus it is now available six months after the initial release.
A big part of the core repository was rebuild in this new Toolchain, plus the whole Glib2 and Boost stacks were updated. This meant moving to Glib2 2.62.2, Boost 1.71.0, Gobject-Introspection 1.6.20 among the many moved to their latest version. Systemd is now also available in the most recent release, 243.

Read more

GIMP 2.10.14 Released

Filed under
GNU
Software

This is basically the first shot at the previously missing feature set, so expect more to land to GIMP at some point in the future. Making selection tools work outside the canvas sounds like a sensible next stop. Then maybe we can seriously talk about boundless canvas.

This new feature is closely related to out-of-canvas viewing and editing and was also contributed by Ell.

Now when you e.g. rotate a single-layer image, you can use this transform type to automatically expand the canvas to include all of rotated pixels when using the default Adjust clipping mode. The switch is right next to layer/path/selection toggle at the top of any transform tool’s settings.

Read more

Also: GIMP 2.10.14 Released With Better HEIF Support, More Filters Ported To Using GEGL

Meet the Startup That Wants to Connect Linux to the Blockchain

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Cartesi operates based on the entirely pragmatic principle that achieving full consensus over every computation within all applications is at odds with achieving true scalability. Therefore, it’s a layer 2 solution that enables intensive computations to take place off-chain, in Cartesi nodes. These nodes are general, self-contained Linux systems, running on a deterministic RISC-V architecture.

Smart contracts from any blockchain can request off-chain computations to be performed on off-chain data by a Cartesi node. Because the computations are happening off-chain, this enables Cartesi nodes to run vastly more complex dApps than existing blockchains can manage. Developers can request that the nodes submit the results of the off-chain computations, or dispute the results provided by others.

Read more

GNU: Releases of GNUnet, FSFE Newsletter, Richard Stallman Quoted in African Media

Filed under
GNU
  • GNUnet 0.11.8 released

    We are pleased to announce the release of GNUnet 0.11.8.

    This is a hotfix release for 0.11.7. As always: In terms of usability, users should be aware that there are still a large number of known open issues in particular with respect to ease of use, but also some critical privacy issues especially for mobile users. Also, the nascent network is tiny (about 200 peers) and thus unlikely to provide good anonymity or extensive amounts of interesting information. As a result, the 0.11.8 release is still only suitable for early adopters with some reasonable pain tolerance.

  • GNUnet 0.11.7 released

    We are pleased to announce the release of GNUnet 0.11.7.

    This is a bugfix release for 0.11.6, fixing a lot of minor bugs, improving stability and code quality. Further, win32 support was removed for reasons you may read below. In this release, we again improved the webpage in general and updated our documentation. As always: In terms of usability, users should be aware that there are still a large number of known open issues in particular with respect to ease of use, but also some critical privacy issues especially for mobile users. Also, the nascent network is tiny (about 200 peers) and thus unlikely to provide good anonymity or extensive amounts of interesting information. As a result, the 0.11.7 release is still only suitable for early adopters with some reasonable pain tolerance.

  • FSFE Newsletter October 2019

    This month, we focus our attention on digital restrictions and the International Day against them. To this end, we launched our first episode of the monthly Software Freedom Podcast, this time starring Cory Doctorow talking about DRM. We have published our yearly report, summing up our activities of the past 12 months and shining light on the community we build our success on. As usual, you will also discover upcoming events with the FSFE, including our Annual Community meeting, as well as recordings and information from events we participated in.

  • Being a citizen: Turning the lenses on self

    There is always a consequence to exclusion and creation of elite classes in view of citizenship, because “the reason that a good citizen does not use such destructive means to become wealthier is that, if everyone did so, we would all become poorer from the mutual destructiveness” (Richard Stallman).

    If we are all corrupt and Hegelian materialism becomes the new norm, then, what will become of us as a people? What will become of our country?

Audiocasts/Shows/Screencasts: FLOSS Weekly, Linux Headlines, Fedora 31 Run Through

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • FLOSS Weekly 553: Hacker Public Radio

    Hacker Public Radio is a podcast that is dedicated to sharing knowledge. Its shows are crowd-sourced from the community, with no restriction on length nor topic as long as the show is not spam and are of interest to hackers.

  • 2019-10-30 | Linux Headlines

    Microsoft open sources more code, a replacement for managing wireless networking in Linux, changes at Dropbox, and why the Conservancy would like to hear from Tesla owners.

  • Fedora 31 Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at Fedora 31.

Pop!_OS 19.10 is a wonder that makes me wonder

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

I make no bones about being a big fan of System76. Not only do they walk the open source walk, but their in-house hardware (the Thelio) might well be the single best desktop computer I have ever owned, and their laptops are high on the list. That hardware is made even more impressive with Pop!_OS running on top.

For those that aren't in the know, Pop!_OS is System76's in-house take on Linux. Built on a foundation of Ubuntu, the operating system includes a few tweaks, geared specifically toward System76 hardware. Those tweaks make Pop!_OS truly sing on the Thelio (it runs fine on non-System76 hardware as well).

Recently, in accordance with Ubuntu 19.10, System76 released the latest iteration of Pop!_OS, and I'm here to tell you that this release is truly a wonder…. One that makes me wonder.

Let me explain.

First I want to discuss what makes this new release so good.

Read more

GIMP 2.10.14 Released With New Show All View Mode, Loaded Images Now Default to 72 PPI

Filed under
GNU
Software

GIMP 2.10.14 comes with a new Show All view mode that allows showing pixels outside the canvas boundary. You can mark the canvas boundary with a new Show Canvas Boundary option that renders a dotted line around it. There's also a new Keep Padding option in the new Show All view mode, to preserve the padding color instead of displaying the checkerboard.

Also, several features were updated to work with this new Show All mode, including color-picking, canvas grid, transform tools, bucket fill, and more.

Read more

Audiocasts/Shows: LINUX Unplugged, mintCast, Python Podcasts

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Pango Dropping Support For Bitmap Fonts Is Frustrating Some Linux Desktop Users

Filed under
GNU
Linux
GNOME

Cleaning up of the Pango layout engine library as some much needed housekeeping by GNOME developers resulted in shifting to the Harfbuzz library for font loading. That quietly meant dropping support for bitmap fonts from Pango, which is now reaching Linux desktop users when upgrading to the Pango 1.44 stable release.

Some Linux desktop users are being surprised when their Pango-using applications are no longer loading their bitmap fonts but just showing square blocks or similar artifacts instead. Pango, of course, is the layout engine used by GTK and Qt among other desktop software.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Open Source Firmware updates for the masses! (Part 1)

Thanks to the Linux Vendor Firmware Service it's now much easier to update firmware on Linux. The LVFS supports a huge amount of devices, brings it's own firmware database, has a nice UI and periodically checks if new firmware updates are available. Hardware vendors can upload their firmware to LVFS, which charges no cost for hosting or distribution. Read more Also: Coreboot Support Is Being Worked On For Fwupd/LVFS

GNU: GCC, GNU Assembler and Spring Internships at the FSF

  • AMD GCN OpenMP/OpenACC Offloading Patches For The GCC 10 Compiler

    Over the past year Code Sourcery / Mentor Graphics has been working extensively on the new AMD Radeon "GCN" back-end for the GCC code compiler. With the code that is found in GCC 9 and up to now in GCC 10 hasn't supported OpenMP/OpenACC parallel programming interfaces but that could soon change with patches under review. The Radeon GPU support in GCC up to now hasn't supported OpenMP or OpenACC for offloading to the graphics processor and thus its practicality has been limited.

  • GNU Assembler Patches Sent Out For Optimizing The Intel Jump Conditional Code Erratum

    Now that Intel lifted its embargo on the "Jump Conditional Code" erratum affecting Skylake through Cascade Lake processors, while Intel's own Clear Linux was first to carry these patches they have now been sent out on the Binutils mailing list for trying to get the JCC optimization patches into the upstream Binutils/GAS code-base. Well known Intel compiler toolchain expert H.J. Lu sent out the five patches on Tuesday for optimizing around the JCC Erratum. The GNU Assembler (GAS) patches aim to mitigate the performance by aligning branches within 32-byte boundaries for various instructions. The behavior is activated via the -mbranches-within-32B-boundaries command line switch.

  • Spring internships at the FSF! Apply by Nov. 29

    Do you believe that free software is crucial to a free society? Do you want to help people learn why free software matters, and how to use it? Do you want to dig deep into software freedom issues like copyleft, Digital Restrictions Management (DRM), or surveillance and encryption? Or, do you want to learn systems administration, design, or other tasks using only free software? The Free Software Foundation (FSF) is looking for interns to spend the summer contributing to work in one of three areas: campaigns, licensing, or technical. These positions are unpaid, but the FSF will provide any appropriate documentation you might need to receive funding and school credit from outside sources. We also provide lunch expense reimbursement and a monthly transportation pass that will give you free access to local subways and buses (MBTA). We place an emphasis on providing hands-on educational opportunities for interns, in which they work closely with staff mentors on projects that match their skills and interest.

Games: Parkitect Taste of Adventure and CodeWeavers Working on Steam Play

  • Theme park building sim Parkitect is getting a Taste of Adventure expansion

    Releasing on November 20, Texel Raptor just announced the first big expansion to their incredibly fun theme park building game Parkitect and I couldn't be more excited. I remember being completely absorbed by the classic Theme Park from Bullfrog in my youth, to which Parkitect firmly filled the hole it left in my adult life. Parkitect doesn't necessarily need an expansion, it already has everything that makes it a great game. However, I will gladly take this expansion so I can happily play even more of it.

  • CodeWeavers Is Hiring Another Graphics Developer To Help With Wine D3D / Steam Play

    CodeWeavers is looking to hire another developer to work on Wine's graphics stack and in particular the WineD3D code while having an emphasis that it's part of Valve's Steam Play (Proton) efforts.

  • CodeWeavers are after a Graphics Developer for Steam Play Proton and Wine

    CodeWeavers, the company that helps to support development of Wine and are currently partnered up with Valve to help with Steam Play/Proton have a new Graphics Developer position open. This is a completely different position to the one we posted about before, which is a more generalised role. Instead, their new Graphics Developer position would have you working on Wine's Direct3D implementation. Quite a complicated role, involving early DirectDraw up until modern Direct3D 12 in addition to Vulkan and OpenGL.

Removals From Linux 5.4

  • VirtualBox SF Driver Ejected From The Linux 5.4 Kernel

    Merged to the mainline Linux kernel last week was a driver providing VirtualBox guest shared folder support with the driver up to now being out-of-tree but important for sharing files between the host and guest VM(s). While the driver was part of Linux 5.4-rc7, Linus Torvalds decided to delete this driver on Tuesday. The VirtualBox Shared Folder (VBOXSF) driver will not be part of the mainline Linux 5.4 kernel. Linus was unhappy that it didn't have the necessary sign-offs plus that it's coming late in the cycle and not appearing to meet quality expectations.

  • The Linux Kernel Disabling HPET For Intel Coffee Lake

    Another Intel change being sent off for Linux 5.4 and to be back-ported to current stable series is disabling of HPET for Coffee Lake systems. Due to bug reports going back at least a half-year and workarounds not panning out, kernel developers have decided to blacklist the High Precision Event Timer (HPET) on Coffee Lake systems. Some Coffee Lake systems have a skewed HPET timer when entering the PC10 power state and that in turn marks the time stamp counter (TSC) as unstable.